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idrjoe_sandiego

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Posts posted by idrjoe_sandiego

  1. stakeside-

    "Not sure how to remove main shaft. It is frozen solid."

     

    Trying to understand the problem. Are you referring to the shaft that your speedometer cable connects to?  If so, I am correct in assuming you were attempting to rotate that shaft manually (with a small screwdriver or whatever) and it refuses to rotate? I am also assuming you have soaked it in your favorite penetrating oil and it still wont budge?

  2. On 6/9/2021 at 6:06 PM, Kenendcindyc said:

    Hmmmm strange place to break, typically that’s not a highly stressed location. I’d agree maybe fractured from the impact you mentioned. 

     

    That's the exact place where the axle broke in my 1929 Dodge Brothers. It happened without any fanfare or warning. I was driving about 20 mph less than a block away from a car show, stopped at a stop sign and then nothing. No movement or sound other than the engine.  You might expect that snapping a hunk of steel over 1 inch in diameter would create some excitement.  AAA to the rescue.

    • Like 1
  3. I have an issue with a 1929 NE Speedometer wherein the odometer numbers want to rotate as a group. This doesn't happen all the time, but it is interesting to watch as it happens. I haven't dissected it yet, but does anyone have any guesses as to why this might happen and how to repair it? 

     

    RichBad's disassembly of a nearly identical unit seen here might hold the clue:

     

  4. On 7/14/2021 at 8:29 AM, Tom Laferriere said:

    I am in love with this car.  I don't know why though.  

    Hi Tom!

    What's not to love?  All 222.5 inches of her. Over 18 1/2 feet! It's hard to believe it's almost 50yrs. old. My Dad was a die-hard Mercury guy. He bought a brand new triple black 1971 Mercury Marquis as his first mid-life crisis car. He was in the midst of a mid-eighty crisis when he purchased this one.

    Thanks for the comment!

    Joe

  5. 5 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

    Was this car for sale a year or more ago in the

    AACA magazine, Antique Automobile?  There was

    an identical or nearly identical car, a yellow 1973 Mercury

    Marquis coupe.  I like the Marquis styling, especially in

    1973 and 1974.

    Hi John-

    The last time this car was offered for sale was when my Dad purchased it from the original owner in 2014.  A Mercury aficionado who owns two 1973's contacted me because this color combination is fairly rare. He was the one who did the research and found only 150 out of 22,000 two-door coupes are still registered in the US. He also mentioned only one in three were originally delivered with the 460CID option, so that number could be less than 150. He never told me the production figures for this color.

     

    Perhaps you saw this car featured in a full color spread in the October 2015 issue of Collectible Automobile Magazine.  Coincidentally, someone on eBay has a copy of this issue for sale featuring this Marquis. Here's the link: https://www.ebay.com/itm/265220083795?hash=item3dc0595053:g:kmwAAOSw8ddglyM~

    Joe 

  6. Here is an excellent example of a Luxurious 1973 Mercury Grand Marquis Brougham. My Dad purchased the car from the original owner about 7 years ago. This car is completely original as it came from the factory in 1973. It has only 38,000 miles and is in excellent condition. It has always been garaged. Rare Find! They only sold 22,000 of this body style and this car is one of only 150 left registered in the US!

    The vehicle is big and drives like a dream. It is powered by the rare optional 460 CID -V8 with the optional 4 Bbl carburetor. The engine is paired with a 3 speed automatic transmission and shifts as smooth as glass. It functions perfectly as it should. These are highly reliable transmissions and are very low maintenance.

    The vehicle has been meticulously maintained and handles well. Its road manners are impeccable. The power steering and power brakes work flawlessly. The engine and transmission combination provides super smooth acceleration and power. The engine starts easily- it runs and idles smoothly. It doesn’t smoke or use oil. The engine runs cool as a cucumber even on a hot San Diego day.

    This beauty is fully equipped with all factory options including air conditioning (nice and cold), climate control, trademark Hidden Headlights, 6-way power seats, power windows, cruise control, power steering, power disc brakes, AM-FM tape. An aftermarket CD player in the trunk and aftermarket back up camera is also included.

