Wayne_Koffel

Members
  • Content Count

    36
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

0 Neutral

About Wayne_Koffel

  • Rank
    Member
  1. I need four fenders, two running board aprons, and a six cylinder Oakland engine transported from the San Francisco-Sacramento area to Eastern, Pennsylvania. Call 610-217-5862 anytime.
  2. I need four fenders and a six cylinder Oakland engine brought back from the San Francisco-Sacramento area to the eastern Pennsylvania-Northern New Jersey area sometime before February. Does anybody have some extra room in a trailer or in the back of a pick-up? Call Wayne at 610-217-5862 and let's work something out.
  3. It definitely has the design details of a 31 Oakland trans, however as I stated previously, it has been altered. First of all, the shield logo indicates that it could be no earlier than 1928 as Oakland didn't cast the shield into anything before that year. Secondly the two protruding supports for the trans to the frame only were made for 1930-31 and possibly for a 32 Pontiac that used parts designed for what should have been a 32 Oakland. Third, this vintage of trans is the only Oakland trans that used two bolts per side to bolt it to the frame. Upon further inspection the casting date of the trans appears to be 1-12-32 so it could possibly be a design change intended for a 32 Oakland and used in a 32 Pontiac instead. Additionally, it appears as though major welding has taken place to the initial trans housing. So while it is NOT a trans that would have been used on a 31 Oakland, it IS an Oakland trans whose design was based on a 31 Oakland transmission. Having just come from my garage and having matched the picture to the transmissions I have, the casting number of 553511 is consistent with numbers on transmissions I have. Maybe someone with an early Pontiac parts book could find this number.
  4. Your transmission appears to be a 1931 Oakland transmission that somebody has appeared to put an overdrive unit on. It is definitely a 31 Oakland trans.
  5. Tom, I believe we talked a few weeks ago. As I told you then it is a 1915 and the gentleman who told you he knows the car, is probably correct that it was made to look older. The car was here at my garage when the previous owner tried to sell it and myself and three other OOCI club members looked it over , showed the owners how to run it correctly, told them what was wrong with the car, explained what was the probable history of the car, and gave them our overall assessment of the value. It is what it is. It was an export car that was bodied in either Australia or New Zealand.
  6. I came and looked at this car about six years ago. It is definitely a 1916 four cylinder Oakland. If memory serves, the owner wanted $2500. or thereabouts. It was inside an old barn on abandoned property. I was interested because of the rarity of the engine but the car was worse than rough. The frame was rotted in many spots, no wood for patterns and as rough as it looks in these pictures , it's worse in person. I walked away. I even had a trailer with me to take it home.
  7. I believe I can answer a few of your questions. I won't trash any tires but the better quality the tire, the better the balance. In other words, a B.F. Goodrich or Firestone might be easier to balance. Lester is not as expensive as most other tires and is sold as a cheaper alternative to the name brands. Oaklands , along with any straight axle front end eventually requires some type of adjustment. The shimmy you experience could be from balance but is more likely caused by a minute bending of the axle from years of use. The manual tells you to remove the axle and straighten and you can do that, but at the same time the the factory was telling their dealers that, they were sending bullitens to use tapered shims between the axle and the springs. Most were put in back to front but it would depend on how it is bent. They may have to go front to back. I just helped a friend do that on an old Lincoln and it took about fourty minutes and took away the shimmy. As far as balancing goes, you could use balance beads (not a fan of this), strobe light balance ( many truck dealers do this), or balance yourself using stick on weights to balance then replace with normal wheel weights. Wayne Koffel, President and Tech Director Oakland Owners Club International, Inc.
  8. It is actually fairly easy to do. Take the rear differential cover off. Make sure you have something to allow the grease to drip into. Look inside and you'll see a square block in the center of the ring gear. There is a pin that goes thru the ring gear and that block. There is a screw that holds the pin in. Unscrew the lock screw, push out the pin (if it doesn't already fall out), pull the square block out and remove the axles by pulling them out. Re-assemble the same way, just be carefull the small gears inside are not disturbed. But if they are, just put them back in place.
  9. I posted this the other day when I told you that you need to remove the axle to get to the inner seal. When you took the wheel and drum off, the old outer seal might have come with it. If not, it is fairly easy to put the tip of a screwdriver under the seal and pop it out. If it is the originasl seal, it will be a piece of felt between a steel plate with a lip. It may come apart when removing it. The replacement outer seals are mostly 2 thinner seals making up the thickness of the old original seal. The next to come out is the roller bearing. You could use a strong magnet or make a little hook with a wire to pull it out. However the shop manual tells you to remove the axle to get to the bearing, let alone the inner seal. When you figure out how to remove the inner seal without removing the axle, let me know . Wayne Koffel President and Tech Director, Oakland Owners Club International
  10. I'm confused. Is this a Pontiac or an Oakland ? Oakland made Pontiac. Sometimes I see questions like this and they are Oakland cars and sometimes Pontiacs. The cars are different and parts are different. I have many parts for Oaklands, none for Pontiacs. Wayne Koffel President & Tech Director Of Oakland Owners Club International
  11. Sometimes, in fact in many cases, a wheel puller WILL NOT remove the drum and wheel. I have personally had to remove the whole axle and use a press at the machine shop to press the axle out. And it let go with such force that it cracked the concrete floor. When using that wheel puller, don't stand behind it if it lets go. If your lucky enough to get it off, there is an inner and outer seal. It is necessary to remove the axle to get the inner seal. And cleam up the tapered spline and hole in drum before putting together. Using some "never seize " when reinstalling will make it easier to remove next time. Wayne koffel President and Tech Director, Oakland Owners Club, International
  12. To Tinindian: In 1929 Oakland used a regular 6 volt coil. The coil with the ignition switch on it did not come until 1930. And those coils ARE available new but are very expensive. I don't know if Pontiac used that coil in 1929 but Oakland did not !
  13. I have both bumpers and both are rechromeable. However, I would like original bumpers that don't have peeling chrome. Thanks anyhow.
  14. Need front and rear bumpers with serviceable chrome . Also need sparkplug wire cover and fan blade and pulley for 320 straight eight. 610-498-3164 or 610-217-5862, wkoakland@hotmail.com
  15. Open trailer to Gillette, Wyoming from Eastern Pa.. Leaving around October 28th. Will haul for help with fuel. 610-498-3164.