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Anti-Foam Agent in Radiator


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Foaming is caused by air being drawn in by the pump seal/packing. Easy quick fix, drain the system of antifreeze and flush with clean water. Add 4 oz of cutting oil from a machine shop. It’s water soluble and will not foam. It will prevent rust, and if the car overflows it washes off with a hose. Just don’t leave it in if you live in areas that freeze. 

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1 hour ago, Morgan Wright said:

 

What sort of water pump do Reo's have?

It’s a fairly common design for later cars. If I’m not mistaken yours is a different design. Mine mounts on the front of the engine and is belt driven from the crankshaft and has been rebuilt with a ceramic seal so no leaks. This picture is before it was rebuilt. 

 

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1 hour ago, edinmass said:

Foaming is caused by air being drawn in by the pump seal/packing. Easy quick fix, drain the system of antifreeze and flush with clean water. Add 4 oz of cutting oil from a machine shop. It’s water soluble and will not foam. It will prevent rust, and if the car overflows it washes off with a hose. Just don’t leave it in if you live in areas that freeze. 

 

What brand(s) have you used that work?

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Just go to a local machine shop and ask for cutting oil. Or order some from Napa or Amazon. I have always borrowed it from local shops, so I have no idea as to brand. Just be sure it’s water soluble cutting oil. I have a water bottle full in the cabinet here. When I moved south, I asked for the nearest local machine shop. Introduced myself, and pick up the oil at the same time.

 

PS- be sure it’s cutting OIL not fluid.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, edinmass said:

Just go to a local machine shop and ask for cutting oil.

 

Are you taking about the oil concentrate with an emulsifier that is mixed with water to use as a cooling fluid for a milling machine?  Or, the lubricating oil that would be used when drilling a large hole with a drill press?  As a retired machinist when you say "cutting oil" I think of the latter.

 

 

 

Edited by Ronnie (see edit history)
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The stuff I refer to as cutting oil is used on lathes and Bridgeport's too cool and lubricate the cutting tool. It stays suspended in water, and turns the water white........like diluted milk. Works great, won't stain you driveway or floor when leaking, doesn't foam, ad keeps seals working without problems while preventing rust. It's a win-win, as long as you car can't freeze. On a CCCA cross country Caravan back in 1995, a newly restored 1932 V-12 Cadillac was pushing out water by the overflow and kept overheating. I inspected it, and instead of pulling the car apart the day before the tour left, we did the drain and fill with water. Drove to a machine shop, added the oil and drove away. The car did well over 4000 miles without adding any more water. It's best to replace water pump packings with modern seals or a ceramic seal if possible. I'm a purist, but NONE of my cars have packings in them. Packing will always leak sooner or later, and at a hard to predict rate. I like to keep the garage and trailer floor dry, and don't like last minute leaks before or while on tour. A water pump with packing can and often will run trouble free for years, until it doesn't. My 36 Pierce has all over 20K on the ceramic seal I installed back in 1992......hard to believe its been that long. The car does not leak.

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56 minutes ago, edinmass said:

The stuff I refer to as cutting oil is used on lathes and Bridgeport's too cool and lubricate the cutting tool. It stays suspended in water, and turns the water white........like diluted milk.

 

That's what If figured. Just wanted to clarify so someone wouldn't run out and and ask for cutting oil and get one of the other types of oils routinely used in a machine shop. A lot of those cutting oils that I've used look similar burnt transmission fluid, stink like sulfur, and they don't mix with water.

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The only brand that I can remember I believe was called Rustlock.  The railroad where I worked bought it in 5 gal buckets and kept it in the storehouse until it was needed in the machine shop. They bought things like that in bulk and probably bought what ever brand was the cheapest at the time they placed an order.

 

It was a laborer's job to keep the machines clean and full of coolant so I didn't have to deal with it much other than when using the machines.   Although it's mixed with water, it has lubricating properties to prevent wear on the machines and it kept the machines and parts from rusting. I don't remember it foaming but I wasn't concerned about that when I was using it.  A machinist is primarily interested in it keeping the cutting tools cool.

Edited by Ronnie (see edit history)
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  • 2 weeks later...

Denatured alcohol evaporates too quickly and it's annoying to spend 20 dollars a gallon each time. Better to use a higher alcohol. Isopropyl is $26 a gallon but it only has a slightly higher boiling point. Maybe try butyl. Boiling points:

 

1 carbon 

methanol 148

 

2 carbons

ethanol 173

 

3 carbons

isopropyl 178

n-propyl 181

 

4 carbons

isobutanol 226

n-butanol 243

2 butanol 210

 

The cheapest I could find is $24 a pint. https://www.amazon.com/Laboratory-Grade-Sec-Butyl-Alcohol-500mL-Collection/dp/B07JCF2214/ref=sr_1_3?hvadid=7010503586&hvbmt=be&hvdev=c&hvqmt=e&keywords=butyl+alcohol&qid=1568300590&s=gateway&sr=8-3

 

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Edited by Morgan Wright (see edit history)
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  • 1 month later...

I live in Fla. where it get quite warm in the summer.     Remaining stuck at a stop light (forever it seems)   and over hot blacktop and 90+ air temps create problems keeping my ‘38’ Buick under 212*    This summer was better in keeping my engine cool enough.   I don’t remember who mentioned using this mixture.     Distilled water and The Barr’s leak product.   It is a water pump lubricant and anti-corrosion inhibitor.    I got from Walmart from about $2.05 a bottle.    Barr’s Leak p/n is  1311.     Walmart’s sku # 55598901.   My machinist uses a water soluble / lubricant while machining parts on his lathe.   So,  it not a special product - just packaged differently.    

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