    It has beautiful, flawless white factory pillowed upholstery on the power seats and door panels. The white headliner is perfect, as is the contrasting dark green carpet. The glass is perfect and chip-free. All power windows and power seats function as they should. The dark green vinyl top is spectacular. The body is solid and rust-free. The doors shut like vault doors. The factory fender skirts are a handsome treat.

    The brilliant chrome bumpers and trim is all in perfect condition with no rust or pitting. The paint is original and is in excellent condition except a few small paint chips, which is normal for an original paint job that is nearly 50 years old.

    The dash cluster gauges, including the oil pressure, temp, ammeter, fuel, speedometer, and odometer work perfectly. The CLOCK even works, keeping accurate time.The odometer reads 38,652 ORIGINAL miles and has not been tripped over.

    The Whitewall Tires have plenty of tread on them and really set off a luxury look. The brakes and lights are all functioning as they should. In fact, this one has a special feature: SEQUENTIAL TURN SIGNAL LIGHTS!

    The trunk is absolutely huge and contains the spare tire and the factory tools. In fact, the factory spare tire has never been mounted with the factory markings still on it. The factory original jack and handle are included. All factory labels under the hood, the trunk and door jams are present and in perfect order.

    The car has been on display twice at the San Diego Auto Museum and was featured on the local news station KUSI-TV. It has won numerous trophies and awards including a Grand National Prize Winner Award from the Antique Automobile Club of America (SEE PHOTOS). All of its many trophies will be included with the sale.

    All in all, this vehicle is ready for show or go. It needs nothing. The car is a head-turner. It has a commanding road presence-you will be amazed at all the attention it gets. That’s why the San Diego Auto Museum has hosted it twice!

    The vehicle is currently registered and located in San Diego, California.  I have a clear title in hand.

    Call or text SIX one nine 8 FIVE one 5 nine SIX zero

    1973 MERCURY MARQUIS EXT FRONT CRAIGSLIST AD DSCN0798.JPG

    1973 MERCURY MARQUIS EXT FR HOOD ORN CRAIGSLIST AD DSCN0843.JPG

    1973 MERCURY MARQUIS EXT FR LT CRAIGSLIST AD DSCN0829.JPG

    1973 MERCURY MARQUIS EXT FR RT CRAIGSLIST AD DSCN0831.JPG

     

    1973 MERCURY MARQUIS EXT LT SIDE CRAIGSLIST AD DSCN0828.JPG

    1973 MERCURY MARQUIS EXT REAR RT CRAIGSLIST AD DSCN0835.JPG

    1973 MERCURY MARQUIS EXT REAR TOP CRAIGSLIST AD DSCN0849.JPG

    1973 MERCURY MARQUIS EXT REAR TRUNK CRAIGSLIST AD DSCN0811.JPG

    1973 MERCURY MARQUIS EXT SIDE LOGO CRAIGSLIST AD DSCN0812.JPG

    1973 MERCURY MARQUIS INT FRONT CRAIGSLIST AD DSCN0794.JPG

    1973 MERCURY MARQUIS INT HEADLINER CRAIGSLIST AD DSCN0805.JPG

    1973 MERCURY MARQUIS INT REAR CRAIGSLIST AD DSCN0793.JPG

    1973 MERCURY MARQUIS INT SEAT CRAIGSLIST AD DSCN0804.JPG

    1973 MERCURY MARQUIS MUSEUM CRAIGSLIST AD 1.jpg

    1973 MERCURY MARQUIS MUSEUM CRAIGSLIST AD DSCN0848.JPG

    1973 MERCURY MARQUIS TRUNK TIRE CRAIGSLIST AD DSCN0846.JPG

    1973 MERCURY MARQUIS ENGINE FR CRAIGSLIST AD DSCN0839.JPG

    1973 MERCURY MARQUIS ENGINE AIR CLEANER CRAIGSLIST AD DSCN0838.JPG

    1973 MERCURY MARQUIS INT DASH CRAIGSLIST AD DSCN0851.JPG

    1973 MERCURY MARQUIS MUSEUM AWARD CRAIGSLIST AD DSCN0844.JPG

    1973 MERCURY MARQUIS INT DASH CRAIGSLIST AD DSCN0796.JPG

    1973_mercury_marquis_brougham_4 (1).jpg

  7. JD - Quick question on a Model A truck vs. a Fordor with respect to "creature comforts."  My Dad is 90yrs old and drives the heck out of his '31 Town Sedan. Getting in and out is somewhat challenging due to the relatively narrow gap between the seat and the side panel. (The seat is in its rear most position).  Is there any difference with a truck?

