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Selling 48 V12 Continental Coupe for $1,500


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Hi All,

I have decided to sell my 48 Lincoln Continental Coupe. The car has rusty rockers and has not run in 30 years. It does have the V12 with overdrive and is fairly complete (missing trim pieces and wheel covers). I will put a picture on this weekend. If you are interested call me at 520-349-0499. Car is in Tucson and I would like $1,500.

I am also selling a 41 continental cabriolet #157 (also V12, Columbia rear, rusty rockers and has not run in 20 years) which will be on ebay soon.

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Just got back from taking the Grandkids to disneyland.

I only paid 1200.00 for this Packard. the guy who owned it died and had a 3000 sqft garage full of old cars, I was told about how cheap they were going for and thought it was to good to be true then got a call from a friend and headed over there and picked up this 36 for 1200, I offered him 1500 but then he said he wanted the hood ornament and fender turn signals and he would delived it that same day for 1200, needless to say it now sits in my front yard.Even my wife said good deal. will post some more pics if you guys want to see more??

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Cecil, There is a guy in town who is selling an old 34 Lincoln (he has the original title but says is should be for parts only, because somebody must have cut the original body off and put this big wood and aluminum carriage sort of body on it, separate drivers compartment) there is a triangle logo that says Willoughby Body and Carriage Works, Utica NY USA, It has lots of leather, mohair, german silver and nickel hardware. He says that if you stripped it and scrapped the metal fittings, then parted out the rest, it should be worth $1500 or so. He says the engine is an oddball V12 but is of no use to Zephyr guys like me, but it still runs OK and just needs to be washed and waxed. I think I'll go over and offer him $1200, if he delivers it and can show me that it runs.

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The original poster is offering a 48 LC Coupe complete with drivetrain for $1500. Isn't THAT a good deal? I have been looking into a 46 LC Coupe without drivetrain and from rusty New England for $1200 offer and I thought that was a good deal.

Is it just the fact that these cars cost so much to restore, that people avoid them? I have noticed the LC Coupes 41 to 48 aren't as well thought of a LC Cabs.

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Continentals survived. Edsels defining moment has obviously

been a status thing since new. The folks used to scrap zephyrs for the holy continentals............

I am amazed how many have surfaced on this electronic medium....and because of that 12-1500 for a restorable coupe

is a deal but..look around..for a little more $$$ and get a nice car..unless........you are a hacker wanting to make a street rod...............

I joined the lincoln Zephyr club...very specifically ...not the stuffy old continental club......

kinda underdog.....not a respected """classic"""

it is ironic that those non v12 zephyrs (hot rods)

have been responsible

for boosting our values and recognition(scrape)...

Go look at that connie, if is it close to what u want...save it...put a 12 in it..u will love it...and it is a stealLL

jb

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Here's another perspective. It seems to me that, freqently, more expensive, "luxury" cars don't hold their values as well as cheaper, "sportier" cars. Part of the reason is that "luxury" doesn't age well. Tastes change and technology moves on. But "sporty" seems to reach across generations. You see it all the time:

Town cars and formal sedans from the Classic era go for a fraction of what contemporary (and cheaper) coupes and convertibles do. 55-57 Chevys outpace Buicks of the same era, even though the Chevys are more numerous and no where near the quality of the Buicks. Heck, until recently, the Bel Airs even rivaled or surpassed the price point for the 56-7 Mark IIs! Late 60s Mustangs outprice Cougars, and the list goes on and on.

I think this applies to the later Continental coupes as well. They are fascinating, rare cars, the epitome of luxury in their day. But because they lack the sportiness of a convertible or even 3-window coupe, prices are suppressed. But one thing they do have is *presence* wink.gif

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I think part of the reason the old luxury cars dont sell for as much as the sportier type old cars is the cost to restore them and the price for chrome now. Here is a pic of my 48 conv. coupe. I spent 6 years restoring it and there is over 10 grand just in chrome work. There will come a day when we will be able to get out what we put into our cars and if you watch the trends at the auctions (there is more than barret jackson) the classics are starting to make a comeback and bring what they are worth. I restore my cars because I love what I buy and I drive them, they can always be re-restored.

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Agree and agree on all points but you would think those in the Lincoln and Continental hobby would jump at a chance to get a Connie for $1200/$1500. As a Buick collector (1949 Roadmaster / 1968 Riviera) I understand the points regarding the nonsense of collecting 55-57 Chevys and other popular models. These are fun cars to own but come on.

I am just an odd duck. I like a wide range of cars. I like Camaros and Mustangs too but it's like listening to a song over and over again, eventually it's just background noise.

I'm not a Connie snob. I like Zephyrs, especially the early ones as I am a fan of the Aero styling craze of the 30's (Chrysler Airflow / Zephyr / Nash Ambassador).

I think my favorite "period" though is turning out to be the post WWII "club coupe" period. I have the 49 Roadmaster which is a Sedanette (read: fastback) 2 door post model. I would love to get 4-5 46 to 49 models from various makes.

