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TexRiv_63

1924 Cadillac Value

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I am considering the purchase of a 1924 Cadillac sedan in decent original condition. I have never owned a true antique or classic car and was surprised at the lack of information available on the web regarding the realistic value range compared to that of newer cars. Prices of cars at dealers, Ebay and in classified ads seem ridculously high compared to the few sources I did find, and most seem to not sell very fast. I know that the base sedan models are worth much less than the open cars and coupes but the little information I did find also surprised me in that the older, pre 28 cars appear to be worth less across the board than the 29 to 35 models. I would appreciate any tips on sources for real - world valuation for something like this.

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i strongly recommend you do NOT buy a car for investment. Yes, there is always some guy who knows some guy who knows some guy who "really made a killing on the sale of an old car". Jumping "cold turkey" into the old car hobby if your interest is primarily "investment oriented" is not a good idea. You may well be taken advantage of, and, especially with the older cars, where technical support is more problamatical, find it a unpleasant experience.

But for most of us, at least those of us who are LEGITIMATE old car buffs, we buy and operate a car because we LIKE it.

Before buying ANYTHING, suggest you go to and hang around old car events, where cars similar to the one you are contemplating are appearing. You will find that once you explain WHY you want to talk to the owner (yes, many of us to get a bit tired of being asked " did you buy that new..?" ) you will find we will go out of our way to help you with advice.

More important, you may get a ride in the car you are contemplating, or possibly even get a chance to drive it.

How aware are you of how different the technology is, and how different the cars drive, from the various eras. Cars of the early twenties were specifically desgined for roads so miserable you probably have never seen one.

The kind of speeds and roads that we have even in suburban residential areas may exceed the comfortable cruising speed of many of even the biggest cars of the era you noted.

The more info. you have, and the more familiar you are with the car and era you are contemplating, the more rewarding your purchase will be for you in terms of FUN. In financial terms, most of us resign ourselves to the economic reality that loving old cars is more like a religion, than a business...!

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You misunderstand me and my motives. I am 58 years old and have been active in the car hobby for about 50 of those years. Growing up, my mother's car was a Model A Ford and my father took me to antique car shows early on. I do most of my own car work and have tackled just about everything over the years because I never had the money to farm out the work. Most of my hobby work was on 50s, 60s, and 70s cars because at the time I was working on them they were cheap and plentiful. I have made money on some of the cars if you just look at money spent versus selling price, but if you count anything for the hours of labor I lost my shirt on every one. My biggest problem is that I have historically bought cars for emotional reasons rather than practical - I currently have a 1963 Riviera because our next door neighbor had a new one when I was in Junior High and I always loved the style. I can already tell you I will never get back what I have put into that car but I really like driving it and just looking at it. So I think I am qualified as a "LEGITIMATE car buff".

In this stage of my life I finally have a little money and may actually be able to afford a beautiful antique car. No "Cold Turkey" jumping here, I have researched this car very heavily and am aware of the technology differences, I will not buy without riding or driving the car. My motive in asking about value is that for once I would like to combine a little logic with my emotion and maybe not get screwed financially like I usually do. In the end though, if I can't get any help with values I will probably still buy the Caddy anyway because I LOVE old cars.

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Not much advice here but I can tell you a bit about the '24 Cadillac V-63 as this was the first antique car we ever bought back in '68. I had a few interesting features. Aluminum body as I remember. Also had headlights that could be tilted downwards by use of a knob on the dash attached to a rod that went to the headlights. There was an air compressor on the transmission as well. Ours had Buffalo wire wheels. Ours was missing several crucial engine parts and we finally sold it to a fellow who had a good chassis and drive train but no body. Nice tall interesting car but as you've discovered pre '31 American Classics generally bring less money than their newer counterparts. I say buy what you like, if you eventually make a buck on it consider it "found money", if not then you've had a bit of fun and could at least hope to recoup most of your "investment".

