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WTB Packard Air Conditioning Parts 1940-1942


Joe Block
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  • 1 month later...

I am currently taking an A/C class at the University of Northwestern Ohio and was wondering if i could get some pictures of the trunk unit. My textbook says that Packard was the first ever company to put A/C in their vehicles (1939). Thanks, Jarred

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I'll try to get you a photo quickly. Yes, Packard was first. It was introduced in the fall of 1939 on the 1940 models and continued through the 1942 models. Air was dropped until around 1954. Cadillac followed suit in 1941 with the exact same system. I don't think they offered it in 1942.

My car is a 1940. My engine compartment (before a correct detailing) is the last picture shown above.

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Alright, finally someone who can get me a picture or two! I've been looking forever for someone who has pictures. If its not too much to ask i'd like to know a little more about the system and have some close-up pictures of the system. I appreciate your time and effort. thanks, Jarred

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Jarred

I'm on LONG days at work this week, and I'll be out of town during the weekend. I hope next week sometime will not be too late for you. I can make some photocopies of the description of the system for you as well. Also, feel free to drop down to Dayton for your own personal peak at the car.

If you're ever in the Warren area, the Packard museum there used to have a complete system on display. I'd call, first, though, if you plan on making a special trip. The display was owned by a private individual, and it may not be there anymore. If it is still on display, perhaps a call and a plea to them to take a photo and email to you would be in order.

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Jarred, the system is entirely conventional in principle. If you've had a enthalpy diagram in your class (thermodynamics basis for virtually all mechanical refrigeration), that's how it works. Compression, expansion, condensation cycle. Gas-to-gas heat exchangers. Remember that mechanical refrigeration (air conditioning) systems had been installed in buildings in the 1930's - the trick was to devise a mobile system compact enough to go in a car and be powered by the engine.

A Packard of this era with air conditioning, dual heaters, and power windows had quite complicated plunbing for the time.

A related option was to have a "cellerette" build into the back of the front seat, providing a refrigerator for the rear seat passengers. The air conditioning lines passing fore and aft could detour to do this job. The first example of the currently in vogue chilled glove boxes? Another Packard first?

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bkazmer,

Wow. That is some good information. Do you know what type of metering device they used? I'm not familiar with the older vehicles, but I have heard of a (FOT) or Fixed orifice tube, (TXV) or a Thermostatic expansion valve, or even an H-block. I appreciate the info!

West Peterson,

Unfortunately I live in Defiance county and I commute to school every day. Although I might just give the museum a call and see what they can do as well. I totally understand about working. I might only be a college student but working and then going to school gets pretty long. Whenever you get the time is fine by me, I'm in no hurry. I appreciate it.

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not sure but I think just fixed orifice.

A teething problem of this system can be seen on West's photos - the compressor is belt driven and so rpm varies with engine speed. Go faster and get colder.

West, isn't the original working fluid ammonia?

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I think the biggest "teething" problem was that there was no clutch on the compressor. It was always "on." Yes, you had a fan switch that you could turn on and off, but if you were going down the road, as bkazmer says, it would blow anyway. When the compressor belt was on, cold air was coming out. This was the reason for the dual heaters mentioned. In the spring and fall, it got downright cold inside the car. In fact, in the middle of summer, I've been told it will freeze you out. (I don't know yet, cuz I'm still trying to get the car to run reliably. I'll work on the air, next)

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My professor told me that the Packards used a TXV valve to monitor the refrigerant flow. He also told the class that they would freeze you out cause there was no way of turning it off. So I believe that you're right. Sorry it took me so long to post, I've been pretty busy with rebuilding the engine in one of my cars.

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Joe

I haven't even started looking into working on my system yet, so I don't have a clue. I know there's some sort of unit about halfway between the engine compartment and the trunk (a wide spot in the road, if you will), and I don't know exactly what that is either. I know it's all mentioned in the diagram I have, but I haven't looked at it for a while. Priorities.

My plan is to bring the car to Hershey this year, so if you're at Hershey, give me a call and I'll be happy to let you look at anything you want. 937- 478-6613.

Also, I'd be happy to delivery that compressor that I told you about last year. He hasn't budged on his price.

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I got Hershey on my master leave schedule, but it has not been submit for the actual leave cycle yet. I get tired of the complaining everythime i ask for time off. I get 6 week year and it like pulling teeth. the Bosses alw awant the same windows, i was bumped this summer six week, it screwed up the entire summer, so the family did not get a proper vacation at all.

Well i screwed out of Hershey trip the bOss want to take off, so he bump my leave off the schedule, thiis is the second time this has happen in year, and he only been here less than year. Selfish.

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