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2007 Hershey Show Sat.10/13


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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: 1937hd45</div><div class="ubbcode-body">It's a lost cause trying to explain anything to the owner of a Wal-Mart lot car no matter how old the owner is. They have taken over the hobby, and every year there is another wave of cars pushing the PreWarCars and their owners out. I wonder if the Hershey Region has members that just stoped working on the meet because of the Wal-Mart era car owners attitudes. <span style="font-weight: bold">Me Me Me</span> My car is 25 years old <span style="font-weight: bold">serve me.</span> </div></div>

And among those two groups you've defined, the "Wal-Mart cars" and <span style="font-style: italic">Deserving Ones</span> (for lack of a better term), which are the ones insisting that the other doesn't deserve to be around <span style="text-decoration: underline">them</span>? "Me Me Me" indeed!

Nobody's being "pushed" anywhere. If self-absorbed people are judging the company of others they've attracted as beneath them, so be it. Their loss. The rejected ones just didn't find what they thought they did in our community. frown.gif

And (unfortunately) the club's loss as well.

And (worst of all) the early car's loss. So many people who could've been otherwise exposed to them before they their owners pass on. Oh well! It'll keep the street rodders happy. sick.gif

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Dave@Moon</div><div class="ubbcode-body">

And (worst of all) the early car's loss. So many people who could've been otherwise exposed to them before they their owners pass on. Oh well! It'll keep the street rodders happy. sick.gif </div></div>

The rodders go after the old stuff because they have taste.

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I usually post over in the Olds forum, but I've been following this thread with great interest, so here's my $0.02 on the newer cars. Since I didn't attend Hershey & contend with the apparent logistical issues, I speak more from my own experience & observations regarding new cars in our hobby as a whole.

Let's face it, a substantial portion of this hobby is driven by nostalgia. I think many hobbyists out there initially get into the old car hobby in part through a desire to recapture a certain special time in their lives when things were perhaps simpler, better, & more carefree. A car from a certain point in one's life can stir some powerful memories- we've all seen that happen at shows. Compared to something static like a photo, or something nebulous like an old song, a car takes people back in time in a manner that very few other things can duplicate.

The elephant in the room is that there are few people alive today that grew up & had significant interactions with pre-war vehicles. Consequently, I think the nostalgic appeal for them is relatively low. That's not to say that these cars have no market or value- there will always be enthusiasts who appreciate the horseless carriages, the brass cars, the genuine classics & other pre-war vehicles for their inherent attributes & charm. However, those who longed to recapture their glory days of dating in dad's Maxwell have long since left this earth.

I had a chance to look at a copy of Hemmings that was probably from the early '70s & was blown away by the number of truly vintage cars in its pages. Where did they all go? Are they all stashed-away in museums? Are they all street rods? Are the owners really, REALLY keeping them away from shows because there are too many newer cars there? Just where are all those old cars???? Or, (sadly) are they languishing in garages & storage buildings because the owners who restored them & loved them have passed-on & the heirs don't quite know what do do with them?

I sometimes wonder if we'll see a similar phenomenon with less-popular postwar cars over the next 25 years or so. I often find myself sitting at a cruise with my '61 Olds & the only people that foam at the mouth over the car are those at least 60 years old!

Vintage car owners are doing themselves & their hobby a terrible disservice if they adopt an attitude that newer cars are somehow unworthy of sharing a show field. If anything, as the nostalgic appeal of a car fades, its owner has an obligation to keep that car in the sunshine as much as possible to show the public that there's a lot more to the old car hobby than 60's muscle cars & rods. Furthermore, it's vital that the hobby continues to attract new blood, & many of those who take their first plunge into old cars will do so not with a pre-war car, or even a tri-five Chevy, but with a car that's special & meaningful to their own circumstances.

