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Wayne said it better than I did:

"You must remember that joining a small local AACA region can open up avenues of new friendships, touring places you've never seen before, in your own backyard. These new friends can put you onto car deals you never thought possible before. People/friends is where it's at."

That is what I think I have been trying to say. It was over 20 years before I attended my first National Meet. Now, I am at the point in my life that I enjoy the National Events. When I was younger, I attended local shows, local tours, local meetings, and had a great time and met many friends. Most are older than I am, but not all of them are. Local Regions or Chapters have a lot to offer to their members.

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And keep in mind that this is a very large hobby, with many, many people. Just as in "the real world", everyone is different. Please don't generalize all AACA members, or all old car hobbyists, as being arrogant and not interested in you or your car. You CAN'T assume that everyone will be your best friend, but you CAN assume that you will find a best friend in the AACA, and that there will be more than enough car guys out there that will help you with your questions. Just as we are doing here.

In all fairness to judges, they have A LOT of cars to judge, and spending time answering a lot of questions is not in the cards... if they want to complete their judging duties. That does not give them permission to be rude, of course. Also remember, they are volunteering their time to judge. If you find a judge that DOES know a lot about 1957 Plymouths, ask him/her if you could talk with them later, after the judging is finished. You may get all the help you need when they are not pushed for time.

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Just a follow up, I have not personally judged at AACA but I have in the Pontiac Oakland Club and the judging system is patterned after AACA. In the Pontiac club the owner is not to talk to the judges about details while judging for this very reason, so maybe that was part of the issue for 57 Plymouth and he should have asked to speak to the judges later. Further, the scoring or points are not to be discussed on the field either, which seems illogical in that you do not know what is being deducted or for what reason so you can correct it for next time. Maybe that was part of 57 Plymouth's communication with the judges.

That said, however, I still stand by my concern with too many brusque attitudes in our hobby, especially to newcomers. We all need to work on being ambassadors for the hobby and try to bring in new blood, especially if we want anyone to see the benefit of restoring or preserving a car rather than modifying it and joining the street rod crowd. Here in my area it now takes a very dedicated soul to avoid just dropping in a 350 V8 and going cruising because that is all you see. The AACA seems now my only refuge for a goal of authenticity without extremes and snobbishness. Would like to hear others on this, thanks, Todd

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I have several responses:

I don't need to pay membership dues in a club to find people to associate with. This dichotomy of ideals is why I am leaving many Masonic bodies, it simply isn't worth the expense to go to meetings. If I can only talk with car guys in the AACA by "buying in" then I don't need to be in.

No magazine is worth $35 per year. Don't say that the club newsletter is worth the price alone. Unless this magazine is all tech articles every month, it is not worth $35 per year.

I don't care what club it is, NCRS, Pontiac Oakland, Plymouth Owner's, AACA, or any other club; if I cannot talk to the judge while he is looking at my car, that judge needs to walk away and send over a better judge. If I am not worthy of your time when you are around my car, you are not worthy of being around my car. If you are offended that I want to talk to you, then get the #### away from my car.

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<span style="font-weight: bold">Did your mommy tell you it was ok to interrupt your teacher while she was trying to grade your paper?</span>

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: 57plymouth</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><span style="font-size: 8pt">I have several responses:

I don't need to pay membership dues in a club to find people to associate with. This dichotomy of ideals is why I am leaving many Masonic bodies, it simply isn't worth the expense to go to meetings. If I can only talk with car guys in the AACA by "buying in" then I don't need to be in.

No magazine is worth $35 per year. Don't say that the club newsletter is worth the price alone. Unless this magazine is all tech articles every month, it is not worth $35 per year.

I don't care what club it is, NCRS, Pontiac Oakland, Plymouth Owner's, AACA, or any other club; if I cannot talk to the judge while he is looking at my car, that judge needs to walk away and send over a better judge. If I am not worthy of your time when you are around my car, you are not worthy of being around my car. If you are offended that I want to talk to you, then get the #### away from my car.