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I love driving my 37 LZ sedan, as well as my 34 Auburn 652Y sedan. Neither carry the prestige of a true classic (or the market potential), but mine get a lot more lots than the 55-57 Chevys. And I drive my to Wal-Mart, the post office, church and a lot of other places. I am restoring a 36 Cord 810 right now (I sold a 57 Ranchero to buy it). Again it is a sedan, so it does not carry the value of the ragtops, but it still gets more looks than the current "cool" high dollar post war cars. The bottom line is that I have my cars not because I want to make money selling them, but because I want to preserve a part of history. I drive them because people love to see something they have never seen anywhere but books. Essentially, the cars bring great joy to many people each time I take them out. Even gave a 83 year old man the thrill of his life by giving in a ride in the beat up, unrestored Cord.

I was at a car show last week with my LZ sedan. It was the hit of the local show even though a 67 Mustang took home the trophy. I couldn't leave because of the crowd around the old V-12.

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Around Christmas, when I get the Cord back on the road, it will no doubt bring attention. And in truth, I have had my Auburn six cylinder sedan for three years and I have been offered almost twice as much as I have in it. So I think it might well turn out to be a good investment. I have offers on the LZ all the time too. Just hearing the 12 run gets folks excited. On the Cord, sedan or not I think it is a great investment, but it still the open cars that bring out what we call the "snob" crowd.

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...

Yes, Merv was quick on the gun and picked up my 48. As far as the 41, I admit to being very reluctant to wanting to sell the car. Given the rarety of the 41s and the fact that I could get mine running if I had the time.....I keep flip-flopping on whether or not I will sell......make me an offer I cannot refuse :-)

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I know that feeling well, Scott. Do you have a photo of your '41 that you can share?

I'm trying(?) to sell a 1967 Mustang Convertible that I've owned since 1981. My wife drove it from California to Texas in 1993 and it hasn't seen much use since then. I'm not sure that I REALLY want to sell it, but I need the space for my Lincoln Zephyr and Continental projects. The money wouldn't hurt either but I have a LOT of emotional investment in that car!

I'm a lousy horse trader, I always fall in love with the horse!

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Whoa...lets get back to the Willoughby bodied project. I grew up in Utica, NY and even know where the Willoughby factory was. I missed a couple Willoughby's over the years, including the Willoughby bodied Model A the corporate secretary had, anyway ----- can you PLEASE advise just what this is, where and for how much it can be bought? thank you. And as for the fittings, they are not silver or nickel, just "german silver" PLATED, as most of the high end cars were of the period.

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Well, I looked up the RM Auction listing and here's what lot #281 is listed as:

----------------------------------------------------------

LOT: 281

1933 Lincoln KA Dual Cowl Phaeton

Estimate:$125,000-$175,000 US

Chassis No. KA738

AUCTION RESULTS: Lot was Sold at a price of $154,000

Specifications:

125hp, 382 cu. in. V12 L-Head, Stromberg EE22 downdraft two-barrel carburetor, three speed sliding gear transmission, four wheel longitudinal leaf springs, Bendix Duo-Servo mechanical four-wheel breaks. Wheelbase: 136"

Even though Lincoln was founded by the same man responsible for Cadillac, Henry Leland, a post WWI recession and an erroneous multi-million dollar tax bill spelled the end of Lincoln within two years of the introduction of their first automobile. In 1922, Lincoln was bought out of receivership by none other than Henry Ford. His son, Edsel Ford quickly took charge and commissioned the best American coachbuilders to create designs for Lincoln.

Edsel Ford, much like Henry Leland, set high standards and left both his Lincoln engineers and the coachbuilders to realize them, applying their skill, knowledge and experience freely. The rewards of this approach became clear in 1932 with the introduction of the Model KB, a narrow angle 448 cubic inch V12-powered 145 inch wheelbase expression of the ultimate in sophistication, power and refinement. Not only was the KB luxurious, it was also a good handling road car.

In 1933, a smaller V12 of 382 cubic inches was introduced as the KA, to serve as more affordable alternative to the KB. The KA V12 used offset cylinder banks, dropping the fork-and-blade connecting rods employed by Leland and every Lincoln engine to that point. Aluminum pistons were installed and the crankshaft was carried in four main bearings. The detachable cylinder heads were constructed of cast iron. This engine, while based upon the KB V12, was simpler and less expensive to produce, and yet, is considered to be the finest V12 engine ever made by Lincoln. It is no wonder that even though it is nearly three quarters of a century old, the Lincoln KA Dual Cowl Phaeton presented here still maintains its original V12.

The earliest known owner of this Lincoln, which features coachwork by Dietrich, was Josephine Caeverth of Lockport, New York, who in turn sold it to the Robert C. Wood Auto Agency on March 11, 1943. Lawrence Fitzpatrick was the next to acquire the car and he did so from the Wood Agency on November 4, 1943; it is speculated that this sale was prompted by the fuel rationing during the war years. Marion Roberts from Grand Island, New York, was the next owner and he sold it to James Howe from Buffalo, New York in 1960. Mr. Howe worked on the automobile for over five years and sold it to its present owner on May 2, 1966.

