Arniland

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About Arniland

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    hillclimber. com
  1. My wife, who has worked with a number of her vintage straw hats and my boaters, suggests just misting it with water. Get it well dampened and then, with a layer of wax paper on the brim, put some flat weights around the brim with it setting on a flat surface. Give it as much time to dry as it needs. You may have to repeat the process a few times. Before you start, consider removing the outside ribbon to keep the water from damaging it. Arn
  2. Floivanus, I don't think that you should have too much trouble finding used parts. A few thoughts if I might. First off, you don't state in your profile where you are. This might bring an invitation to drop by from someone local. Secondly, I would encourage you to join other early Pontiac owners. The Early Times Pontiac folks which to which Bob and I belong has over 300 members who own Pontiacs made in 1954 or earlier. The six you have was produced in various forms from 1935 through 1954. There were changes and I am on the road away from my parts books, so I cannot check the range of years which might help you. As Bob suggested, the street rodders often pulled the sixes to put in V-8s. These engines should not go for too much if you can find a local street rodder with one. Arn
  3. Iryna, I would point you to the Early Times Chapter of POCI. Our exclusive focus is flathead Pontiacs which includes 1926 through 1954. A quick check of the roster shows 23 members with 1940 Pontiacs. That said, The 8 cylinder engine in the '40s was built in various versions from 1933 through 1954. The sixes were built from 1935 through 1954. There is a LOT commonality over the years. We publish a 16 page monthly newsletter. As a member, you get free advertising in the newsletter. For more information, please check out the website, www.earlytimeschapter.org . While there are some issues unique to the '40, I suspect that you will find many more which cover a range of years. Arnold
  4. Somewhere in the last months I remember seeing someone who had for sale a rubber mat for 1937 Pontiacs. Unfortunately I failed to note where that ad was. If someone saw this and can point me to it, I would appreciate it. Thanks in advance, Arn
  5. I want to thank all of the folks with early Pontiacs who stopped by the Early Times Chapter spot on the Hershey field last week. We enjoyed hearing from quite a few of you and signed up 13 new members. Most exciting to me was that most of the new members had pre-war cars, my personal favorites. We plan to be at this location next year, so please plan to stop by and visit again. This year we initiated a Thursday evening dinner for the early (flathead) Pontiac owners at Hershey and had a turnout of 17. We have a local restaurant who made us a place in this very busy week. Plan for this again next year. Early Times is considering being on the vendor field at the AACA event in April at Charlotte. If you attend this event, please look for us. Arn
  6. Bill, I have to disagree with you about the difficulty in finding a replacement block. I've owned my '37 2819 for only 2 years, but in buying up some spare parts in that time, I now own 2 6 cylinder '37 engines and a late 40s eight. All have been part of packages which included the engines. Do a little looking around and I'm sure that you will be able to find a rebuildable block. I'm just sorry that you don't live a little closer. ;-) You don't mention if you are looking for a 6 or an 8. Arn
  7. Joseph - I've been really sliced and diced, so only just saw your post. Not sure if this is too late, but I have found the Manheim Goldbook for Classic Cars (http://www.manheimgold.com/) to be helpful. Their prices seem to be in line. Others may well disagree, but take a look yourself. I hope this is useful. Arn
  8. I am researching the conversion of the original twin head Pontiac 6 engines for marine use. What I have thus far indicates that they were converted by Grey from 1926 through at least 1931. I have found an original installation in a 1931 , 18 foot Chris Craft runabout as well as cabin boats around 28 feet in length. Can anyone out there point me to other existing examples, photos and/or any documentation? Thanks in advance for any help, Arn
  9. As the others have said, thanks for those who took the trouble to make this available. I am the Secretary Treasurer of the Early Times Chapter, POCI. Anyone wishing a sample copy of our monthly newsletter, ETCetera, please just send me an e-mail. I will e-mail a copy of the last issue. Arn