I was born in 1967 (I'm no kid....) & missed out on most of the great cars that are hot collectibles today. Only as some of these cars were being driven into the ground by high schoolers in the early 80's did I have a chance to experience them in their faded glory. Otherwise, people in my generation & beyond grew up with downsizing, emission controls, gas crunches, & the 55-mph speed limit. People currently in their 20's have had even less exposure to the older cars.

For a Gen Xer, I suppose I'm somewhat of an anachronism in that all of my cars are older than I am. Nonetheless, I very much enjoy seeing cars from the 70's & 80's at shows, especially if they're stock. So many of those cars were considered throwaway items back then that it's a real treat to see one that's restored, (or more likely well-preserved.)

I attended a cruise recently where somebody brought a 1975 AMC Pacer. The owner practically needed crowd-control barriers to handle all the people that wanted to see the car & talk to him. Why? In addition to not seeing a Pacer in years, I'd guess that just about everybody knew somebody back then that had one! The enthusiasm over that Pacer was amazing, & if that's what it takes to get people exposed & interested in the old car hobby then I'm all for it.

Start restricting these cars & you're cutting the hobby off at the knees. You never know, the guy with the '81 Skylark could have his grandpa's '53 Skylark on blocks in the garage. Discourage him enough & he'll leave the snooty antique people in disgust & turn it into a street rod.

I could certainly see myself acquiring a pre-war car someday, but since I seldom see unmodified examples, I don't know what to look out for, what to ask, where to get parts, etc. If the cars & owners are staying away, few are going to be interested in them.

We owe it to ourselves & to our hobby to be advocates & ambassadors of restoring, preserving, & presenting the wonderful array of cars that we all admire. Start turning people away & we'll be seeing an awful lot of street rods in the next generation.

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61Oldsguy stole my thunder completely! Great, exactly on the money post.

Old cars have also all but gone from local shows too, and I know it's due to the reasons stated above

I have been saying for years that as people age and can no longer do the shows, pass away, etc...the interest in that era of vehicle wains.

For the club to survive, the 25 year rule must be kept. Each year, this allows new members to get involved.

I remember all too well when I started showing my former Superbird in AACA (in 1995) that many members saw these musclecars as simply "used cars". They did not want these cars or the field at AACA meets. I did not let that deter me, but I can see how others could feel slighted.

Back to Hershey. It's a great meet, but it's size is not only an attraction...but a noose. I think the folks that run Hershey do a great job and are owed a dept of thanks. Thanks.

That said, I think one small way to help ease space at the meet is to get rid of the non-judged class. Getting an award from Hershey is like winning the Daytona 500 and having a showfield that is so tight makes it tough on judges, owners and spectators.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Matt M, PA</div><div class="ubbcode-body">

Old cars have also all but gone from local shows too, and I know it's due to the reasons stated above

I have been saying for years that as people age and can no longer do the shows, pass away, etc...the interest in that era of vehicle wains.

</div></div>

Yep, there's no interest an any of that old junk. They were practically giving it away over at the Lodge during the RM auction. I'll help you to understand what's really going on. Everybody with the pre-war stuff now goes to other shows and is active in other clubs. There are 10 times more concours events now then 20 years ago. Those events have somewhere near zero post-72 cars at them. That's fine, the AACA will fill the needs of the 84 k-Car wagon collector.

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I'm not sure if your answer was tongue in cheek but if not..the prices for the brass era stuff were for the most part were way over the estimates! Not just the Limited!

We are starting to see a resurgence of brass cars in AACA and certainly brass car prices have never been stronger. Interest waining? Not from what we have seen! Naturally, we still have a challenge in getting cars to show versus tours but we are working on them both.

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It would appear that the current show field may always be subject to access problems for the forseeable future. The road that borders the show field is a public road and most likely cannot be closed so that both lanes could be used for show cars. For the last two years I have always had to stop and wait for traffic to pass before I could make the left turn out of the Giant Center lot onto this road.

