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rmartens

Garage Floor Epoxy? Other Ideas?

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I'll be moving into a new house soon, and may have enough time to finish the garage floor before we move in. The concrete floor is a few months old--I assume that's cured enough for applying a surface treatment.

What are my options in terms of paint? Epoxy? Anyone had any luck with specific products? What'll it cost me to do a 20' by 20' garage?

I've heard that some finishes don't like heat, and others have to cure for a long time before hot tires don't scrub the paint off...

All ideas appreciated!

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I used an $80/gal epoxy about 9 years ago on my shop floor. I've since put it through Hell with no apparent damage. 2 coats rollered onto a 1300 sq. ft. floor cost about $400. One thing is that the floor must be shot blasted or etched with muriatic acid to give it a proper "tooth" to hold the paint. Failure to do this step will most likely result in peeling..........Bob

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I had my garage floor coated with epoxy 7 years ago before we moved in. It was new concrete and I paid a paint company to prep and apply. Since then it has suffered serious abuse and every type of spill you can imagine with no peeling or damage other than some surface scratches and scuff marks. If I wanted to get serious with cleaning I could probably get it back to about 95% of its original appearance. Best garage investment I ever made.

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Rustoleum floor epoxy is what they use in airplane hangars and in all those shiny professional NASCAR shops. It's scary expensive and very prep dependent, but nothing will work better. We used it in the shop where I used to work and nothing stuck to it, tires wouldn't stain it and metal wheels on floor jacks wouldn't scratch or chip it.

If you choose it, make sure you get the highly toxic 2-part pro-grade epoxy, not the homeowner-grade stuff they sell at Home Depot.

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You're right about the cheap homeowner's stuff.

I used it on my new shop floor after it cured for a few months. Now it is 3 years old & it is all tire marks & peeling areas where my old cars drip gasoline.

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USED BEST CONCRETE COATING FROM HOME DEPOT ON NEW WAREHOUSE FLOOR BEFORE ANY TRAFFIC, WAREHOUSE NOW OCCUPIED BY HEAVY MACHINE SHOP SUPPLIER (OIL SPILLS, FORK TRUCK, ECT.) RECOATED AFTER GOOD PRESSURE WASHER CLEANING AFTER ONE YEAR, SOME STAINS AND TIRE MARKS WOULD NOT COME OUT BUT ALL IN ALL NOT BAD NOW GOING ON 3 YEARS OLD. DOES NOT LEAVE THAT HIGH SHINE BUT I SUPPOSE UNDER RESIDENTIAL TRAFFIC WOULD BE GOOD BALANCE BETWEEN COST AND FLOOR PROTECTION. ALSO WAS WARNED FROM CONCRETE MAN ABOUT THICK COATINGS THAT MADE FLOOR ULTRA SLICK WHEN DAMP OR WET.. WILL SOON REPLACE GARAGE AT HOME, GOING WITH SAME PRODUCT. BUT THATS JUST MY OPINION

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Guest BJM

Just the thread I needed as well. Here is my dilemma. I have a huge, heated 3 car garage. Like an idiot I painted a 1987 Mazda truck in it over an extended fall. Red dusty paint went everywhere. I had NO IDEA it would be THAT bad, but it is.

I like a nice garage since I spend a lot of free time out there. I have 3 body off frame projects going. I have parts stacked everywhere. I am basically going to "restore" 1/3 of the garge at a time. Sweeping, dusting, restacking pulled parts and I felt this was the logical time to apply a high quality epoxy floor paint.

I have seen the Rustoleum product at the Home Store. You guys are saying it's a bad product? I won't buy. I am thinking just use a high quality floor paint in light gray "for now" given that this garage will see a lot of restoration work over the next 10 years before more pristine restored vehicles (hopefully) occupy it's space.

Please advise -

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Unsure how successful you would be doing 1/3 of the floor at a time. I also have a 4 car heated garage that I use for working on the vehicles (non storage). I set up a paint booth with plastic and a thru the roof exhaust fan to avoid what you learned in painting the truck.

I wouldn't use a cheap floor paint as you are just wasting your time. Do it right if your going to coat it. It is all in the prep work and quality of the material just like everything else on a car. I used the POR-15 epoxy and it is tough stuff and I use and abuse it hard. The smell of the clear coat was so strong it brought out the fire company however that is another story. I have done at least 3 restorations on it and a lot of major and minor repairs. A few scratches here and there from my own stupidity.

If I had it to do over again, and when my restoration days were slowing down (like now), I would have waited until the bulk of the heavy restorations were done before coating the floor. I would now seriously consider installing the locking plastic squares in lieu of painting.

