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vintchry

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Everything posted by vintchry

  1. Want to find information on 1928 Chrysler 62, both the standard production autos and the commercial chassis that were available in 1928. I have the 24-33 master parts catalog, but no owners manuals, sales literature etc. Thanks. Rob
  2. The radiator looks more Oldsmobile to me. Paige did not use as rounded a radiator as this appears to be. Also the rear hubcap is larger than the front hubcap-or is the photo distorted? The sidemounts on a Paige use the rim only even with the disc wheels, this appears to have a complete wheel in place. Strange looking door handles too! Rob
  3. I believe those are called a heavy hex nut. Check in McMaster Carr for replacements.
  4. Bob, Well then what is available? Dash, gauges, engine accessories? Let me know, thanks for the info, sorry you got there too late, the car didn't look that bad to us Easterners. Rob
  5. Bob, Are you planning on letting the whole piece go or do you want to part out? Recently bought a 26 E80 and am looking for extras. Where are you located? Rob Burchill
  6. Try Tom Hannaford at Antique Auto Parts Cellar, he has fresh gaskets die cut and most seals you will need. Also check in the WPC newsletter as there is someone making rear wheel seals for these cars. Rob
  7. Tom Hannaford at Antique Auto Parts Cellar does a fine job on rebuilding water pumps, I have had several done and am pleased. Turn around has been good also. Saw an add for a shop in CA that rebuilds with new seals for a non leaking waterpump, haven't tried it yet-any body out there who has? Rob
  8. The Ford guys have made a steel line that is copper plated, look at any of the major Ford restoration suppliers. Their lines were also originally copper 1939-41. I was able to get copper washers at the local NAPA dealer, one still has to be careful when tightening to get a secure and leakfree coupling. Be real careful on the antisieze applications so not to get any material in the line itself.
  9. The Ford guys have made a steel line that is copper plated, look at any of the major Ford restoration suppliers. Their lines were also originally copper 1939-41. I was able to get copper washers at the local NAPA dealer, one still has to be careful when tightening to get a secure and leakfree coupling. Be real careful on the antisieze applications so not to get any material in the line itself.
  10. Bob, If you want a 33 Chrysler 8 engine and transmission, we have available a 33 CT (Royal Eight) 4dr for sale. Vehicle is very complete but in need of a frame up restoration. THe car has not been parted or disassembled. Has the wire wheels and rear spare with cover. Not rusted out but very surface rusty. If interested contact me. Rob Burchill Frederick, MD
  11. Why does this piece look like one from a 1929 Hudson or Essex? My knowledge of the 30 Dodges is weak, but my Chryslers do not use anything this fancy or intricate. Do your other handles match this pattern? Rob Burchill
  12. Check with Tom Hannaford, Antique Auto Parts Cellar. He makes the fuel pump kits, they are excellent and work well with today's fuels. He will need the stamped number on the mounting flange of the fuel pump. Rob Burchill
  13. Mike, I have had great success with Tom Hannaford at Antique Parts Cellar, in So. Weymouth, MA. He does both the water pump rebuild and will re-mould your motor mount. I can not answer your query about the timing plug on your car. On a 30 CJ it is steel, on a 31 3rd series CD* it is steel. Rob
  14. The biggest problems with 6 volt systems are that people use battery cables that are too small in size (I like 2/0 cable) and that the connections are corroded or dirty. Poor ground affects light brightness. Would suggest fixing the issues at hand rather than masking them with an 8 volt battery.
  15. Looking for either some patterns or copies of original trunk cardboard and trunk mat for a 1954 Chrysler New Yorker 2dr. From my research it appears the mat is the same for any 54 Chrysler, and the cardboard trim appears to have the same part numbers. Anybody willing to copy their units or perhaps replaced theirs and still have old ones floating around? I'm in Central Maryland.
  16. BS Wisnewewski in Milwaukee used to have rubber floor mats that looked very good in application. The mats were of poor quality rubber and did not like to be removed once installed. Also the slits one cut into the mat needed to have punched round holes at each end of the slit or the mat would continue to tear. These mats even came with a jute mat backing. I have a couple in reserve for our cars but no extras at this point. I would be willing to make a mat available for a good copy if none are left available.
  17. Is this car still available? Can you forward pictures and details to my email? robburchill@comcast.net
  18. May have a rear bumper, do you need a split type (used with rear mounted spare) or full type? I believe the 77 uses 18" wheels, the 17's came into play on the late CD* vehicles in 1931.
  19. Contact me at my e-mail: robburchill@comcast.net Will give you my phone and address then.
  20. What other items are you looking for on the 33 8cylinder. I do presume you are needing parts for a CT or CQ? am in central MD
  21. Would some 1931 Plymouth pieces be of interest? I have a front axle and springs, rear axle, wheels and rims, steering gear. Central MD area.
  22. If you need to remove a rear wooden wheel, and do not have a puller, remove the axle nut on the wheel you wish to remove, jack the car up on the opposite side so the weight transfers to the wheel you wish to remove, use a brass drift on the axle shaft end (at the threads) and with a hand sledge hit the brass drift. If you are lucky, the wheel will jar itself loose and you can remove it. Sometimes it will take considerable time to persuade the wheel to come off. If you have time, spray a rust penetrant like PB blaster or Kroil at the hub end and allow the penetrant to creep up the tapered shaft as much as possible. Many different types of pullers were available originally, some threaded onto the hub of the wheel, clamped in place, and had a bolt threaded into the middle that pushed against the axle shaft end, one would thread in the bolt until there was tension, hit the head of the bolt with a hammer and persuade the forementioned wheel off. Another style threaded onto the axle shaft using the axle nut threads and would bottom out against the end of the axle shaft, using the first mentioned system of weight transfer the remover would be struck with a hammer and hopefully would allow the wheel to jar itself loose again. This is a safer system as you don't have to hold the drift. Just make sure you protect the threads any way you choose to remove the wheel.
  23. Looks like a horn button for a 1937 Chrysler, probably 6 cylinder
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