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I have a 1925 Cadillac 7 passenger Suburban. Which is merely a large sedan with two jump seats and no division window. It is the same V-63 setup as the 24 models. Depending on what you want to do with it you will either find it a great car or one you dont like at all. Its basically a top speed 45 MPH car. Anything faster may cause the car to sound as though it is self destructing. You will need to double clutch this car as there was no synchro in them yet. The pressurized fuel system can be tempermental but as long as your pressure gauge works and there are no leaks it is usually pretty reliable. Literature and manuals are fairly easy to obtain. Values of course are anybodys guess and depend largely on condition and body style. I have seen a few closed cars being offered recently in the mid and upper 20's but have no idea what they actually look like. A few years ago a gorgeous 5p open touring with one small patch on the top brought 30k at auction and that car was a great deal as the restoration, other than the top was beautiful. these cars dont come up for sale with any regularity and parts are pretty scarce too. the water pumps require packing with the original material or they will give you real fits. However when everything is sorted out you will have a big car you can drive and enjoy. Good luck!

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Thanks for the information and encouragement. One reason I am approaching this purchase carefully is the large amount of "unknown" for me with a car this old. The all-mechanical presence of it is fascinating to me but it is a drastic change from what I am used to. I probably would have bought the car already but when I went to see it last weekend the owner could not get it started. Actually he started it four times but it loaded up with gas and would not stay running. He is working on the carburetor and I hope to see it driving this weekend.

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I went to see this car again over the weekend. The owner had rebuilt the carburetor and cleaned the filter screens, all four of them in different locations! The car ran well, he took me for a ride and I was able to drive it a short distance. As DaveBerg said, 45 mph was the top speed with the engine revving high but surprisingly smooth. The manual brakes and steering immediately gave me respect for old car owners and reminded me how coddled we have become with our modern cars. We had trouble with coolant leaking from the overflow tank and then the carb started acting up again when he put the car back in the garage. I was impressed enough to make him an offer but we could not agree on a price. I was disappointed but also a little relieved since I already have one project in work. I thanked the gentleman for letting me see and drive a rare beauty and I will continue looking for an older car. Thanks again to all who responded.

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I gave the price guide a look and was very disappointed. I valued early Maxwells and pristine examples from 1905-1908's or so are only priced at $10,000.00. I have never been able to find a pile of junk for that little, so I think an upgrade is in order. I imagine some of you have checked out your cars/models as well and have found similar problems. It's nice that there is at least a source for car values online but one would more appreciative if it was accurate. JO BO

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The AACA Library & Research Center should have plenty of 1911 Caddy info. Copies of their literature would be very useful to you I'm sure.

Terry

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Hi there,

I see you drove in the car but could not come to a deal. I own a 1924 V63 Cadillac 7 seat tourer for 4 years now and it has given me great experiences. I can send you some photos if you want. It has been fully restored 10 years ago and I bought it for around US$30,000. I know the car intimately having rebuilt the engine and checked almost everything. I am about to look at the differential. My car drives well in the 45 to 50 mph range but has the lowest diff ratio of the 3 offered in 1924. I have located a high ratio and will look to fit that. There are some critical things to fix and replace to keep it going one of them being a redesigned 'blade" connecting rod. If you need anymore informaiton feel free to contact me. I have quite a bit of literature and the original build sheet for my car from GM archives. Good luck.

Cheers

Grant P

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A local auto wholsaler had a 1925 Cadillac 4 door sedan that he paid $25,000

for and sold it for a small profit last fall. Good driveable, presentable car that would need a total restoration to be shown. I think he was lucky to make anything on it, but somebody was happy to get it.

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I have a 1924 Cadillac for sale. It is a nice running and looking original. It runs and drives very well and the only thing that has been done is the wheels repainted and professionally re pin striped. It has 6 tires 5 which are brand new. We have driven the Cadillac about 500 miles in 4 years. You may contact me via email or 207 944 3128. Jim.

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