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Guest BJM

Thanks Ron. I will just leave it bare, which is OK. I mop it once per week after sweeping. I just like things neat and tidy as much as possible, and I think it would eventually add value to a property sale.

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I used I think it was the 3M 2 Part Epoxy Floor paint from Home Depot in the garage we had added on and before I started my restoration it has held up pretty well. But right now I have it all covered up with cardboard to protect it from overspray etc. But once I am finished with restoring Old Bessie I will be trashing some of the the cardboard. With that said I am not sure what it looks like now under the cardboard. It will be sometime before it comes up.

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I have successfully used large blue tarp's duct taped together during the winter to protect the floor which seem to work. Where do you find the cardboard and how thick is it?

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Ron,

From odds and ends on the cardboard like from new patio set, grill, fridge etc. It seems to be easier on the feet then walking on concert.

Tarps sound like a good idear to. But is it not slippery?

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Ron, If you want big cardboard go to an appliance dealer. They will usually be happy to give you all you want. Card board makes a BIG difference in comfort when you have to lay on a cold cement floor. The only draw back is a creeper doesn't roll as well..........Bob

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Tom,I use the same tarp's every winter so they are no longer slippery especially where I melted or burned through with the trouble-light. I don't do any major work (or try not to) in the summer time.

Bob, I can see how cardboard would help the feet, etc as I have a large cashier mat in front of the workbench and it really helps the legs. Just keep the welder far away. smirk.gif

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I've got my '41 Packard Clipper project on a "blue tarp" currently to protect my Rustoleum epoxy. Seems to be working pretty well! It is a little slippery...

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By spring it won't be slippy anymore. When I do grinding I duct tape clear plastic to the tarp and garage walls or make a wall with furring strips to keep all the crap from going everywhere.

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Guest BJM

Cardboard works great. It soaks up the oil, etc before it hits the concrete, lasts quite a while then you simply cut up and toss.

We have a local grocery store for smaller boxes, but once you cut a corner it out it lays out pretty well.

I put it under the motors on the engine stand as well.

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i've used epoxy paint from MAB in a diesel repair shop. after 5 years there was only minor damage. plan to use the same in home garage. its pretty pricy though but worth the money. nothing worse than cheap paint

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Well I know there are some people who say not to use the rustoleum from Home Depot, but I used it on my garage floor and am very satisfied with it. I am restoring a 1927 truck and the only problem is melting steel when using the torch. I have some dark spots from that. I would suggest using the color flakes that come with the product, otherwise the floor is slippery when wet(to smooth). It's a year old now with lots of traffic and it still looks new. Just follow the directions on the box.

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Ron,

It has now been about 5 years since you did your garage floor with Por-15.

A couple of questions:

How did it hold up?

Would you do it again?

Thanks,

George Rohrbach

Unsure how successful you would be doing 1/3 of the floor at a time. I also have a 4 car heated garage that I use for working on the vehicles (non storage). I set up a paint booth with plastic and a thru the roof exhaust fan to avoid what you learned in painting the truck.

I wouldn't use a cheap floor paint as you are just wasting your time. Do it right if your going to coat it. It is all in the prep work and quality of the material just like everything else on a car. I used the POR-15 epoxy and it is tough stuff and I use and abuse it hard. The smell of the clear coat was so strong it brought out the fire company however that is another story. I have done at least 3 restorations on it and a lot of major and minor repairs. A few scratches here and there from my own stupidity.

If I had it to do over again, and when my restoration days were slowing down (like now), I would have waited until the bulk of the heavy restorations were done before coating the floor. I would now seriously consider installing the locking plastic squares in lieu of painting.

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I am interested too. Also if anyone used the widely advertised U Coat It system, Todd C

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George,

I found the receipt the other day and actually my floor just turned 9 years old. Unfortunately I inadvertently made a mistake on my post as I used U-Coat It and not POR-15. I used the POR for my Amphicar bilge and undercarriage and had the U-Coat It Company do the floor rather than me.

<O:pThe U-Coat It overall has held up ok however I use it extremely hard and have complete 2 or 3 more restorations since the previous post. If I had to do it all over again I would probably use either locking plastic squares or vinyl floor tiles.

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to keep clean-easy sweep-2or 3 coats of concrete sealer-youll be suprised at how slick it will be.very easy to apply.clean well -preperation is everything like most painting.use a mineral base not water-will also need resporator while using-stuff stinks but will hold up.t.nugent roa 12969.

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