  8. John-

    You are worth a hell of a lot more than the price of this truck. Your wealth of knowledge and generosity is absolutely amazing. I am grateful to have become friends with you and Cherrie over the years. It is always such a hoot when we get together.  You two are the best! 

     

    I am always impressed with the support everyone on this forum gives. That was an extra special move making that offer to John. It couldn't go to a better recipient.

    • Like 2
    • Thanks 2
  9. Not far from me there is an auto repair shop that caters to older cars from the 40’s to the 70’s. Whenever I pass this place, it is always fun to see what’s sitting on the lot. Last week, I decided it was a good time to take advantage of the “no- traffic” pandemic situation and take one of my old cars for a spin. As I drove past the repair shop, I noticed something was amiss. Apparently there was a catastrophic land slide on the business just adjacent to the shop. The landslide collapsed one entire side of the repair shop’s lot, flattening a bunch of the old cars into automotive pancakes.

     

    Two amazing things about this: (1) thankfully no one was injured and (2) not one word was mentioned about this on the local news.

     

    If this happened three months ago, Fox News would have been all over this; but the story was not even on their radar!  They are too busy reporting about the end of the world if you don’t wear your face mask.

    1770182562_LANDSLIDEONOLDCARS001.thumb.JPG.b840cabc0e8b83ebebabd146c6efd905.JPG356533640_LANDSLIDEONOLDCARS002.thumb.JPG.b8519579aa1fc3aa09ce000a0c1986c3.JPG1485757913_LANDSLIDEONOLDCARS003.thumb.JPG.4bd75986f485683339938b06d95f42fa.JPG93358975_LANDSLIDEONOLDCARS004.thumb.JPG.a3b741ddfd8c0365c44a830104db06f1.JPG401696049_LANDSLIDEONOLDCARS005.thumb.JPG.18ba4b80772fa3167c40f9b178f6d505.JPG1182842863_LANDSLIDEONOLDCARS006.thumb.JPG.5d29c26257224226454e46e054a8cad9.JPG1150836450_LANDSLIDEONOLDCARS007.thumb.JPG.2c90afaf3d4093aed7b8a52f23d9ab5d.JPG2037627172_LANDSLIDEONOLDCARS008.thumb.JPG.d6b784b63182e0b51f0899f2829c3f53.JPG485822357_LANDSLIDEONOLDCARS009.thumb.JPG.38a02ead36d00c6047114155661d96dc.JPG2109938738_LANDSLIDEONOLDCARS010.thumb.JPG.40d19d9bc4f1e6ccbf2694a78ca0708f.JPG1610131643_LANDSLIDEONOLDCARS011.thumb.JPG.0cf2c2aa15311654e884f7b06e1997e4.JPG1733369349_LANDSLIDEONOLDCARS012.thumb.JPG.cc8c028e1fb25f794ea95f315aed0452.JPG

    • Like 1
  10. I have this mystery (to me) item hanging in my garage and can't figure out what it is. I have a few ideas what it could be used for (Whomper, Billy-club, attitude adjuster) but I am pretty sure it has another purpose. That is where you, the AACA experts, come in. 

     

    The item you see in the pictures is essentially a 36" long pipe made of 3 individual sections of aluminum tubing or pipe threaded together. The OD is 1 inch. On one end there is a small threaded cap about a 1 ¼”  long. The threaded cap has a small hole drilled in it's the end so it is not meant to be water or air tight.

     

    The main body or center portion is about 30" long with male threads on one end and female threads on the other. 