In 1969, the Lincoln was taken to the “Restoration Shop” in Jamesburg, New Jersey to finish the restoration. A 1934 Lincoln donor car was used procure some needed parts, Leife Drexler of Sicklerville, New Jersey crafted the Scottish leather, and a complete stainless steel exhaust system was fabricated to replicate the original design. In total the restoration took seven and a half years to complete.

The efforts were rewarded on June 14, 1975 when the Lincoln received a First Junior AACA award in Frederick, Maryland and again two years later on June 25, 1977, when an AACA First Senior was awarded in Scranton, Pennsylvania. In 1983, the Lincoln was put on display in the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Museum in Auburn, Indiana, where it resided until this year.

While there is some debate as to whether this is one of nine or one of twelve examples ever produced, at any rate, this Lincoln KA Dual Cowl Phaeton is an uncommon find and its sale marks a rare opportunity to acquire one of the most desirable body styles of the KA line. , at any rate, this Lincoln KA Dual Cowl Phaeton is an uncommon find and its sale marks a rare opportunity to acquire one of the most desirable body styles of the KA line.

--------------------------------------------------------

It seems that this is a 1933 KA Lincoln with a Dietrich body which sold for $154,000.

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HEY IS THAT THE PAUL DRAPER CAR WITH THE RARE (MISSING) VACUUM ANTENNA, RUSTY CAR FROM MIDWEST??

PAUL DRAPER WAS A TAP DANCER....WHAT'S THE CONNECTION??

I HERE TELL THAT HE PERFORMED WITH T DORSEY, WHO ALSO

PLAYED AT PRIVATE EBF GATHERING IN GROSSE POINTE?? MAYBE..

THAT CAR HAS BEEN IN THE SAME CONDITION FOR 25 YEARS...WHATS UP WITH THAT??

OR NOT. WHATS THE ODDS THE SAME CAR BACK AND FORTH ACROSS THE COUNTRY, BUT NEVER FIXED.....

JEFF

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Yes, this is the Dancer's car! You are correct, when I purchased the car, it had been in storage for a considerable amount of time, and now unfortunately is still in storage as I do not have the time it deserves to get the car running. What does "EBF" stand for? Also, what antenna was used in other cars - I assumed they were vacuum?

Thanks,

Scott

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EBF IS EDSEL BRYANT FORD

I TRIED TO FIND INFO ABOUT THIS DRAPER, BUT NOT MUCH ON THE WEB. THE CAR HAS A VERY RARE VACUUM ANTENNA OPTION...MOST DO NOT.

IF U ARE SELLING / RESEARCHING THE CAR, CHK WITH DAVE COLE, HE IS A WEST COASTER AND GURU OF ALL THINGS CONTINENTAL. (TWOTZ EDITOR) IN THIS AGE OF CELEBRITY, THE HISTORY OF A CAR SEEMS TO AFFECT $$$ IN THE INFLATED OLD CAR MARKET.

JB

oHIo

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Hi, how rare is rare on the vacuum antenna? My '48 Continental has one. I removed it because it didn't work, I believe it has a leak. I saved it cause I never throw anything out and was going to grt it fixed someday. I see advertised in Hemmings someone that rebuilds them does anyone have any info on him? Thanks George

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I THINK ALMOST ALL POSTWARS HAD THEM. I HAVE NEVER SEEN ANOTHER IN MY LIMITED EXPOSURE TO CONTINETALS. THE POSTWAR HAS FENDER MOUNTED UNIT, WHERE AS THE 40 /41 IS COWL MOUNTED AND THIS LIMITED SPACE, IT IS A MUCH NARROWER UNIT.

I SUPPOSE IT IS LIKE THE FABLED CUSTOM'S WITH REAR RADIO CONTROLS, OR THE FRESH AIR VENT FILTER UNIT FOR 40/ 41 HOT WATER HEAT SYSTEMS...

COOL ACCESSORIES..

WHO HAS SALES STUFF?? MUST BE PROMOTIONAL STUFF OUT THERE SOME WHERE...

JB

oHIo

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Hey Guys have not been around for a while but i guess i am back. Just bought another 1942 lincoln but this time its a four door not worth as much has an postwar grill and bumpers but it cost me $400.00 and the owner is going to deliver it. My wife may divorce me but what can i say??

if you dont remember i have a 1942 3 passenger coupe. So my point is there are deals to be had you just have to be really lucky. ricko ps i will post pics of both shortly.

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Guest imported_V12Bill

The poewer antennae can be repaired by Klaus Wojak. I think he lives in NC, and he charges about $350 a pop. They come back looking new and He guarantees them for one year. I have been able to fix my own , but I need a source for 3 section masts with a base section 5/16" dia. by at least 22' long. Does any one have knowledge of where I could buy the masts?

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