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DRAFT BRAKE BLEEDING DRAFT


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This is registered as "all registered members".<P>password is "letmein"<P>All registered members can use this to modify the following.<P><B>DO NOT USE YET STILL A DRAFT!</B> Take up Barney's tjenkins,Copper81 and padgett's challenge at <A HREF="http://www.aaca.org/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic&f=3&t=004557" TARGET=_blank>http://www.aaca.org/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic&f=3&t=004557</A> and expand on wally888's great work and the <A HREF="http://www.reatta.net" TARGET=_blank>www.reatta.net</A> information. <BR> <BR><B>DO NOT USE YET STILL A DRAFT!</B><BR>D R A F T W O R K I N P R O G R E S S <P><BR>- - - This is the fifth draft - - - <P>INTERESTED PARTIES please feel free to modify, clarify and improve. Much of wally888's work and <A HREF="http://www.reatta.net" TARGET=_blank>www.reatta.net</A> information is contained herein.<P><BR>B R A K E F L U S H P R O C E D U R E<P>D I S C L A I M E R <P>The information presented on this web page and all associated "hot links" represents the opinion(s) of individual contributor(s) and editor(s). While every effort has been made to ensure accuracy, completeness and quality of the information presented, no representation is made regarding the accuracy, thoroughness or reliability of any information contained on any of these pages. Neither the owners of these web pages, the sponsors and advertisers of these pages, or any of the individual contributor(s) or editor(s) accept any liability for any direct, incidental, special, indirect, consequential damages or punitive damages whatsoever the consequences of using or misusing the information presented on these page(s). The use information on this Web site or others "hot linked" are at your own risk, there are no expressed or implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose! <P>C A U T I O N 1: Brake fluid may irritate eyes and skin, Wear eye protection. In case of contact, take the following actions: Eye contact - rinse thoroughly with water and see an eye professional. Skin contact - wash with soap and water. If ingested - consult a physician immediately.<P>C A U T I O N 2: Avoid spilling brake fluid on any painted surface, wiring, cables or electrical connections. Brake fluid will damage paint and electrical connections. If any fluid is spilled on the vehicle, immediately flush the area with water to minimize potential damage.<P>C A U T I O N 3: When servicing brake parts, do not create dust. Many brake parts contain asbestos fibers which can become airborne if dust is created during servicing. Breathing dust containing asbestos fibers may cause serious bodily harm. A water dampened cloth or water based solution should be used to remove dust from brake and surrounding parts. The wet methods will prevent or greatly reduce asbestos fibers from becoming airborne. <P>CAUTION 4: Always assume the system is pressurized (up to 2,200 psi) unless you know the pressure is properly relieved with the key off. Any time the key is turned on, pressure will be present! Any time the key is off the system is pressurized (up to 2,200 psi) unless you know the pressure is properly relieved with the key off.<P>CAUTION 5: Brake petal flushing method NOT RECOMMENDED!!! Power flushing is the recommended method. Brake Petal Flushing - Everyone knows about this method, but few know how bad it can be. Normally the piston, which is connected to the brake pedal, only travels so far in the master cylinder. When using the brake pedal flushing method, the piston can travel much further down in the master cylinder and contact an area that has never been touched by the piston or its sealing O-ring. If the area has deposits or corrosion in it you <B>can ruin or seriously weaken the O-ring in just one pass</B> and then you will need a new master cylinder. This is most likely going to occur in a vehicle where brake flushing has not been done as often as it should have been. If your brake fluid has been neglected then you should only have it power flushed. In my opinion for this reason and due to the Reatta's age <B>all Reatta brake systems should only be power flushed.</B> If you are going to brake petal flush; Determine how far down the brake pedal normally goes. Put a block or blocks of wood under it to <B>prevent it from going any further down than it would in normal daily use.</B> This should prevent O-ring damage by deposits or corrosion. <P><I>Do not even think about starting this job unless you are mechanically competent and have read and fully understand everything here and in the appropriate shop manuals.</I> <P>Much of the information of this draft procedure comes compliments of wally888 and <A HREF="http://www.reatta.net/" TARGET=_blank>http://www.reatta.net/</A> Barny Eaton and this Forum.<P>Materials you will require before you start:<P>__Safety glasses<BR>__Paper towels.<BR>__Minimum of two quarts of fresh DOT 3 brake fluid.<BR><B>__NEVER USE SILICONE BRAKE FLUIDS</B><BR>__approximately 18 inches clear tubing<BR>__Jack and Jack stands with wheel blocks.<BR>__Wrenches.<BR>__Piece(s) of wood.<BR>__Container to receive old brake fluid; dispose of in an environmentally safe method..<BR>__ <a href="http://www.motiveproducts.com/"> Pressure bleeder (optional).</a><BR>__Attractive (optional) helper.