This single file access and waiting for traffic to pass will always be a challenge to the Hershey Region when trying to keep traffic moving. While this is not the biggest reason for the backup of show cars this year, it is an underlying cause for delays. Most major events try their best to make sure traffic can only make right turns into or out of large parking areas. In most cases, making a left turn involves crossing a lane of traffic coming the other way which almost always means having to stop and wait. With a lot of vehicles even a very short stop & wait creates a domino effect on the line of traffic that can add up to hours of waiting in line.

This is probably the reason why traffic seemed to move faster when the car show was in front of the Giant Center even with more show cars (ie no public roads with oncoming traffic and lots of right turns.)

Oh well, should be interesting to see how Hershey Region can overcome these challenges associated with the current show field.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Steve Moskowitz</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I'm not sure if your answer was tongue in cheek but if not..the prices for the brass era stuff were for the most part were way over the estimates! Not just the Limited!

We are starting to see a resurgence of brass cars in AACA and certainly brass car prices have never been stronger. Interest waining? Not from what we have seen! Naturally, we still have a challenge in getting cars to show versus tours but we are working on them both.

</div></div>

The sarcasm was directed as this notion (by more than one poster) that the old stuff was all wasting away in storage. Gradually losing it's popularity (except to be rodded, of course) as the 100 year old owners kicked the bucket. All pre-1960 automobiles are currently bringing record prices. You'll note from the auction prices that pre-1910 cars are bringing obscene money:

http://www.rmauctions.com/AuctionResults.cfm?SaleCode=HF07

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Quote: "The road that borders the show field is a public road and most likely cannot be closed so that both lanes could be used for show cars."

Charlie that road (Hockersville) was closed for the entire day for the show car entrance and exit.

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Maybe the reason the older people complain about the newer cars is because AACA keeps changing their policy. It was 1929 and older back in the 60's; then they said they one allow one model year every 2 years, but, definitely stop at 1940.

At that time another national car club started up to take the newer cars (1941 and up). This new club took off very well. I had a 41 Chevy and joined that club. AACA saw the $$ and decided to change the philosopy again to go 25 years old.

Wonder when the HCCA will start allowing newer cars after 1915 since they will certainly die out soon.

Why stop at 25 years old? I like a lot of the 2007 cars and I am sure many other people would like to "see" them also. After all who has seen all the new models? I suggest that all cars of all years be allowed, then anyone who likes cars will be happy. It would be interesting if a new car could score enough points to get 1st.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">At that time another national car club started up to take the newer cars (1941 and up). This new club took off very well. I had a 41 Chevy and joined that club. AACA saw the $$ and decided to change the philosopy again to go 25 years old. </div></div>

All of this was done and over with before I got out of junior high school. I'll be 50 in April. Today you'd have to be over 70 to have actively opposed any of these changes within the club. At that you would've been about 25 years old at the time, and probably not exactly the voice of God within the club.

There are hundreds of car clubs in the U.S. If there isn't a club exclusive enuogh for the owner of any car, they are free to start their own. (I used to belong to a club that defiined itself to a single <span style="text-decoration: underline">motor</span>, <span style="font-style: italic">The Slant Six Club of America</span>.) The AACA is a big tent group that supports the <span style="text-decoration: underline">whole</span> hobby. I feel sorry for people who do not understand the implications of undermining that, especially when they implicitly demand to do so out of their own automotive prejudices.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Ron Green</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Quote: "The road that borders the show field is a public road and most likely cannot be closed so that both lanes could be used for show cars."

Charlie that road (Hockersville) was closed for the entire day for the show car entrance and exit. </div></div>

Ron, thank you for correcting me on that!

I am puzzled as to why there was traffic on that road when I was trying to make the left turn onto it if it was closed.

It appears that some traffic snuck or was let through.

This has happened to me personally the last two year running so I though because of the traffic that the road was open. My mistake.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: hwellens</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Maybe the reason the older people complain about the newer cars is because AACA keeps changing their policy. It was 1929 and older back in the 60's; then they said they one allow one model year every 2 years, but, definitely stop at 1940.

