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  1. Keith there is no service manual for the 28 standard six that I'm aware of. I got the info from the Dodge Brothers six cylinder 140 series operation and care manual. It's actually quite indepth. Myers has a CD for the victory six that is fantastic and since we share the same drivetrain with the victory ( minus it hydraulic brakes) it's great.
  2. With this past weekend weather not good enough to enjoy a ride, took the evening off today to get that open air feeling again! Went to the Wednesday night Cruise-In and when pulling in noticed this green Dodge with a spot open beside it. Just had to park beside her as it looked along the condition of mine, not restored to show, appearing original and sure enough, it was a 1958! We drew a bit of a crowd after a bit and when he opened his hood, sure enough it has it's original flathead six with standard steering and standard brakes. I thought it was interesting to see
  3. Hi folks. I am in need of a speedometer housing for a 1928 Dodge Brothers Standard Six. I am hopeful other Dodge models of era may use the same housing. If you have one you’d be willing to sell please let me know. Thanks, Keith.
  4. Robert B has it right. 1928 Standard Six Dodge Brothers. Note dash instruments. Engine both sides. Cardan shaft handbrake.
  5. Hi folks. I am in need of a speedometer housing for a 1926 Dodge Brothers car. The car is a Standard Six however I am hoping other models may use same. If you happen to have a spare you are willing to sell or a parts car to pull one please contact me. Thanks. Keith
  6. 1928 to1929 dodge brothers standard six, victory six and da oil pump by my samples and matchinf part numbers bob
  7. Well, my car will appear the same. I have 4 original wheels, and found 2 very close matches for the spares. They are 18s but very narrow....because it's a entry level Six chassis. If you could find the picture I posted of the 32 Six sedan that ran the Great race for decades, the SIA "drive report" says he switched to wider 17s, for better handling in the races. I have no clue where he found wider 17s to fit the Sixty Series bolt pattern, yet still run the same big hubcap. It can't be from a 70 Series, as Chad on here said his Dad bolted on a 1950s Dodge wheel on his 70, to haul
  8. Hi I am in need of a pair of headlights for a Dodge Brothers 1928 Standard Six. Does not have to be exact match replacement. Will consider other period correct lights. A cab heater core would also be great. Thx. Shipped to 98295 USA. Thx. Keith
  9. My girlfriend got a '64 Dodge Dart 270 Convertible with a 225 /6 and a 904 push button tranny, nice little car but the carb is a bit of a letdown. It stumbles at quarter gas and with prolonged gas. It's a worn down Holley 1920 H1 R6155 and a carb kit did only so much. It now even has this vacuum squeal coming from within after a garage looked it over. Now I'm thinking of a replacement carb but refurbished carbs are expensive and are also prone to create problems due to wear of passages and the butterfly valve stem cylinder and the like. So so what are the best alterna
  10. Had the carpenter out today. He came and fit the wood on the spot since we don't have any of the bottom wood. Only a few more pieces he'll need to do this for. I've been a little busy getting a model A running that sat for 20 years and a '29 dodge brothers (DA Deluxe? Standard Six? Not sure) made it to my place on Wednesday. Oh well!
  11. Sunday morning and having another look at this one. My sources here are The Standard Catalog (1982 edition) and the Crestline book Studebaker cars. Another thing which might go against this car is that for 1933 the Commander and Dictator were the same size car. The Dictator had an 85 hp 230 cid six and the Commander a 100 hp 235 cid eight, a variant of the eight cylinder engine that was only used that year. Studebaker had a complex range of cars which was constantly changing, with regular and Deluxe version of every model. Like others I guess they were just trying to maintain sales. The big Sp
  12. Keithb7, I may have some 1928 Dodge Standard Six headlight buckets, I just have to locate them. Let me know if you're interested in them.
  13. 1928-29 Model A Ford on the left. Car in the back looks like maybe an Essex with suicide doors and a custom roof. Car in front on the right looks a lot like a 1928 Dodge Brothers Standard Six, but the hubs look smaller. Just guesses on the last two.