<P><BR>What I would recommend is... <P>1: Depressurize the hydraulic accumulator; The hydraulic accumulator contains dirty, contaminated brake fluid. With the ignition off, depressurize the hydraulic accumulator by applying the brake pedal from inside the car by applying the brake pedal approximately twenty-five (25) times using a pedal force of approximately fifty (50) pounds. A noticeable change in pedal feel will occur when the accumulator is depressurized. To be certain that as much fluid has been expelled as possible continue applying the brake pedal several more times after this change in pedal pressure. <P>2: Thoroughly clean the exterior of the reservoir cap, reservoir and surrounding area. See Cautions 1 and 2. Remove the cap from the reservoir, wipe clean the inside and set aside. Using a piece of masking tape and indelible marker, mark a syringe or turkey baster "NOT FIT FOR FOOD PREPARATION!". Using this implement to remove approximately half of the old brake fluid from the reservoir. <P>3. Using a small paint brush, or lint free cloth remove the deposits from the bottom and sides of the reservoir.<P>4. Using the syringe or turkey baster labeled "NOT FIT FOR FOOD PREPARATION!" remove the rest of the old brake fluid from the reservoir. Wipe clean the inside of the reservoir. <P>5. Fill the reservoir to the full line put the reservoir cap back on. <P>1. to 5. ALTERNATIVE ALTERNATE submission that I will study and incorporate later after I try it out. Going to 16F tonight too cold, plastic parts too brittle to play with for a while...looks interesting and thorough. So this is a DRAFT OF A DRAFT??I use a slightly different method of flushing the boost section....I remove the gravity feed fitting that goes into the back side of thepump. This is slightly tricky if you are clumsy, you could break the<BR>90 degree plastic fitting. You remove the little wire clip that<BR>retains the plastic (90 degree) fitting and pull the fitting out of the<BR>pump housing. I have a clear plastic (3/8" ID, I think) ready to plug<BR>in the plastic fitting so the fluid can drain to a oil change pan under<BR>the car. This is faster. Then I refill for the second or third flush, I just plug the fitting back into the pump housing..... it doesn't leak since there is no pressure on that line. When you finish flushing the boost side of the system, reinstall the 90 degree fitting and lock it in place by replacing the wire clip. Now I would fill the reservoir with clean fluid before proceeding with<BR>flushing the brakes. The best way (which I have never done) would be to completely remove the<BR>reservoir and back flush it through the output hole. As you know,<BR>there is a filter in the bottom, this would push crap out of the<BR>filter. Finally.... the very best is to replace the reservoir, but at over $100 retail, most owners will not do that<P><BR>6. With the window and hood open so you can hear the pump run and stop turn the ignition to the run position. It is not necessary to start the engine. After several seconds the brake lights will go out. Wait several more seconds and the pump will stop running. The system and the accumulator should be fully pressurized. Turn ignition to the off position. You will have clean or at least cleaner fluid in the accumulator and reservoir.<P>7. Repeat step one ... reprinted here so you can print and use this page as a checklist. Depressurize the hydraulic accumulator; The hydraulic accumulator contains dirty, contaminated brake fluid. With the ignition off, depressurize the hydraulic accumulator by applying the brake pedal from inside the car by applying the brake pedal approximately twenty-five (25) times using a pedal force of approximately fifty (50) pounds. A noticeable change in pedal feel will occur when the accumulator is depressurized. To be certain that as much fluid has been expelled as possible continue applying the brake pedal several more times after this change in pedal pressure. This is a second flush of the accumulator.<P>8. See Cautions 1 and 2 and then remove the cap from the reservoir and set aside. The brake fluid may be some what discolored and dirty. As this is a DIY project and brake fluid is relatively cheap remove all the remaining brake fluid using the syringe or turkey baster labeled "NOT FIT FOR FOOD PREPARATION!". Wipe and clean the inside of the reservoir. <P>9. Fill the reservoir to the full line, put the reservoir cap back on. With the window and hood open so you can hear the pump run and stop turn the ignition to the run position. It is not necessary to start the engine. After several seconds the brake lights will go out. Wait several more seconds and the pump will stop running. The system and the accumulator should be fully pressurized. Turn ignition to the off position. You will again have clean or at least cleaner fluid in the accumulator and reservoir. <P>10. Start to bleed the right rear (passenger side) brake cylinder farthest from the master cylinder. <P>11. This is going to take two people from this point on so go get your "working partner".<P>12. Using all the appropriate cautions about jacking, blocking and using safety stands raise the car and remove the right rear wheel. Noting Caution 3 carefully with a wet cloth clean the dirt and brake dust from the right rear brake bleeder. (Good time to check for brake pad wear.)<P>13. Note!!! Do not allow the brake fluid level fall below the reservoir seam line!!! CHECK BRAKE FLUID LEVEL FREQUENTLY in the reservoir during the bleeding procedure. A third set of eyes might be useful here. Allowing air into the system will necessitate starting the bleeding procedure again from the start.<P>14. Attach a clear bleeder hose to the bleeder valve and put the other end in a 2 liter empty Diet Coke plastic bottle.