</span>

</div></div>

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: 57plymouth</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> if I cannot talk to the judge while he is looking at my car, that judge needs to walk away and send over a better judge. If I am not worthy of your time when you are around my car, you are not worthy of being around my car. If you are offended that I want to talk to you, then get the #### away from my car.</div></div>

Let's look at this from a judge's perspective. There are usually a ton of cars to judge in a set time. If a judge takes the time to talk to every car owner in that class, it's going to take forever to judge the cars which in turn throws everything else judging-related off schedule. I've seen this happen in Oldsmobile Club of America national judging as a meet chairman, and ended up going out on the showfield myself, clipboard in hand, at 7 PM to help those judges catch up their classes so we could tally scores and assign the proper awards to the proper cars. <span style="font-weight: bold">I didn't get any dinner that night. But those cars and owners were worthy of my time so I did the job.</span>

If I as a judge take time to talk with you, and exclude everyone else who has a car in that class, then the perception of favoritism is going to pop up. I made that mistake myself as a novice OCA judge, and hard feelings over it linger to this day, 19 years later. The guy who missed Best of Class to the other car by 5 points reminds me of it every time he sees me.

I will introduce myself and the judging team, thank the owner for bringing the car, compliment an especially nice display of support items, and wish them luck. No more than that needs be said. I also purposely stay away from the cars in the class I'm assigned to judge until judging starts. That way I can't be accused of picking the winner beforehand.

Now, 57Plymouth. I am one who believes that one should sh*t or get off the pot. I challenge you to volunteer to judge a couple shows, and I don't mean Sunday afternoon beauty contests. I'm talking points judged shows with clearly defined guidelines and standards. Wear a judge's shoes for a day. After dealing with a dozen whiny-asses like you, your tune might change.

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I have judged at hershey before and had approx. 25 cars to judge (in a prior year least was 8 in the rain a couple years ago, 10 cars didn't show up). We as judges are told to try to limit the time to 5 min per car, generaly if taking longer you're probably nit-picking. At that rate, it would take just over 2 hours. Now, you need to add in time for the team captain to review all the car forms, mark them as to what awards they obtained, sign them, compile them by class, and (use to be by awards) now by entry number, collect the indivdual judge's worksheets, and the judge's cards for credit. That took me about 10 minutes this year. If you were judging on the far end of the field, it was pushing a 10 minute wade through the crowd to judge's administration. Then if you were my dad (roughly 5 persons behind me and timed it) a 55 minute wait to get in the door to the ladies that take care of the paperwork. I was with them (no problems with the paperwork, all my "i"s dotted and "t"s crossed) took another approx. 5 minutes. That's a three hour and 20 minute day. Just on the show field. There is also the judge's breakfast which started at 7am and we're were lined up and waiting for at 6am, which by the way we have to pay for. Then following that, the team captains (i was one this year) will go to the show field and check to verify if all thier cars are there, look for misparked cars, I talked to other team captains that were also judging cars in the same classes (the teams and classes were broke down to those taking care of the junior/senior cars and those doing preservation and repeat preservation) to make sure everyone was "on the same page". We were not allowed to return to judge's admin until after 11am to make sure cars made it onto the field. I knew there were still some coming on a few minutes after and I kept my team on the field until about 11:30 and walking the entyway to make sure no other cars for my classes entered without my knowledge. As it was, there was one a few minutes after 11 that arrived, I took care of our team's paperwork to give the guy some time to clean the car or whatever he needed to do instead of rushing right over and judging it.

So short version of a team captain's (my) day at Hershey:

Arrive at judge's breakfast at 6AM

Breakfast at 7am

after breakfast, 1/2 mile walk to show field and my classes.

Started checking on which cars were there and talking to other team captains in area.

10am start judging process, ending after admin. about 1 PM. Cars already exiting show field.

