Jump to content

Subject for discussion


Restorer32
 Share

Recommended Posts

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I like to think our Class Judging system is pretty good, however, we are not perfect.</div></div>

Very true, Dave. But unless someone has held a national office such as yourself, most people would never be able to comprehend the workload and effort that you, the other national directors, and Steve put forth to give the rest of us a good club. It is very easy to look at one side of things and see something that is seen different by some individuals who can see both sides of an issue.

Being aware of the out of pocket expenses that my dad and I spend getting a vehicle (sometimes two) onto a showfield for a handfull of meets each year, It scares me when I look at the money that is spent by the national officers who travel to all of the events, let alone the meetings and activities that take place behind closed doors that no one is aware of.

What makes the club as good as it is, is based on the fact that we all have strenghts and weaknesses that compliment each other. I know in the few short years that I've been around, I know that Joe Vicini knows GM cars very well, Randy Stone knows Mustangs, Ed Peterson knows fire trucks, Eric Marsh knows a lot about tires, while Fred Young is good with chassis. Individually those five individuals are not subject matter experts on everything, but from a collective standpoint, those five people have a lot of knowledge that easily pick up the slack in many classes.

The advantage of what I have seen on our class judging system is that the group involved have been very open minded and willing to make change as they felt was necessary. How can anyone find fault with that??

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the very nice comments. Your board does indeed work hard at making AACA the great organization that it is. Often at great personal expense. Your comments showing the appreciation of the devotion of these many men and women will go along way. It is the only "pay" they receive. It doesnt stop with board either. All of the various chairpople, committe members, Region officers etc all play an integral part in AACA's operation.

As for the question on the Bugatti Childs Electric Car of 1927. In my opinion that vehicle would not be eligible for AACA judging as it was never intended as a road vehicle to be used as transportation. It was merely a toy for the wealthy, though I am unfamiliar with the traffic laws in Europe during that period and it is possible that there is some law or omission of others that could make it ok. I do know that at least one has snuck through the cracks and won an award at a National Meet. Fortunately that was a long time ago.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Restorer32</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Google Crosley Farm-O-Road tractor. </div></div>

Actually the FarmOroad was both a pickup and a tractor and licensed for the road. The way Willys tried to market the Jeep with farm equipment to be used as a tractor. By most peoples definition the FarmOroad didn't do well as a car or a tractor.

There is an FOR next to this posting, my avatar is me driving my FarmOroad. I put a few hundred miles a year on it driving the roads, but have not done any farming with it yet :-)

I do try to dress it for the show I'm at, it is going to a tractor show this weekend so I will put the dual wheels on. Truck shows it is shown without the dual wheels. Car shows I leave off the dual wheels and add the striped top.

http://www.jebs-stuff.com/Misc/FOR_FullLoad.jpg

http://www.ggw.org/cac/FarmOroads_Picture_Album.html

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That looks like a valid argument in favor of tractors to me.

Of course the point could be argued is how in many states, some tractors were never registered for highway use. On the flip side, in New York State, fire department owned fire trucks don't have to be registered, while in other states they do. Being that our fire truck is privately owned, was built and used in New York State, we had to create a license plate bracket for a truck that never had a license plate bracket when it left the factory.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I made an interesting observation while at the tractor show Friday and Saturday. There is a large range of age groups participating. From small kids, to teenagers all the way up to the gray hairs on handicap scouters. They don't seem to be having our problem of getting young people interested.

Not sure what the secret is. They do have activities that actually involves running and driving their exhibits which may attract younger people. No judging so no pressure to spend big bucks for a restoration.

One draw that can not be duplicated in AACA since laws prohibit young drivers and we may have already lost them by the time they can. At the show young teens were participating in tractor pulls and younger ones get to do peddle tractor pulls.

Well anyway I hadn't thought about that difference before and thought I would mention it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Last year at the AACA Staten Island New York Show there was a 1950's Garbage truck there along with other NYC Vintage vehicles from the Police and Fire Departments as well as a specially built Parade car that digntaries used over the years. So there you go.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...