</div></div>

The "older people complain" is misconception. I just turned 43. I was in high school in the early 80s and my friends and I thought that the new cars at the time were complete POS. Everybody was in to the 60s stuff.

Successful clubs work over the long haul because all the members share a common interest that bind them. It will be very interesting to see what the common interest is between the guy with the 32 ford and the guy with the 82 Chevette.

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The older cars are still about and recycle from collections onto the market. And there must certainly be more , many more in driveable condition now than when I was fortuately able to visit your country in 1980. I walked past many cars then in collections now dispersed, which here I would have spent a day imprinting every detail to memory.

The reasons people like their particular car should always be interesting, even when that car could never be your obsession. If every man wanted the same old car or the same spouse there might be a world war to the last standing.(tongue in cheek, of course). We must always respect people's right to their own interests. And while different ages and types fit together well in local clubs, there is merit in having events for specific types and eras. It seems that HCCA does this well. I confess that I had been a member of AACA for some years when I was guest of a friend at the 1980 Glidden. And Antique Automobile, which used to have fascinating features on such as Richlieu, the Lever engine of the Elcar, and the work of Miles Harold Carpenter, but had become full of show pictures of late model cars which had never fascinated me when I was a kid as had the cars of the 20's and earlier that were still in daily use on the road here till the late 50's. I had paid a life membership for HCCA, and while at Auburn then the board of ACD had accepted my suggestion and created a paid life membership. It really was a (beep) pest of a process sending annual dues through the banking system, and I confess that then I was so disappointed to see cars of the 30's at the Glidden, ( and trailered there ), that I just never renewed my membership again. Nevertheless, I was enlightened on that trip by three notable people. When I visited Joe Kaufmann, the Duesenberg specialist who was then restoring a Mercer 6 for a friend, I found that Joe had sold his own Duesenberg, but kept two T Fords, which he explained were the most enjoyable cars for tours. Then Ralph Buckley told me that a restored 34 Ford V8 phaeton would buy the best L-head Mercer Raceabout in the world then, because the age group of people who had money to spend on the hobby then had been in college when the early Ford V8 came on the market. Ralph left me to stay with Fred Hoch, and Fred took me for a ride in a low mileage unrestored 1910 T Ford, and explained how that car would be destroyed by restoration, that its value and interest was that it was a well preserved example of the way it came from the factory.

It really has merit in some events to separate interests by category, particularly large events which people come to from vast distances. It is not that any category is superior to any other; but it does give people the ability to see more easily what really concerns them.

I hope I can make the opportunity to go to Hershey some day.

Regards, Ivan Saxton

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> I hope I can make the opportunity to go to Hershey some day.

</div></div>

We all do Ivan! It would be an honor to shake your hand. Maybe we should all get together and start a "Bring Ivan to the States" Fund? smile.gif

Wayne

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: alsancle</div><div class="ubbcode-body">It will be very interesting to see what the common interest is between the guy with the 32 ford and the guy with the 82 Chevette. </div></div>

How about: "The both like antique cars"...

Or is this a trick question?

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: R W Burgess</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I know this will open up a can of worms, and this is no disrepect to the women of our club who like aq setdown breakfast, but the picture below shows how one (or two smile.gif ) can easily miss the long lines at the show field....... </div></div>

Ok Wayne, I'll bite. Very nice looking car in the picture, but what else am I missing?...

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Steve, this thread started out as tirades about how hard it was to get on the show field, and, in fact, it was at 9-11-12 o'clock. The picture I posted above shows a very empty field with plenty of turning space.

"The early bird catches the worm", they say! smile.gif

Wayne

post-31395-143137952134_thumb.jpg

post-31395-143137952137_thumb.jpg

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I went to this show with me son and we had a GREAT time. Yes, we parked, like forever from the show and walked and walked just to get in. Yes, I saw vendor spaces not selling anything and thought it would be great to buy one just to park on so that I could bring my wife who can't walk well. I thought the gas and electric carts were great, again thinking of my wife.(And my knees :-).