    The third section is about 5" long. The 5" section has 4 small holes cross drilled near it's the end. I threaded a zip-tie through two of the holes in order to hang the pipe up. The 5" section is filled with about 30 steel rods maybe 3/16" diameter. One end of the rod bundle is captured inside the 5" section of tubing with two set screws.  On the opposite end, the steel rods are left unbound and flap in the breeze. 

     

    There is a number (T91001393) stamped on one end. I have Googled that number many times with no joy. I also submitted the images for a Google reverse image search. No luck there, either. There are no other markings, trademarks, logos or numbers anywhere. 

    The only thing that even remotely comes to mind is a very short oxygen lance or "burning bar". Most oxygen lances have a bunch of small rods packed inside of a larger rod and are usually about 10 feet long. Lances also have a pipe thread on one end to hook up to your oxygen tank and valve. I suspect this is not a lance.  Anybody want to guess?

    MYSTERY TOOL 012.JPG

    MYSTERY TOOL 013.JPG

    MYSTERY TOOL 011.JPG

    MYSTERY TOOL 010.JPG

  11. Hi Peter Pan- 

    We shopped around a little, but no one else had the answers like the Brassworks did. (BTW No relation here , just a satisfied consumer). The staff were very knowledgeable and familiar with this honeycomb style radiator.

     

    We sent the original radiator to them so they could strip off all the soldered bits and the tanks.  Afterwards they even returned the old core to us.

     

    The downside: You can't be in a hurry.  We were told there were 27 jobs ahead of us!  The ETA was approximately 3 months.  They beat their own time frame- it was on our doorstep in two months.  It was well worth the wait. The radiator is a work of art! The price... about $3100.00 USD including tax and shipping.   

     

    -Joe

    • Like 2
  12.  

    Dave, on behalf of all the blind idiots of the world, we’ll give you 10% credit for your suggestion that the lying media, for appearance sake, “doctored” the image of the one and only “real” marathon car.  Next, you'll be saying there is only one Santa Claus.

     

    Why 10% credit?

     

    After closer scrutiny, there may be a faint ghost image of the original graphics seen below Dodge 8. Or maybe it’s just my imagination. Photoshop does go way back; then they called it “Photo Retouching.”

     

    Now on to the other 90% of the argument…

     

    1) Why do practically all the other pictures depict a very "dirty" Marathon car?  

    2) Why take the time to Photoshop the image to make the car look "cleaner"? 

    3) Doesn’t it make more sense to keep the car appear like it has been ridden hard and put away wet?

    4) Why bother with photo-doctoring when a CAR WASH would take one-fourth the time?

    5) If they wanted to “clean-up” the car, why bother adding in pinstripes that the “real” car didn’t have?

    6) Why would Dodge approve of a “doctored” photo if it might hint at the possibility that more than ONE “real” marathon car exists?

     

    Dave, we welcome your scholarly and insightful answers the above questions. Chop-chop! It is not nice to keep a blind idiot waiting.

     

  13. On 5/30/2019 at 10:56 PM, 35cz8 said:

    There was only the one actual Marathon Car and as can be seen in the photo - the differences are very clear.  No side mount spares and a different paint pattern.... 

     

    Hate to be a big skeptic of this interesting thread, but take a close look at the photos of the "real" marathon car at various mileages.  Let's examine the graphics on the passenger side of the "real" car with 25,000 miles. Now look at 65K miles and 75K miles. All the same , right? 

     

    Now , look at the graphics on the "real" car at 50,000 miles. Not only are the graphics not the same, but in the 50K picture, there is a white painted stripe around the windshield. There is also a white "trim" at the bottom of each of the side windows on the 50K picture which disappears in the other photos. So I am going to say "quack" on "only one real marathon car." (Sidemounts are present in all the "real" car pics, so this isn't a picture of a "dealer's" car.)

    Dodge 5 b.jpg

     

    Dodge 8 Marathon Car at 25K miles Pass Side_KnoxvilleCityHall.jpg

    Dodge 8 Marathon Car at 65K miles Pass Side.jpg

    Dodge 8 Marathon Car at 75K miles Pass Side.jpg

    Dodge 8 Marathon Car at 50K miles Pass Side lettering changed and white stripe around windshield and bottom of side windows.jpg

    • Like 1
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