Tom Martinez

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Everything posted by Tom Martinez

  1. Commodore, thanks for the reply, the part number SKF 6305-2RSJ you reference seems to have a 2.440 OD x .9843 ID, which does seem large, my cross refernce for the pilot is SKF-6204, which is 1.850 OD x .787 ID, this is more likely, though pretty big, this is a big car with a big input shaft. The question is what is the release bearing #? Any and all advice appreciated, - -Tom
  2. I'm looking for a source for the clutch release and pilot bearing for a 1931 Lincoln K, The old Chiltons interchange manual has only the pilot part number but no number listed for the release bearing. I don't have the old parts to reference yet because I wanted to have the new ones on hand before I took everything apart. I've got calls into a couple of Lincoln club members but thought I would ask here too. So who is the go-to guy that knows all the applications for ball bearings? Blue Skies and soft landngs --Tom
  3. No, It's a 1931 Lincoln DCP, but it's just as big and powerful.
  4. Hi Scott, I think your in a buyers market for the type of truck you need, so I'd be picky if you have the time. Regarding your trailer requirement, I'd measure the height of the car with the top erected because it would be nice to get a trailer that has extra height. I'd also like to mention that for a 15' car you should get at least a 20' trailer, you'll need the room to get in and tie down, it also makes loading and unloading much easier. You'll also be surprised at how many times you need to use the space for tools, parts, tires, etc. All these reasons drove me to the 24' I now have for my big Classics, the 18.5' I had just didn't cut it anymore in all dimensions and capacities. I understand your inclination to get a minimum sized trailer for your new car but think about getting something that can accept a larger (Packard?) car if need be, plus, a bigger trailer when parked makes a good extra garage. You'll hardly notice the difference between towing an 18' or 24' trailer but you'll sure notice the day you need more room. I wish I had thought this way when I bought my first trailer, then I wouldn't have needed to buy my second. Best Regards, --Tom in Ca.
  5. Thanks for the responses guys, job done, I just did a test drive all looks well. I'm torqued down right now at 55 ftlbs, I think after reading Chrises post I'll go around one more time at 65. The reason I changed the heads on my Limo (not the green roadster in the picture) was because the heads that came with the car were cracked and poorly welded, cosmetic wise they looked like S**T, so I replaced them with a nice reconditioned set. Regards, Tom in Ca.
  6. I need to remove the heads on a 1931 Lincoln 385 flathead V8. There isn't really a proper shop manual available for these for these engines and all the documents and manuals I have, do not give a head torque value or the torque pattern. It's a 23 stud head. Is this information hiding somwhere out there? Does anyone have any general rules for torquing a big flathead like this? Any assitance or guidance is appreciated Tom In Ca.
  7. I aquired a used 3 axle 24" TPD last year and couldn't be happier, I've noticed very little extra scuffing compared to a 2 axle trailer. I can say that it pulls very stable and solid, better in cross winds too. I like it so much that even though I bought it to haul a big pre-war classic I just decided to use it to pick up a little foreign job that weighs half as much just because it feels safer and handles better than my 18" 2 axle. The round trip is 6,000 miles, but it's worth the safty factory alone. Regards, --Tom
  8. Tom Martinez

    Lincoln?

    On second thought it could be a 1931 that has been changed by the coachbuilder because you can still see the lug nuts on the wheels which were still uncovered in 1931, but the lack of cowl lights plus the fender lights say 1932
  9. Tom Martinez

    Lincoln?

