John Gelfer

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Everything posted by John Gelfer

  1. Golf balls won't work in the model T tank. There is less than 1/2" gap under the tank baffles, so no balls will roll under. No pressure washer nozzle will fit either. You need a good solvent, or a new tank.
  2. Does anyone have one of these for sale? I just missed one last week on ebay. It sure would help me out in getting my 1928 Gardner running. Gardner shop manuals are near impossible to find.
  3. The radiator shop tried, and failed me. I think they tried to use a pressure washer with hot soapy water. It might work on some tanks, but the Model T tank baffles are so close to the bottom, that they could not get beyond the first baffle. I just solved my Model T problem with a new tank from Snyders. Too bad I can't do the same for my 1928 Gardner. I might look into Tank Renu.
  4. I've tried having my tank cleaned out at a radiator shop. I sloshed around a gallon of parts cleaner in it too. I still get varnish clogs in the fuel petcock after driving a few miles. The tank is not rusty inside, and I don't want to acid wash it, which would ruin the zinc plating inside. I think the baffles inside the tank made it hard for the radiator shop to do a good job. Someone told me that acetone would work. The tank sat with old gas in it for about 8 years. I have another one in a similar condition too. Anyone out there have some advice?
  5. I have a 1912 Model T roadster. I recently had some trouble with running at higher speeds. It started and idled OK, but would die when I tried to get it going. Turned out to be fuel flow issues. Some sludge was only allowing a trickle of gas through the sediment bulb petcock. You might also check compression. The valves may be in good condition, but if not properly timed, you will not get much power. Please let me know when you get it running correctly.
  6. The July issue of Architectural Digest has a fabulous section:"Motoring by Design". It features the extensive collection of American made automobiles owned by Nicola Bulgari, as well as a feature on the new Lincoln MKT concept car. You will drool when you see some of these vehicles pictured in his 10,000 sq. ft. garage. This is worth seeing. Most book stores should have it.
  7. Ouch! I just took apart a Stromberg SFM updraft carb that belongs in my '28 Gardner. When the top half came off, the venturi broke off where it enters the lower casting. It is supposed to be a friction fit, but was seized together. Looks like I'm going to have to get one machined somewhere. Extracting the broken off piece without damaging the brass body will be a real challenge too. The Carburetor Shop in Eldon MO says he is about 2 years behind on that kind of work. I want to drive my car this summer! I don't know of any other shops that could do it. Any suggestions out there?
  8. The original Kissel plant in Hartford WI is now a museum. They have more than 25 K cars, in addition to lots of other rare autos, and the people there probably know more about Kissel than anyone else. Wisconsin Automotive Museum 147 N Rural Street Hartford WI 53027 (262) 673-7999 Good Luck!
  9. I'm used to the Model T timing, where you push the control lever all the way UP to retard the spark for starting. I now have a 1928 Gardner with the Lycoming 226 straight 8, with a Delco distributor. I was told that I should pull the lever DOWN to retard the spark on this car. Before I attempt to start it, I sure would like to know the correct answer.
  10. Thanks for the help. It is an Alemite pin-type fitting. I'll see if I can find an adapter nearby, or order one online.
  11. I can't figure out what type of fitting is used to grease the spring shackles on my 1928 Gardner. It is not Zerk, and not the old button type. It has a flat top, with two guide pins that stick out on the sides. The manual calls for Gargoyle Mobiloil C to be pumped in. Does that equate to 90W oil? I need the correct gun also.
  12. I own a 1912 Ford Model T roadster that was originally restored in the 1950's. The side lamps are E & J, but they say "Patent Applied For" instead of "Patented Dec 9 1908" like all Model T brass lamps. The front lens is round and beveled, (not square like it should be) with a nice brass flair around it. Are these lamps from an earlier Ford car?
  13. I own a 1912 Ford Model T roadster that was originally restored in the 1950's. The side lamps are E & J, but they say "Patent Applied For" instead of "Patented Dec 9 1908" like all Model T brass lamps. The front lens is round and beveled, (not square like it should be) with a nice brass flair around it. Are these lamps from an earlier Ford car?
  14. Thanks for the help. What is this product that Bill Hirsch makes, and where can I buy it? John
  15. Any advice on cleaning varnish deposits left from eight years of old gasoline sitting in a tank? I'm hoping I don't have to remove it to do it properly. Would POR 15 Marine Clean work? I saw it online, and wondered if it was the right stuff. I know enough to avoid corrosives like muriatic acid. Thanks