If I would have spent the time for the vehicles that didn't show would have added about another 20-30 minutes which would have push the finish time to about 1:30pm. If I remember correctly vehicles are allowed to leave at 2pm. If everyone my team had to judge showed up and I spent 5 minutes with each owner telling them about every deduction, which would require all my team members to be invovled in as they know exactly what it was for (I might know it was a defect on a door, where they know it was a dent on the door, etc.) On the days (in the past at Hershey) when the team has 20 to 25 cars to judge, if your car happened to be the last one we got to, you won't be seeing us until about the 1:20pm to 2:10pm area.

The ladies at Hershey had to handle and enter the infromation for over 1,500 cars from what I heard the attendance was to be. And they need to be done by 5pm.

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Well, I am certainly sorry to have said anything on this subject. I earlier criticized the old timers to side with someone who:

A. Doesn't think it is worth joining an club to meet car people and does not want to be in any AACA event unless it is for free.

B. Is irritated that I would be complementary of the fine AACA magazine and suggest it was worth the money.

C. Does not like that rules apply to the judging procedure if they are not at his instant service.

Gee, no communication problem anywhere here, sorry I said anything.

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Since I am now an outcast, I doubt you will read this post.

Thank you gentlemen for showing me many things. Obviously I am not a good fit for the AACA.

I'm sure your magazine is lovely. I trust it brings you enlightenment and hope, and I am more happy that you are able to afford a periodical at the rate of $35 annually.

If I could have found ANYPLACE on this website that stated that the owner of the car cannot speak to the judge, much of the discord and bitterness this thread has tragically grown would not have taken place.

I understand that the judges are very busy and have a job to do. Perhaps the OWNERS should be more concientious by getting to the show on time, and staying until it is over. Novaman's post seems to me to imply that the owner's are rushing the judges along.

Clearly my tone of prose does not convey accurately my feelings about the car hobby. I want to LEARN, and meet other car owners. I can easily spend far too much time talking with owners and learning tips and tricks from them. I also want my car correct, but I don't give a tiny gnat's *** about trophies. Winning a $5 trophy isn't the point. I want to get it right. I've won more than my share of trophies, and they all sit around getting dusty. I really really REALLY care about dash plaques. Why? Because they prove that I've been there! I look at my dash plaques sticking on the walls in my shop and remember the fun I had, or the rain I sat through, or the time it snowed on me at a show, or whatever happened at that particular show. They are what I collect. I personally would prefer paper certificates for winners, they are easily filed and take up less space. It's not about winning, it's the experience.

Sorry I started so much anger in the forum. I only want to learn. If that is too much trouble, I guess I missed the point.

The original purpose of this thread was to discuss where the younger members are. I may be speaking out of turn again, but I think that I fit into the younger category. The younger people want to learn. Maybe the AACA should have an on-line course where we can find that knowledge. Maybe there should be some option that we can use at shows to learn about our cars instead of being chastized for trying to learn.

But what do I know, I'm a smart azz.

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It not that the car owners are rushing the judges but there is more to the judging than just walking up to a vehicle, looking at it, write down a score and move on. There are things that ned to be done ahead of time and after the judges on the field are done looking at the cars need to do before turing in thier stuff. All needs to be done so the admin can get thier work done so the awards can be gi\ven at the banquet and not the next day.

More later . Boss just walked in.

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57 Plymouth,

Please consider visiting a local AACA Chapter or Region meeting in your area. I think that you are missing the point. <span style="font-weight: bold">That</span> is where you meet people who can and will teach you more about all facets of the old car hobby.

You seem to be missing the point that I have tried to convey earlier. Walking up to a judge at a National Meet and asking the judge to explain how you should restore your car is like walking up to an umpire on the field at the World Series and asking him to teach you how to play baseball. The local regions and chapters are the farm teams.... that is where you will find what you seem to be looking for.

I was a member of the club for 20 years before I ever attended the Fall Meet at Hershey. I plan to be there every year from now on.

