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George_Kubovcik

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About George_Kubovcik

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  1. Richard - Below is an excerpt from the '46 - '48 Chrysler club on Yahoo regarding values for the business coupes (this was not written by me but by another yahoo group member.) They are in the same league as a convertible, having said this, they are no where near as valuble as the Town and Country wood cars. A #1 C38 Biz Coupe is worth in the neighbourhood of $20000.00 to $25000.00, very few of these, they are flawless 100% stock, and not driven usually, #2 is very close tho this, but is driven a bit, but all componenets are mint, worth $15000 to $20000, # 3 is a nice fixed up car, most cars a
  2. Richard - Below is an excerpt from the '46 - '48 Chrysler club on Yahoo regarding values for the business coupes (this was not written by me but by another yahoo group member.) They are in the same league as a convertible, having said this, they are no where near as valuble as the Town and Country wood cars. A #1 C38 Biz Coupe is worth in the neighbourhood of $20000.00 to $25000.00, very few of these, they are flawless 100% stock, and not driven usually, #2 is very close tho this, but is driven a bit, but all componenets are mint, worth $15000 to $20000, # 3 is a nice fixed up car, most cars a
  3. Richard - In addition to my '47 Windsor club coupe I have a '61 Willys Station wagon. In a restoration/parts book from a Willys vendor the vendor states that you should be prepared to spend as much on the restoration as it would cost for a new car (i.e. I'd say $25,000). Now you can certainly reduce that figure by as much as half if you do all (95%) of the work yourself. Bottom line I'd guess (this is a total guess) if you were to bring the car back to mint it would still only bring $20,000 to $30,000 based on the fact it's a mopar. I also believe within the mopar community the rareness of the
  4. Richard - In addition to my '47 Windsor club coupe I have a '61 Willys Station wagon. In a restoration/parts book from a Willys vendor the vendor states that you should be prepared to spend as much on the restoration as it would cost for a new car (i.e. I'd say $25,000). Now you can certainly reduce that figure by as much as half if you do all (95%) of the work yourself. Bottom line I'd guess (this is a total guess) if you were to bring the car back to mint it would still only bring $20,000 to $30,000 based on the fact it's a mopar. I also believe within the mopar community the rareness of the
  5. Jim - Yes any competent engine builder can rebuild the engine (i.e. 251 cubic inch flat head six). All bearings, pistons, connecting rods etc. are available for purchase from several antique parts vendors. If you have the space and time the rebuild is not insanely difficult and is certainly in the skill level of a shade tree mechanic. Also, I'd reccomend purchasing a shop manual (these are available in reprint) as it will become your best freind if you do get the car.
  6. Jim - Yes any competent engine builder can rebuild the engine (i.e. 251 cubic inch flat head six). All bearings, pistons, connecting rods etc. are available for purchase from several antique parts vendors. If you have the space and time the rebuild is not insanely difficult and is certainly in the skill level of a shade tree mechanic. Also, I'd reccomend purchasing a shop manual (these are available in reprint) as it will become your best freind if you do get the car.
  7. If you are looking for an investment don't buy an antique car. At least not something less than concours (i.e. V16 cadilac, dusenberg etc). Mopar vehicles have traditionally lagged behind GM and Ford in value. In my opinion, the rareness of the '46 - '48 chrysler business coupe will command a premium over the other '46 - '48 chrysler body styles (with the exception of the convertible. Duh!) but will still not approach the '55 chevy in value.
  8. If you are looking for an investment don't buy an antique car. At least not something less than concours (i.e. V16 cadilac, dusenberg etc). Mopar vehicles have traditionally lagged behind GM and Ford in value. In my opinion, the rareness of the '46 - '48 chrysler business coupe will command a premium over the other '46 - '48 chrysler body styles (with the exception of the convertible. Duh!) but will still not approach the '55 chevy in value.
  9. Jim - Business coupes are very rare. The New Yorker being the rarest of all. I have a 1947 Windsor Club Coupe (i.e. I have a back seat) and there were only 27,000 Windsor Club Coupes made from '46 - '48. You might want to check out the yahoo group link below. You can search the messages for business coupe to get some more detailed info. http://autos.groups.yahoo.com/group/46-48Chryslers/
  10. Jim - Business coupes are very rare. The New Yorker being the rarest of all. I have a 1947 Windsor Club Coupe (i.e. I have a back seat) and there were only 27,000 Windsor Club Coupes made from '46 - '48. You might want to check out the yahoo group link below. You can search the messages for business coupe to get some more detailed info. http://autos.groups.yahoo.com/group/46-48Chryslers/
  11. Richard - Business coupes are very rare. The New Yorker being the rarest of all. I have a 1947 Windsor Club Coupe (i.e. I have a back seat) and there were only 27,000 Windsor Club Coupes made from '46 - '48. You might want to check out the yahoo group link below. You can search the messages for business coupe to get some more detailed info. http://autos.groups.yahoo.com/group/46-48Chryslers/
  12. Richard - Business coupes are very rare. The New Yorker being the rarest of all. I have a 1947 Windsor Club Coupe (i.e. I have a back seat) and there were only 27,000 Windsor Club Coupes made from '46 - '48. You might want to check out the yahoo group link below. You can search the messages for business coupe to get some more detailed info. http://autos.groups.yahoo.com/group/46-48Chryslers/
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