But I sure am glad that I went.....if I listened to all the complaining that has gone on in this forum, I might never have gone.

You worry about bringing in new people....look in the mirror to see why they aren't coming.

Honestly............................................

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: stock_steve</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: alsancle</div><div class="ubbcode-body">It will be very interesting to see what the common interest is between the guy with the 32 ford and the guy with the 82 Chevette. </div></div>

How about: "The both like antique cars"...

Or is this a trick question? </div></div>

It's not a trick question. It's a trick answer, one that resides in us who do enjoy comprehensive displays of automotive history.

It's a very different experience going to the Philadelphia Art Museum and going to the Warhol Museum, one is diverse in it's display and the other is highly focused. The perspective that diversity provides to both the participant and the spectator is priceless. Also the diversity of exposure provides avenues of discovery that some treasure, and others (in their own mind) have outgrown. If one is so averse to new experience, perhaps Hershey isn't for you.

It's sad that so many in the pre-war community proclaim such aversion with pride. It's encouraging and hopeful that so few (if any) of the newer antique afficienados do the same. I know which camp will provide growth in both the overall hobby interest and in the pre-war cars as well as time takes it's toll on all of us, and it isn't the camp of intolerance.

============

Alsuncle, there most certainly <span style="font-weight: bold"><span style="text-decoration: underline">is</span></span> a common interest among '32 Fords and Chevettes, and among Duryeas, Duesenbergs, and Whizzers as well. I hope you find it someday like most of us have. smile.gif

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1937hd45,

I might as well jump into the fray as well....

As I said earlier, I laughed when I first saw a Chevette drive onto an AACA Showfield.... But I did go over and take a look and remembered "the days of my youth" when I looked at it.

I think that my 1929 Model A Phaeton is a really nice car, But.... when it was new it was just a run of the mill cheap car designed to be low cost transportation.

I'll bet that Chevette turns heads on the showfield in 50 year or so.

The great thing about viewing automotive history on the showfield is to be able to look at ALL of the years and observe the changes. I love my car, I really want to buy a brass car.... but I enjoy looking at most of the later cars as well. I just wish I could figure out a way to have more time to see them all.

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They made sone great Modified Stock Cars out of Chevetts and I watched them on Saturday nights, when one is on an AACA show field in class 24A chances are I'll look at it. I'm just clueless what a street verson looks like. Life is short, I only look at things I'm interested in.

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We didn't see the (ahem) "'Vette" this year. Hemmings took a picture of it last year at Hershey, though, ref:

http://blog.hemmings.com/wp-content/uploads/2006/10/Hersheyantics_6127_resized.jpg

From: http://blog.hemmings.com/index.php/2006/...ers-of-hershey/

Here's what they said about it:

"...Another show find - one I’m sure won’t get into the magazine because a certain Lentinello can’t stand them. Joseph Krajnak, the owner of this 1976 Chevette, said he bought it as a beater, but has received enough positive responses at cruise-ins that he decided to reserve it for show. I figure, if Gremlins competed against them and Gremlins are so cool right now, then why not Chevettes?..."

That Gremlin's nice, Jay!

Looks like "that double-decker bus" made it into their Hershey '07 review: http://blog.hemmings.com/

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Why stop at 25 years old? I like a lot of the 2007 cars and I am sure many other people would like to "see" them also. After all who has seen all the new models? I suggest that all cars of all years be allowed, then anyone who likes cars will be happy. It would be interesting if a new car could score enough points to get 1st</div></div>

<span style="font-weight: bold">NO WAY!!!</span> We have so many cars at Hershey now that if you opened it up to allow brand new cars you'd be having people entering their vehicles in the show at Hershey for the convenience of parking, it would be heavily abused and there would be a bigger mess than what we have now.

The 25 year rule prevents that. Although there are some against the 25 year rule, many of the current oponents to the 25 year rule seem to forget that their outlooks were probably different when it involved a car from their generation.