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I had a nice phone conversation with 57Plymouth. He took me up on my offer to chat by phone. I am happy to report that he is not the ogre that he might have led you to believe. grin.gif

I would characterize him as a young man who has arrived at the stage of his life that he is sincerely interested in making his 1957 Plymouth a correctly restored car, but is frustrated at a lack of information available in his neck of the woods.

He is not yet ready for National Meet Competition, but he really does need a mentor who knows something about Plymouths of around 1957, who hopefully is not too far from Columbia South Carolina. Hopefully, some nice 57 Plymouth owner will be able to show him some stuff at next year's Charlotte Meet, but even better would be if we can find someone with a correctly restored 57 Plymouth that we can introduce him to before then. Anybody out there who wants to help a young man with his Plymouth?

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I wish I could have finished my post before the boss walked in from lunch.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> ... I don't give a tiny gnat's *** about trophies. Winning a $5 trophy isn't the point. .... I really really REALLY care about dash plaques. Why? Because they prove that I've been there! I look at my dash plaques sticking on the walls in my shop and remember the fun I had, or the rain I sat through, or the time it snowed on me at a show, or whatever happened at that particular show. They are what I collect. I personally would prefer paper certificates for winners, they are easily filed and take up less space. It's not about winning, it's the experience. </div></div>

That sounds like me. I know too many people that take car shows <span style="font-weight: bold"><span style="font-size: 14pt">way</span></span> too serious. They get all mad and worked up if they didn't take home a 1st place, best of show, etc. Personally, yes it is nice to take home that trophy but if a $5 trophy is what determines wether or not you enjoyed the show, there's something wrong. That attitude is one of the reasons why when I get done restoring my wagon and hdtp, they are going into the DPC class. I can put the car on the field, get my dash plaque saying I was there, give the car a quick wipe and go enjoy the show the rest of the day.

One thing you may want to do is find a local AACA region, and ask the members there who in the region is a national judge. Then ask that person if he/she would be willing to take a look at your car and point out things that you might need to correct. Most AACA national judges are more than willing to help a car owner in this manner. doing it some eveneing or saturday away from a show will actually allow that person more time to spend with you than would even possiable at a meet. My dad and I have done it for two members of my local region and we spent over an hour with each of them looking at the car, and discussing what the judges are looking for, what you as an owner need it do when you arrive, what factory documention you might need, and what to expect when the judges arrive to judge the car.

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Glad he took you up on the phone offer. <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I am happy to report that he is not the ogre that he might have led you to believe.</div></div> From his posts I never took him that way. Just that he had a misconcieved notion as to the judging process and what a judge does at a national meet and the amount of time required to perform those duties.

I might be able to get him in touch with someone in central PA if that helps.

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Some of these posts touched on what I see as a big turn off for young people, the fact that there are too many old, aloof owners and officials who take themselves and this hobby way too seriously. They suck the fun out.

The sad part is that the ones at fault will never realize it.

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Well fortunately (and maybe its just this area and the clubs that happen to be here) but I actually have always paid attention since I read these kinds of discussions on here before my car got on the road and at shows!!!

And I have been pleasantly surprised the last two years that I have seen very few like that. Perhaps its because they find out I have one TOO. Who knows. I also dont say that as in they would place themselves above me for having something I dont, just maybe I have the same type of thing they do and have put as much time and effort as they have (or maybe as much as theyve put hard-earned money if thats the case) and thus they say "ok so this kid will respect these vehicles and not be touching or worse damaging things as if he were entitled to".

All I know is everyone's real friendly round these parts! And I just CANT get enough of the stories, especially those of mayhem-filled adventures (or MIS-adventures!) laugh.gif

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I used to get the nay-sayers all the time....

Once just to prove a point I drove a friend's '09 Model T Touring on a tour.. with no trouble.

That got alot of them thinking.. especially considering I was only 16 at the time!