  14. Dual sidemounts were, as far as I am aware, always an option on the commercial vehicles, at least as far as the commercial sedan and commercial panel (humpback) were concerned. Examples: The January 1933 Sales brochure for the "New Finer, More Beautiful Dodge Commercial Sedan" lists "six wheels mounted in fender wells" as available "EXTRA EQUIPMENT". The April 1934 sales brochure for the KC and KCL lists the same "EXTRA EQUIPMENT". The May 1935 sales brochure for the KC and KCL has similar language, "six wheels with spares mounting in fender wells". While none of those show a left (driver
  15. Sorry to butt in. Always something to learn from reading peoples input. I guess I was lucky to buy a rare car. I just hauled my new addition from Nevada to Texas. A 1929 Dodge Brothers Standard Six. Hearing its a rare model makes me even more excited about returning it back to its glory. My car is titled 1929 but as you all probably know, was actually built in 1928. Frame number is J-46XXX but the engine has J-60XXX. When removing the front bumpers I also noticed a 28 stamped on the bumper bracket. Its in great shape except for the carburetor, and distributor, ( curse of Medusa ) and it has no
  16. Four-Wheel Hydraulic Brake History Malcolm Loughead vs. Frederick S. Duesenberg: The Case of Bragging Rights to the First Four-Wheel Hydraulic Brakes Plus A *Footnote to Automotive History Bert A. Linderman, Stutz, And the Timken Hydrostatic Brake Loughead vs. Duesenberg The names of two men are commonly associated with the advent of hydraulic brakes. They are Californian Malcolm Loughead and Frederick S. Duesenberg of Indianapolis. Loughead filed for his first of many hydraulic brake patents on January 22, 1917 (left below). His filing illustrates an external-contracting-band
  17. Yes I do know where one of these lathes can be found, it is in my machine shop. Over the next two weeks it will machine bearings for a English Riley engine ,a Dodge Brothers Standard Six , a big end bearing for a stationary engine and if the days are long enough may be my own 128 engine. Bob
  18. The Spitfire marking on the head indicates a Chrysler flathead six. The number C48 indicates it came from a 1950 Chrysler Royal or Windsor. C48S = Royal 6, C48W = Windsor 6. They were identical in bore, stroke and horsepower. I don't know what the difference is if any. Bore and stroke, 3 7/16 X 4 1/2. Displacement 250.6 cu in. Horsepower 116@3600. Torque 208 ft lbs @ 1600. Oil pressure 45lbs@45MPH. This would make an excellent engine for a 54 Dodge pickup. If the pickup was made in Canada it will bolt right in. If it was US made you may have to make room at the front of the engine by moving th
  19. The Dodge seems to decode where first digit tells the build plant and second if it's six or V8, like he said that's it. Was 1958 before you got any more information from them. Your Stude info - 7808233 = Los Angeles built President (starting was 7805001). Presidents came standard with a 259 V8. 6H = President C5 = 2dr coupe body The rest is just the body number. All this info is probably in the Krause Standard Catalog of American Cars, I forget what years they cover but one is like 1945-1980 or so. I have the individual books for each make, most of the independents are in one book, all
  20. I'm more interested in the standard 1940-54 rear end as used in my 51 DeSoto. Would like to have a more relaxed hiway gear. Was this diff used after 54? Was it used in any other cars? Specifically I would like to find a higher gear ration(lower numerical) than the 3.9 in my car. Apparently they used a 3.54 in the late 40s. Is there a higher ratio than that? By the way am rebuilding a 265 flathead six for this car so it should be able to swing a higher gear. No original cars are being harmed by this swap. The engine in the car now is out of a 53 Dodge pickup truck and has a cracked block. The r
  21. The unspoken assumption in all the above was that the mods would be part of an engine rebuild. Unless your engine has recently been rebuilt and you know the bearings pistons etc are in good condition I suggest you leave it alone. I have seen several older cars that the owners modified for more speed that blew up within a couple of months. If they had left them alone they would have gone on for thousands of trouble free miles. So now my rule is do not modify an engine with over 50,000 miles on it unless you give it an overhaul at the same time. You do not have to take out the engine to change t
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