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Deductions


RVAnderson
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If it is a FACTORY authorized (from Ford, GM, Chrysler, etc.) lic. plate frame, then there is no deduction for authenticity, only condition if it is in bad shape. I was presuming Anderson's frame was aftermarket and probably should have made sure.

I would make a copy of the factory lititure showing that frame to be available from Ford and make sure I had it with me at the meet. When the team captain introduces himself (as he is suppose to do) mention that you have factory documention with you for it (should really have it for all accessories to be safe) if there are any questions on authenititcy.

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What it is, is a little 2-piece bracket that wasn't made by Ford until around 1920 but was designed to fit earlier cars as well. Until then, folks stuck the plate on the car in any one of a hundred ways. My car is registered with YOM plates which are authentic, of course, but the bracket that hold the front plate date about 6 years later than the car.

I have heard this item(s) referred to as both "the bracket" and as "the brackets." So I asked the experts.

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I didn't understand it to be the bracket holding the tag onto the car. I was thinking a frame like from the dealer which I've also heard called a bracket. Sorry

I misunderstood.

Yes, MCHinson is right that it should be a common sense thing and not a deduction.

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It would be interesting to see how many non-authentic items you could fit a car with and still win an AACA Senior. Let's see:

Seatbelts

Electric starter pre-16

Turn signals

Mirrors

Dealer Logo

AACA license plate holder

Trippe lights

Highlighted Chevrolet or Cadillac script valve covers

Nylon carpet

Headlights with adjusting tips

Club badges

I'm sure there are more.

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Great; that would make prepping a lot easier if that little bracket(s) could just stay on the car. With the plate off, it's hard to spot anyway.

Novaman: I was waiting for you to come back by my spaces at Hershey. I even made a fresh batch of coffee! What happened--get a better offer?? grin.gif

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Restorer32</div><div class="ubbcode-body">It would be interesting to see how many non-authentic items you could fit a car with and still win an AACA Senior. Let's see:

Seatbelts

Electric starter pre-16

Turn signals

Mirrors

Dealer Logo

AACA license plate holder

Trippe lights

Highlighted Chevrolet or Cadillac script valve covers

Nylon carpet

Headlights with adjusting tips

Club badges

I'm sure there are more. </div></div>

Are you really allowed to put an electric starter on an pre-16 car without a deduction?! That's ridiculous. shocked.gif

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Without consulting the judging manual, I'm not saying yea or nay on the starter being acceptable.

But the idea of it being accepted would be to get the 80+ year guy with his 1909 Whatever that he can no longer hand crank to start, to bring his car out to the show. I tried cranking one restored car at age 16 and could barely turn it over.

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  • 2 weeks later...

"Trippe and Pilot Ray driving lights are accepted on classic cars and certain pre-WWII production vehicles." This is our statement in the 2007 Judging Manual. I certainly think your car would fall under the "certain" category but also subject to the usual fit, finish, etc. judging.

Steve: Ridiculous? I think not, it has been our goal to get more cars out to tours and shows and cranking just ain't any fun on some of these cars. My 1908 I did not install a starter because there was no way to do it in a workmanlike manner. We do deduct if the starter is not installed with some care and concern to its appearance. However, with 6 operations on my spine cranking is not something I really WANT to do, especially on a cold fall morning!

The 1911 was another story, 700 plus cubic inches, two big old sharp grease cups waiting for your hand to slip (put one guy in the hospital before we ever started the restoration) but a nice big old belly pan that hid the starter and the switch was very cleverly hidden.

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