I got my first Model A when I was 15... even tho I'm only 29 now, it seems like I've had it for 40 years.

The nay-sayers just need to wake up and open their minds a bit...

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57, I understand what you're saying in many ways, and don't think that anyone is implying that you should have to "pay to get in" by any means.

If I'm not mistaken by reading your posts, you are concerned in getting your vehicle authentic right??

What has worked for me (and may not work for you) is to get involved in the judging program. If you get involved in the judging program, you can sit through the schools, CJE's and ask all the questions that you want and someone should have the answer, or direct you to someone who can. We also have a very good automotive library where you can research information on your own vehicle. With our library you can either come to Hershey and research the information yourself, or you can have someone else do it for you for a nominal fee. In 2008 all members will have limited research services provided free of charge to all AACA members.

One of the things that my father and I have been doing is that while we were restoring a vehicle, we have started judging in the class where the vehicle will be going into once it is completed. During the process it allows you to

1. Understand the judging responsibilities.

2. Understand the judging system.

3. Be able to learn about the vehicles through judging schools and CJE's.

4. Give you the opportunities to get to know the other team captains and judges and be able to "pick their brains" as to what is right and wrong, and know what they look for when judging.

5. Give you the opportunity to apply what you've learned on your own vehicle before you put it on the showfield.

The only problem is that in order for you to take advantage of all of this, you have to JOIN. You can still come to all of our events, but if you want to judge, or if you want your car on our showfields, you have to be a member.

If you don't feel comfortable with talking to the car owners, or with judges, come to an event, look to see if you have a vehicle similar to yours that has a Senior Grand National tab on the front of the vehicle and take a lot of pictures of the car for reference. The Senior Grand National Award is awarded to a vehicle that has scored at least 390 points out of a possible 400 (what some consider the perfect vehicle).

I know $35 may seem like a waste, but with that $35, you will get a world class magazine, access to a great automotive library and research center, free admission to an outstanding auto museum, and some of the lowest vehicle entry fees of all the other automotive clubs. The advantage of being affiliated with AACA is that it allows you to diversify your interests in other types of vehicles that are 25 years or older. Today you have an interest in '57 Plymouths. If later on you decided that you wanted to get a Corvette (just an example), you can bring your Corvette to the same events that you do with your Plymouth and still participate. You can't bring a Model 'A' to a Plymouth Owner's Club event.

In my case I paid the $35, I liked what I saw, and a year later bit the bullet and paid the $600 for a life membership. Yes $600 is a lot of money, but if AACA never raises their dues (which they just did), after 16 years of membership, you will be ahead of the game. My advice to you is try it for a year. You don't have to stay, but if you like what you see, you can get a life membership and be done with it.

As for the local regions, my dad and I started attending some of the different events put on by the local regions for a couple of years and the one that we felt most comfortable at was the region that we joined. One of the other regions was a close second, and the third was a distant third.

As for snobs and grumpy old S.O.B's?? Yup we have 'em, and unfortunately from time to time a few of them have even managed to hold a national office. Just avoid the individuals who are like that and don't let them get you down. If they're holding a national office or attempting to get a position on the national level, just remember to vote for someone else.

Think about what I've said, give it some thought, and give us a try.

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57 Plymouth, just to expand on some of that, the primary way a guy with a 1957 Plymouth (or 1957 Pontiac, like me) can learn about details on their car is to study as many as possible, take pictures, and determine what is correct (look at Dodges and DeSotos too). You well know that you cannot go to the bookstore and buy a restoration manual for it like you can for your Camaro. If you are at a national show, be it AACA, WPC or Plymouth club, you will learn more than at a local show where you will (presumably) rarely see another 1957 Plymouth. Even if your car is not judged (mine have never been) you will get a more authentic selection to inspect for your own information.