<P>15. Have your "working partner" with the window and hood open so he/she can hear you and can hear the pump run and stop turn the ignition to the run position. It is not necessary to start the engine. After several seconds the brake lights will go out. Wait several more seconds and the pump will stop running. The system and the accumulator should be fully pressurized. Leave the ignition in the on position. <P>16. <B>SEE CAUTION 5: </B>Have your "working partner" slightly depress the brake pedal and hold. <B>NOTE:</B> DO NOT ALLOW THE OPERATOR OF THE BRAKE PEDAL TO DEPRESS THE PEDAL ALL THE WAY TO THE FLOOR. The easiest way to accomplish this is to place blocks of wood under the brake pedal. The reason for this is, under normal operation of the braking system(which is what we are trying to maintain here) the stroke of the master cylinder never goes that far. Which means that you will be pushing a seal and piston into a region they've never been before, and after 10+ years of use they will not tolerate it. This is asking for trouble with any normal braking system. This blocks of wood method will allow you to use just about anyone to push the pedal without having to explain how far and why to them. Saves a lot of time and the master cylinder and seals. <P>17. Open the caliper bleeding screw 1/2 to 3/4 turn and allow the fluid to flow into the empty container. It should be darker at first and eventually will flow clean and bubble free. CHECK BRAKE FLUID LEVEL FREQUENTLY in the reservoir and top up during the bleeding procedure. To check reservoir level. First retighten bleeding screw, let the brake pedal return to the resting position and top up the brake fluid level. Again have your "working partner" slightly depress the brake pedal and hold making certain the blocks of wood are still in place.<P>18. Open the caliper bleeding screw 1/2 to 3/4 turn and allow the fluid to flow into the empty 2 liter empty Diet Coke plastic bottle. It eventually will flow clean and bubble free. Remember to CHECK BRAKE FLUID LEVEL FREQUENTLY in the reservoir and top up during the bleeding procedure. Retighten bleeding screw, let the brake pedal return to the resting position and top up the brake fluid level. Remove bleeder hose and reinstall the wheel and dust cover.<P>19. For the left (driver's side) of the car repeat steps 12. to 18. <P>Note: Pressure bleeding is the recommended method but if you must petal flush, see CAUTION 5 again and do steps 20 to 25.<P>20. Bleeding the front circuit. Start with the right (passenger's) side.<P>21. Using all the appropriate cautions about jacking, blocking and using safety stands raise the car and remove the right front wheel. Noting Caution 3 carefully with a wet cloth clean the dirt and brake dust from the right rear brake bleeder. (Good time to check for brake pad wear.)<P>22. Note!!! Do not allow the brake fluid level fall below the reservoir seam line!!! CHECK BRAKE FLUID LEVEL FREQUENTLY in the reservoir during the bleeding procedure. A third set of eyes might be useful here. Allowing air into the system will necessitate starting the bleeding procedure again from the start.<P>23. Attach a clear bleeder hose to the bleeder valve and put the other end in a 2 liter empty Diet Coke plastic bottle.<P>24. Open the caliper bleeding screw 1/2 to 3/4 turn. Have your "working partner" slowly depress the brake pedal to the blocks of wood and have them announce that it is on the blocks of wood. The fluid will flow into the empty container. When your "working partner" announces that the petal is on the blocks of wood close the bleeder tightly. Allow the pedal to return to resting position. Remember to CHECK BRAKE FLUID LEVEL FREQUENTLY in the reservoir and top up during the bleeding procedure. Repeat opening the caliper bleeding screw 1/2 to 3/4 turn, having your "working partner" slowly depress the brake pedal to the 2x4 and continue to have them announce that it is on the blocks of wood. Closing the bleeder tightly each time eventually the brake fluid will flow clean and bubble free into the container. Remove bleeder hose and reinstall the wheel and dust cover.<P>25. Repeat steps 21 to 24 for the left (driver's) side.<P>26. You are almost done. With the ignition off, depressurize the hydraulic accumulator by applying the brake pedal from inside the car by applying the brake pedal approximately twenty-five (25) times using a pedal force of approximately fifty (50) pounds. A noticeable change in pedal feel will occur when the accumulator is depressurized. To be certain that as much fluid has been expelled as possible continue applying the brake pedal several more times after this change in pedal pressure. Fill the brake fluid reservoir to the maximum full level. Always discarding the partially full containers of brake fluid, it is hydroscopic and will absorb water from the atmosphere causing lowering of the boiling point. I have even heard of it absorbing water through the plastic container and flexible brake lines, don't know for certain.<P>27. Caution; do not move the vehicle until a firm pedal is achieved with all brake warning lights out. Test the brakes carefully at a low speed. ABS can be tested on wet or dirt surface, never a dry pavement unless an empty race track and you do not care about tires. <P><BR>28. Repeat in one to two years. <P>NOTE!!!: The use information on this Web site or others "hot linked" are at your own risk!!!<P>Lets see if we all can polish this up, Robert<P><BR><B>DO NOT USE YET STILL A DRAFT!</B>

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