MCHinson: You're right, I do feel that there were more people there as spectators. I had a steady stream of people there to the point where I didn't really get the chance where I could get away from the truck. I know a few other vehicle owners that I talked to that said the same thing.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Dave@Moon</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: stock_steve</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: alsancle</div><div class="ubbcode-body">It will be very interesting to see what the common interest is between the guy with the 32 ford and the guy with the 82 Chevette. </div></div>

How about: "The both like antique cars"...

Or is this a trick question? </div></div>

It's not a trick question. It's a trick answer, one that resides in us who do enjoy comprehensive displays of automotive history.

It's a very different experience going to the Philadelphia Art Museum and going to the Warhol Museum, one is diverse in it's display and the other is highly focused. The perspective that diversity provides to both the participant and the spectator is priceless. Also the diversity of exposure provides avenues of discovery that some treasure, and others (in their own mind) have outgrown. If one is so averse to new experience, perhaps Hershey isn't for you.

It's sad that so many in the pre-war community proclaim such aversion with pride. It's encouraging and hopeful that so few (if any) of the newer antique afficienados do the same. I know which camp will provide growth in both the overall hobby interest and in the pre-war cars as well as time takes it's toll on all of us, and it isn't the camp of intolerance.

============

Alsuncle, there most certainly <span style="font-weight: bold"><span style="text-decoration: underline">is</span></span> a common interest among '32 Fords and Chevettes, and among Duryeas, Duesenbergs, and Whizzers as well. I hope you find it someday like most of us have. smile.gif </div></div>

You know, I noticed that the Chevette owners seemed much more open minded, tolerant and diverse then those elistist, closed minded and "experience averse" old car owners. Not only that, I think that some of those early car guys are *gasp* Republicans !!! :-)

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Let me just start off by saying that I have been attending the Hershey swap meet and show way before I even started showing our antique cars there probably for over the past 10 years. The last 4 years we have shown our cars on the show field and have noticed the mentioned changes taking place over the years. I understand that running such a large event is not an easy task and my hat goes off to those volunteers and workers who take on such an amazing feat. However, with that being said, the AACA and/or the Hershey Region seem to have lost sight of the fact what the AACA stands for..... Antique car preservation. For instance, why were the show cars that were supposed to be on asphalt (supposedly 2006 was a one year only happening)actually on grass again and the vendors were on the asphalt? Personally, I spend an extraordinary amount of time getting my vehicle cleaned and shined for this event only to have grass and mud thrown up in the wheel wells pulling onto the field. In years past, the vendors were on the grass while the show cars were on the asphalt. If this is how our expensive vehicles are going to be treated, please do not look for me at this show in years to come! God help us if it had been raining during the show as no one would have been able to safely get out of the mud hole without having to be towed out and then the possibly having damage occur from being yanked out of the mud.

Secondly, I was a little upset with the person parking my class as he had me move around about 3 times before I got aggrivated and stopped my car in the middle of the row till he knew exactly where I was supposed to go. It got tiresome moving from one spot, back to my original spot, and then back to the spot where I was just at. If you have written out who is supposed to park where prior to them arriving, please do it or have a name card down on the ground where you are supposed to park like they do at the Grand National events.

While I am on the subject of parking, I thought this year was extremely tight parking as I could barely get out of my vehicle without having it rub doors with the car next to me, and I am a skinny 31 year old male. There was a person who arrived later in the morning who parked in our class with a Daytona who had to have someone else park his vehicle because it was so tight that he would not have been able to get out opening his door due to his size. I understand some cars are larger and wider than others but this needs to be taken into consideration when the planning is done. Also, there seemed to have been cars parked in the isles. This event is by preregistering only so why was not enough space left for them to park in their rows? The above items left me with a disorganized view of the show this year.

