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R W Burgess

Ward Hill's new Project - 1955 MG TF-1500

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My project is a 1955 MG TF-1500, last of the T-series. Currently all disassembled with the frame ready for refinishing. The pro shops quoted 2 years and $50,000 for a show quality restoration. What with $18,000 to buy a really solid car to start with, that seemed unreasonable, sooo! All is going well after I developed a Microsoft Project template to track all part removal, condition and planned restoration, storage location, outsourced work, etc. I found local shops competent to do all the mechanical work and plenty of sources for the parts. Any AACA member interested in the tracking template is welcome to it.

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I did restore a TF-1500 years ago, nice car. What the heck does a Microsoft Project template look like can you sand body work with it, does it have a practical use?

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Microsoft Project is a widely-used computer program for planning, tracking and reporting progress, costs, resource usage, etc. for projects and programs of nearly any scope. A template is project plan set up for a specific type of project with blank data so another person can insert their own info. I found dedicated data base programs available for car restoration projects that cost several hundred dollars, but decided I could do the same thing in Microsoft Project at no cost since I already owned that program. Anyone who wants to use the template would also need to have access to the Microsoft program, of course, since it is also relatively expensive to buy.

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Ward, The Microsoft whatever is way over my head, however make a note that the car will not be done in 2 years and the restoration cost will exceed the $50,000. estimate you recieved. The only thing the program will tell you is your hourly rate if you log in all the time spent.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: 1937hd45</div><div class="ubbcode-body">the car will not be done in 2 years and the restoration cost will exceed the $50,000. estimate you recieved.</div></div>

Guaranteed. Ever see the movie, "The Money Pit"?

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And when he figures up his hourly rate of pay, it's be about 50 cents per hour if you're REALLY lucky!!! ...B

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OK all you pessimists. I should have mentioned that I have done 2 Austin Healies and 3 Jags over the years with a wide range of costs depending on how much I did myself, varying from nearly all myself to nearly all by others. Given you'all's challenge, I promise a complete accounting. These 50's and 60's British sports cars make good projects because nearly all the parts are readily available, often within 1 week of order, at reasonable prices. In this case I paid a premium to get a good car to start with that will pay dividends in schedule and cost to complete. Look me up at the Lake (Cumberland Spring Meet)in May (I'm the registrar for the rest of the story.

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Ward, best wishes on your project. This is actually a very supportive group and while we have had others post progress, I think it would be a first to see your progress on the file as well as just pix and descriptions of particular milestones and challenges. Do you use this to project estimated costs and time lines or mainly to track the actual after the fact?

A "T" series is one of those cars I always wanted (Did have a TR-6 that was a great car.) - you can't have them all..but you can try! Like a Model A, I always thought the MG-Ts lend themselves to the hobbyist who is doing their own work - simple design, easy to get parts for, small and a good support group.

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I like doing projects my way. I never keep track of costs or hours. Since I never sell anything, it really doesn't matter. smile.gif

Since classic car insurance is "agreed value" I just have to guess. If my guess is too outrageous, they make me get an appraisal. My guesses have been pretty good so far.

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Lots of variables to consider, but I figure a complete MG "T" in reasonably good condition will run less than 25K - 30K if Ward does the body and paint work himself. Wood and tin on these cars more critical than mechanicals. Chrome (those cars don't have a lot), machine work and upholstery are most likely to be sent out? Also, to what level is he shooting for? I would be interested in seeing where he ends up for the fun of it and nothing else..

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OK Guys, About 30 days later. disassembly is completed, all parts tagged, bagged and registered in the tracking program. Chrome is 50% new, rechromed parts are finished, chassis parts are refinished ready for assembly, tranny is rebuilt and ready, engine is in final machining with all parts here, axle is out for gear conversion (don't tell!), and I am focused on body prep for refinishing. I am now distracted by work as registration chairman for the 2008 Spring National Meet so I expect some delay and slow pace for the assembly process, especially since I want all the fasteners to be correct, and I will have to sort hundreds of pictures to find the ones I might really need.

By the way, I figure I'm making at least the same wages as I would pay for professional restoration mechanics. At least that keeps me motivated!

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Peter,

Here is the MS Project Template. It has some of my data in it to show how I use it. Of course a user must have the MS Project program installed to use this. Project is a pretty expensive program, but prior versions will run this at lower cost. There is another product to do this from Nigel West (UK). Try: http://www.restoration-manager.com/catalog/

20783.zip

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