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Willie_B

1910 Q3 Engine Lubrication

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Hi all,

I have recently purchased a 1910 Maxwell model Q3. I would very much appreciate if anybody

could advise me on the correct method of lubricating the engine. It appears from looking in the crankcase that it would need to have some oil for splash feed of the main bearings, is this correct?. If so how much oil is necessary, I have found that any more than half a pint results in a lot of smoke. Also what rate of drip should I set on the sight feed?. To avoid damage to the engine if anyone can help I would be very greatful.

Willie

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Willie--The following is information from the 1910 Model Book:

Oiling--Force-feed, multi-delivery. Single sight feed located on dash in view of operator: automatically oils motor and clutch.

Tank Capacity: oil, 2 quarts.

From the 1911 Instruction Book:

Mounted on the dash underneath the hood will be found an aluminum oil tank. This should be filled to the top of the filling plug with a good grade of cylinder oil... The oil from this tank is forced by a pump thru the single sight feed located on the dashboard.... All the oil used by the engine passes through this single sight feed oiler in a constant stream when the motor is running. Leaving the ... sight glass the oil is fed into the first compartment of the crank case ... the constant flow successively filling the base of each compartment in its course to ... the fourth compartment, where it is pumped back. By means of spoon-like splash blades the oil is picked up from the basin at the bottom of each compartment and vaporized, affording ample and effective lubrication of all necessary parts.

If you're getting smoke, I assume it is from oil sucking up past the rings. They may be gummed up. Especially if the car hasn't run for a while. Perhaps some Marvin's Mystery Oil will free them???

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Chuck,

Many thanks for for reply. It appears I shouldn't be putting any oil in the crankcase.

I had seen the 1911 manual on the maxwell-messenger site but the engine is is different to

mine. My engine does not have the return feed to the tank or the wells under the con rods.

It is as the engine pic in the 1910 brochure shown on the same site. The engine runs very well

and without smoke if I reduce the oil level in the crankcase, but as the middle and rear mains are

are oviously fed by splash I though I had to have some level of oil in the crankcase to start with.

Many Thanks

Willie

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