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Getting back down to the original paint


West Peterson
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Is there any economical way of getting back down to the original paint. We have a Brush that was "restored" quite a while ago. They painted over the original paint (not sure if it was enamel or lacquer, yet). In an effort to restore its original paint, I was wondering what could be done.

Also, still looking for someone that can weld the axle. wink.gif

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West, Re getting down to the original paint, there was a feature within the last couple years in either the Restorer or the Model A news about a very nice original A pick-up that had been painted with a brush at some point. The current owner has been wet sanding and I think compounding the top layer off and is getting to the original coat of paint. As you can imagine this is a significant amount of work, and if I remember right, he is taking hours to days on each panel, I think it was moving along, but not totally done at the time the article was written. Looked good in the pictures, though. Again based on memory but I think he happens to be a skilled bodyman which probably helps.

That said I assume housepaint of some sort was used on the A, vs. automotive finish on your Brush car. I think a lot of your success will depend on the paint that is on the vehicle, West, and how it was applied, etc. Getting there may be half the fun if you have the time, but you mentioned "economical" - not sure what that means in terms of the time you can put into this. If you really want to pursue let me know, I will dig up the article and the guy's name, you could contact him for more detail on the technique but it is interesting that he has been able to do this.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Barry Wolk</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Contact Joe at National Tool & Die Welding in Livonia, Michigan. They are a government certified welder that welds the base of 30-foot light towers for me. I can vouch for their work. </div></div>

We need to find an expert arbores welder.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: West Peterson</div><div class="ubbcode-body">

Also, still looking for someone that can weld the axle. wink.gif </div></div>

I wooden do that if I were you. I've had good luck with a single edge razon in a Red Devil handle scraping paint down to priver or the original paint. Touch the corners on a stone so the chance of digging in is lessened. The top coats in most cases don't really bond to the original finish and you can sprape off large sections once you develope a feel for it. Practice on some modern junk first.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: R W Burgess</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> I'm going to have to introduce the "smilie factor" of this forum to West, so I won't look so ignorant in the future. frown.gifwhistle.gif

Wayne </div></div>

My wink wasn't good enough for you, Wayne? wink.gifwink.gifwink.gif

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> Originally Posted By: Barry WolkContact Joe at National Tool & Die Welding in Livonia, Michigan. They are a government certified welder that welds the base of 30-foot light towers for me. I can vouch for their work.

We need to find an expert arbores welder. _________________________

Never avoid the chance to skirt the issue! </div></div>

Now, West, you and I both know there's no wink.gif anywhere in the text above. confused.gifsmile.gif

Wayne

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There was another story back in 1990 or '91 where a guy had a Model A Standard Roadster.

The car only had 8,000 odd miles but it was repainted in the early 30s by the Ford Dealer. This guy sanded the entire car down to reveal the original Andalusite Blue paint.

He did say the second color was softer than the original paint and that helped alot.

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So how about some pics of the Brush? I'd try using some 4-0 steel wool and a little denatured alcohol to start with. Rub a little, wipe a little and see if you can slowly cut through each layer of paint like that. Go slowly and gently and it might work. The alcohol will work well with a spirit based paint like what was brushed on the car. Dont allow it to sit long enough to soak in. The original paint may have been varnished over and the alcohol might get into that if you let it sit too long.

Terry

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