Next, and maybe this is just my view but others have mentioned it as well, why is the show cars so far away from the center of the event? Years past, the show cars have been the focal point of the show located in the center, next to the Giant Center or the Hershey Stadium where plenty of food vendors were present. The food vendors were quite lacking at the show field this year even though it was an improvement over none from last year. When my father and I went to go shopping through the vendors on Sat morning after our class was judged, it seemed like 90% of the vendors were gone from the swap meet and this was at 11 AM on Sat morning. Other spaces in the swap meet seems to be rented by people that just wanted to get a closer parking space for their daily drivers so they didn't have to walk that far to drop off parts to their vehicle.

Again, I have noticed the changes over the past couple of years and I understand that last year was a transition period which was supposed to be corrected by this year with the show cars being on paved ground. From a spectator point and a participant stand point, it seems like the AACA is catoring to the vendors instead of catoring to the vehicle owners who belong to the club. Granted, the vendors pay more money but the vendors is not who makes up the AACA, it is people with antique cars like me and my neighbor down the street. Also, the majority of your clientelle is older people yet you have them park so far away that it is difficult for them to walk to the show and swap meet. No thought of transportation was made available to these people in the form of busses or shuttles. Again, just a thought for next year.

I hope this is just a temporary thing but if this trend continues, as much as I hate to say it, the Hershey meet might soon meet its demise as I see a downward spiral trend starting. Personally, I prefer asphalt parking as it is cleaner and you are on solid ground making the cleaning of your undercarriage a lot easier on the owner. The grass parking is nice for pictures and giving shade with some trees but at the same point, if it rains (and Hershey is know for its rainy shows) you are going to have a lot more unhappy people when they have to pay extra money to have their vehicles pulled out of the mud. I know from experience with having a high performance muscle car that when you let the clutch out in first gear, the rear tires will spin on any kind of wet or soggy ground. Last year it took me over 4 hours to clean the mud out from my rear wheel wells just from leaving the grass show field since I was parked in a soft section. Personally, I could certainly think of better time to be spent than cleaning dirt and grass out from an area which was pristine only a couple hours prior.

I know the AACA is trying to recruit younger members and this is coming from a 31 year old member so I hope the younger generation input does not fall on deaf ears as this will be the last time that my vehicle sees the grass show field at Hershey unless it gets changed back to paved ground for the show cars.

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Bob, I'm embarrassed to say that this is the only picture I took of it. Even looks like Bruce bending over the rail. Sometimes, one needs to slow down for the quality pictures of life. Sorry! frown.gif

I understand he fired it up at some point during the week. Did anyone witness that?

Wayne

DSC02766.jpg

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Very cool! One thing you could always count on at the Hershey Show was seeing some stuff you wouldn't see anywhere else. This year it was the milk/delivery trucks which were fabulous. Last year it was the race cars. I hope that sort of thing that can continue year after year. I really hope that "diversity" means stuff like this and not different colors of some particular econo-box made during the oil crunch.

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NOBODY ASKED ME EITHER..... but here you go:

I liked parking on the grass. I thought that we were parked too closely together but it was enjoyable none the less. Yes it was a bit dusty, but for all of you AACA members that brought your "living room couches" out for judging, dust happens in the outside world.

The judging was as expected, so we really didn't expect anything there especially when only one aspect of the car was pointed out. We laughed about it and pressed on with viewing the cars there. The crowds loved the car, and I really liked the drive in and out where the spectators lined the road the view the cars. That was almost parade-like and was a lot of fun. Unfortunately, many vendors had left by noon Saturday - but we found the only bottle of transmission fluid for sale that day!

So all-in-all, we had a great trip. We toured the Gettysburg battlefield in the Cadillac, and saw the new monuments; visited with my brother and his 1949 Cadillac; and enjoyed the show. Again - the people enjoyed seeing the car and talking to us about it. I must add that I was so surprised at how good the food was at the banquet. A veteran of many KofC banquets where the food was "Navy-quality" I was impressed. The dinner company was also great and I enjoyed talking and bantering with the Hershey Region folks there.

Bravo-Zulu Hershey Region. Your best credit is that "we had a great time."

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