I would also think the Plymouth club should have a technical advisor program to help with your questions on this, and of course these are helpful reasons to be in the clubs.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Oxnard Montalvo</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> Some of these posts touched on what I see as a big turn off for young people, the fact that there are too many old, aloof owners and officials who take themselves and this hobby way too seriously. They suck the fun out.

The sad part is that the ones at fault will never realize it. </div></div>

Preachin' bone gospel there brother!!!

I have not decided if I will join or not. I will try to find a local chapter (why aren't there email addresses listed for EVERY chapter in the directory!!!) and attend a few of their functions. I don't like the "business meeting" thing, so I will attend any shows or cruises they have.

One big problem with joining for me is location: by that I mean that the library and museum and Hershey are all great perks, but I don't live anywhere near them. It isn't logistically feasible for me to use those benefits often.

After I see what the local chapter is like I will make up my mind. I have been in the "typical" style of car club that has monthly meetings. If I were to name names, the Midlands Mopars was the club. They met every month, and moaned and cried about low membership. They kept moving the meetings further and further away from downtown just to suit three members. (while they didn't want to drive over 15 minutes for a meeting, I was driving over an hour each way) They NEVER NEVER NEVER went on a cruise, or a poker run, or to a show together, or anything. They kept trying to have a big Mopar only car show, but never went to any other shows to spread flyers or advertise. To top it all off, the treated my wife like dirt because she is a Camaro owner. Now don't get me wrong, I can take a joke, and I give as good as I get, but they were out and out mean. They were downright rude to her, yet she drove her car all over and they never took theirs anyplace.

I'm sure the local AACA club isn't like that. Since Columbia is a tiny car community, I am sure that I know many of the local AACA members already. (at least the ones that drive thier cars) But the whole "let's have a business meeting and read the minutes and blah blah blah" format is dull. Let's RIDE!! There are tires on the car for a reason, let's GO.

Again, I'm going to try to find the local chapter and attend some of their events. In the mean time, if anyone can put me in contact with people with unrestored or correct 57 Plymouth owners I would appreciate it. This will likely be the only car I restore, everything else I build has been and likely will be hot rods. That's why I want this one right. Plus, it's been in my family for 50 years, we should be just getting used to it. (It is the last new car anyone in my family bought, chew on that one!)

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: poci1957</div><div class="ubbcode-body">

I would also think the Plymouth club should have a technical advisor program to help with your questions on this, and of course these are helpful reasons to be in the clubs. </div></div>

You would think that you would be able to contact the advisor wouldn't you. He doesn't give out his phone or e-mail address, and he is sloooooooooooooooooow to respond to the old fasioned mule mail system

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> I will try to find a local chapter (why aren't there email addresses listed for EVERY chapter in the directory!!!) </div></div>

I would be nice but not everyone is computer savy and I know of some chapter/regions where there is only one or two that have any kind of computer skills. Item two in reguards to this, I'm working on the 2008 AACA Sentimental tour, and you'd be surprised at how many email addresses tend to be wrong. If you check for the local chapter/region, take the address and check switchboard.com and most of the time, you can get the person's phone number (unless unlisted).

Different region/chapter meetings will be different. I've been to the ones like you discribe where it all business meeting and go home. Been to ones where there is a short business meeting (minutes read at some, other published in thier newsletter) and there is some sort of program ranging from fire entinugshers, liensce plate & gas station memboriblia collocting, to women's vintage clothing. I belong to one region that has thier own clubhouse and unfortunely seem to think they have to meet there all the time. The problem I've found is getting someone to lead a tour. This club is one if you lead the tour, they'll follow. I'm hoping the Sentimental Tour will help to get them more active with the cars. I use to belong to (about 20+ years ago) one region that had monthly meeting, business and program and usally toured one day of most months. This was in upstae NY and we'd even take the old cars out in Jan. or Feb. for the winter picnic or what everelse the club decided to do. The two regions there I was active with (Parents belonged to both) are still just as active.