    This is a 1932 KB Lincoln Chassis, V12, 145" WB. The coachwork does appear to be European. --Tom
  10. The 146" Chryslers were probably done for one-upsmanship over Packard, Lincoln and the Cadillac V16, which I believe was also on a 145" WB...mine's longer than than yours! Now that I've owned the two Lincolns for a few years anything much shorter looks stubby to me! --Tom in So. Cal.....still sorting and tuning
  11. All the 1932-1934 KB's were on this same long chassis, there were at least a few thousand total for those years. These are of two projects I'm simultaneously working on, one is a Limo the other a Lebaron Roadster. The long WB does wonders for the styling
  12. "Repeal" plates can always be found on ePrey, that's where I got mine. Blue skies--Tom
  13. Excellent! I have two cars that I wish would appreciate, every little bit counts, but I've got a long way to go before they are worth more than what I've got in them. Tom in California
  14. Attached are some more photo's of my 1931 Lincoln Limo, I drove her around for the first time, it went pretty well so I put the hood back on, it's aluminum so one person can do it. I also finished off the running boards and installed the headlights.<O:p</O:p <O:p</O:p of course the hood is aluminum but so is the entire body skin. Amazingly the A, B, and C pillars are heavy structural aluminum backed up with wood...damned impressive, no wonder so many of the big classics got turned into B-24's and Mustangs, the car also has a massive aluminum crankcase and many bronze fittings throughout, these cars must have been a scrappers dream. <O:p</O:p I had a heck of a time with the electric fuel pump that the <ST1:pPO</ST1:p installed, it wasn't pumping so I just bypassed it and the regular pump did just fine so I hope to permanently ditch it.<O:p</O:p <O:p</O:p The car seems to be geared relatively high so I can tell it will be a good highway car. <O:p</O:p <O:p</O:p So now a bit more tinkering then off to my shop to paint the hood and touch up a few spots
  15. A few progress photos of the Limo, since my last post I've attached the running boards and new rubber mats. I attached the radiator shell. I assembled and mounted the side mounts. I received my rebuilt shutter-stat and reassembled the radiator shutter mechanism...quite a Rube Goldberg set up but it looks pretty robust. I partially disassembled and cleaned the carburetor, and then I replaced the float needle and some seals and gaskets. <O:p</O:p <O:p</O:p My photo's show my oil pan and filter screen ready go in after de-sludging. I also got a good look for the first time at the bottom end of a Fork And Blade engine...wow! pretty impressive, the rods are foot long and are machined from billet, damned impressive. This is what you got in 1931 when you paid literally more than 10 times the price of a Model A. The only thing I need to do before start it after sitting for 6 months is to drain the gas tank and replace with fresh gas. <O:p</O:p <O:p</O:p Perhaps someone can comment about the oil I should use, since the car has roller tappets and not flat tappets, I believe I can get away without using any special oil or adding supplements. Regards from Ca, Tom<O:p</O:p
  16. No my car is not the car on Pawn Stars, I saw that episode and the car was a 1932 LeBaron KB 12 cylinder, the color scheme was similar. I believe the pawn shop paid the fellow in gold, $95k I believe, which was a total bargain for a LeBaron KB, the seller could have easily done much better, then gone out and bought his own gold...of course he wouldn't have been on the TV show either....sort of like the BJ auction mentality? Tom in SoCal
  17. I'm hoping someone recognizes the type of wheel nuts I need and can give me a lead to where I can find replacements. They are for a 1931 Lincoln model K, probably typical to 1932-1933 KA and KB also. Perhaps other cars used the same type? The seat cone is about 45 degrees and 1.100" in diameter, the thread looks like 3/4-16, the overall length is 1.04" and the hex is .85" I'm looking for at least (30) new ones and I'd rather not visit the machine shop. Thanks and regards from So. Cal.
  18. Basil97, I've sent you a private message with my current contact info, lets talk.
  19. The original color this car was painted per the Lincoln records was "MM" which translates into Mulberry Maroon. I can't say what the paint number is or what the current color actualy is because I didn't comission the work but it seems to be in the spirit of the Limousine pictured in the big glossy sales brochure. It's a very nice period color for a thirties era car, particularly a sedan or a closed car. Regards, Tom
  20. Here are a few pictures of another 31 Lincoln K, this one followed me home late last year, It's a very early Lincoln bodied Limousine, 145" W.B. Now that the 31 Lebaron Roadster is at my shop to get a little body work and paint touch-up, I brought this big gal home to do final assembly and sorting. I bought this car from the heirs of a fellow who passed away while coming home from the upholstery shop to check on the car. The poor guy was about 95% done, chrome, paint upholstery, etc. It's been a great help to have this car as well as the Roadster as they both came with spares that have been beneficial to each other, not to mention I can compare parts and the correct way everything goes together. Anybody know where I can get a shutter thermostat? I think they were common to K's, KB's and KA's. The one I have looks right but doesn't have enough travel, maybe it needs to be repaired? but it also has early "L" part numbers on it that could be correct too because it's a very early car, # 179. Regards from Tom in Ca.
  21. The belts were already on the car when I bought it, but I also got some old spares, they are old and fraying, they came in NAPA sleeves that were hand marked in pencil by the previous owner (deceased) as Generator and Fan Fan P/N 28346, Generator, 22363 I can not tell you if these part numbers are good, but at least it's a good lead. Tom in Ca.
  22. Attached are photos my project, a 1931 Lincoln Lebaron convertible roadster. Check out the 145" WB and the nicely raked windshield. I almost want to leave the hood off permanently just to stare at the engine. I started the engine for the first time this afternoon, man what a sweetheart! I also drove the car for the first time, quite an experience. It's relatively easy to handle excepting the huge turning circle. The radiator shutters opened, the oil preassure was good, water temp good, clutches and shift well. At first I thought it had a power problem, then I remembered the spark advance lever, then whoosh! now good power. The car is nearly ready for upholstery after many hours of sorting the doors and the very complex top frame. I have nicknamed this car the Catalog Car because it was originaly painted this way at the factory, they were non-standard colors, exactly matching the sales catalog. Tom in Cal.<!-- google_ad_section_end -->
  23. Wellens, Thanks for the diagram too, I have one but your is better.
  24. Thanks Steve, I guess that answers that about the accelerator pump, I figured as such, thanks. Attached are photos of the subject vehicle, a 1931 Lincoln Lebaron convertible roadster. Check out the 145" WB and the nicely raked windshield. I almost want to leave the hood off permanently just to stare at the engine. I started the engine for the first time this afternoon, man what a sweetheart! I also drove the car for the first time, quite an experience. It's relatively easy to handle excepting the huge turning circle. The radiator shutters opened, the oil preassure was good, water temp good. At first I thought it had a power problem, then I remembered the spark advance lever, then whoosh! now good power. The car is nearly ready for upholstery after many hours of sorting the doors and the very complex top frame. Tom in Cal.
  25. I removed the top covers on a Stromberg DD-3 to clean and inspect the bowl, float and needle. It appears to me there is no direct mechanical connection between the throttle shaft and the accelerator pump mechanism. <O:p</O:p I am curious how the pump is activated. I'm only familiar with the type of accelerator pump that is activated directly from the throttle shaft, squirting gas when the throttle is snapped open. Can someone please enlighten me? This carburetor is used on Lincolns, 1931-1933, V8 and V12, perhaps other cars as well. Maybe other Stromberg carbs used this design also. <O:p</O:p <O:p</O:p Thanks, Tom in California<ST1:p</ST1:p<O:p</O:p