Also, with AACA, (and probably most other clubs) you get back from them somewhat what you put into them. What I mean is if you only go to their show and/or tour, you'll tend to only meet a few of the members and possibly feel like an outsider. If you get active in attending events as well as the business meetings, you'll tend to get to know moree of the members and they'll get to know you. Remember at a meet or event, the members are busy taking care of business and won't be as relaxed and have "available" time like they would at a regluar meeting. Also, if you happend to find a chpater/region that doesn't seem to tour, maybe, you could suggest/ lead a tour. Sometimes a region will become "stale" with ideas on places to go. This is one of the things the Sentimental Tour committee from my region has found, that there are a lot more things around here to see that we overlooked simply because... they were right here. We probably could tour every day for a month and not see all the places on our orginal list of places within a 50 mile radius. I'm the Tour chairman for the region and I'm planning on using this list to get our club more active in touring next year.

just to show how easy a tour can be planned, the other year I setup one to Danville, VA. Got on the internet and did a search for places in Danville. Found two places I thought would be interesting to vist. The Danville sience center and the Southerlin mansion (which was the last capital of the Conferderecy). Called the contact phone number check with them on what would be good dates, determined which day we would go, called back and confirmed the date with them. Asked them to give a short verbal presentation about the history of both buildings we were visting. Used a map program (could use mapquest.com) and laid out a route, staying off major hiways as much as possible. Told the region date, time and place to meet. (if setting up not as the tour chiarman you'd want to get the date ok'd ahead of time) I had 4 phone calls and 1 two hour drive as I had driven the route in a modern car to check it, and about 2 hours of planning.

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just did a quick check of the AACA library online. This is the list for 1957 Plymouth:

Title: Introducing the fiery new Fury by Plymouth

Marque or Author Plymouth 1957

Title: The Forward Look Chrysler Corporation presents the 1957 Plymouth, Dodge, DeSoto, Chrysler, Imperial

Marque or Author Chrysler 1957

Title: (Chrysler Insignia)

Marque or Author Chrysler 1951-59

Title: Chrysler Plymouth 1957

Marque or Author Chrysler 1957

Title: FORD LOWDOWN ON THE SHOWDOWN: A compilation of facts about the differences between the 1957 Ford and the 1957 Plymouth

Marque or Author Ford 1957

Title: Fury by Plymouth FOR THE MAN WHO REALLY LOVERS CARS!

Marque or Author Plymouth 1957

Title: PLYMOUTH !

Marque or Author Plymouth 1957

Title: THE FORWARD LOOK WITH ALUMINUM

Marque or Author Plymouth 1957

Title: Your visit to the Plymouth plant

Marque or Author Plymouth 1957

Title: ALL ABOUT YOUR NEW PLYMOUTH

Marque or Author Plymouth 1957

Title: CHEVROLET? PLYMOUTH? FORD?

Marque or Author Plymouth 1957

Title: NOW-PLYMOUTH'S ENGINEERING LEADERSHIP BRINGS YOU The Exclusive new Torsion-Aire Ride...it carpets the road!

Marque or Author Plymouth 1957

Title: SUBURBANS PLYMOUTH!

Marque or Author Plymouth 1957

I'm sure Kim can help you with more info. She and have copies made for you too. Info on all that is at the AACA Library's website

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as a young kid growing up in Virginia i spent a lot of time at my Grandmothers house.the neighbor was an old man whose name was Mr Moore.he had this old garage behind his house where he spent most of his time.rarely said a word.the garage was packed with stuff going back to the civil war and all kinds of tools in the back he used in working on his projects .i used to stand out side and look in the door at all the amazing stuff.one day he said to me you can come in and look but if you touch anything you cant come in here again.i would stand there looking at all the antiques .i wouldask him what something was and he would stop and explain what it was ,how it worked then go back to his work.because of that when young kids stop and look at my old cars i explain what something is ,how it works .hopefully by treating the kids like i was treated by Mr Moore i can get a kid interested in working on old cars

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