VillaRiviera

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About VillaRiviera

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    jeff@pistonpalace.com

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  • Gender:
    Male
  • Location:
    Rhode Island
  • Interests:
    custom cars, hot rods, car styling, car dealership histories, automobilia

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  1. I have a friend who would like to install 1965 Riviera seat covers on his 1964 Riviera seat frames. The '64 Riviera has its original seats. Are there any differences in the seat frames, or do the '65 buns and covers fit the 1964 seat frames without modifications? Thank you!
  2. Here are some my favorite options, not mentioned above... Reverb Purse hook Vacuum trunk release Cornering lights Rear seat arm rest Dinsmore compass, (the angular one). Turbine wheels Rear window defroster
  3. I'm wondering if anyone has installed a 4-speed in their 1st generation Riviera's? Could this be done with minimal fabricating and some off the shelf GM parts? Some friends were pondering how the Riviera's popularity would have faired (then and now) if the Riviera was offered a 4-speed option - better, worse, the same? There was also a general agreement that the Riviera is relatively undervalued compared to muscle cars of the era. Considering Riviera's were produced on limited quantities, (40,000 vs. 75,000 GTO's in '65), had gorgeous styling, "big block" engines, bucket seats and most were produced loaded with options, shouldn't a '65 Riviera be worth more then a similar condition '65 GTO? Could the only reason their worth less (Hagerty, NADA Classic Car price guides) is that the Riviera wasn't originally offered with a 4-speed?
  4. Pete, I've not had any passengers ride in the backseat to confirm the wind situation. But, in the recent Review on page 16 there's a small photo of James Darren and Pamela Tiffen in the back seat of the Villa Riviera, Pamela doesn't look too happy and I'd bet the reason could be wind messed up her hair! That photo was taken on the way to a movie theatre as Barris coordinated driving the stars to movie theatres opening nights to meet fans and sign autographs with the Villa Riviera parked in front of the theatre. Imagine the thrill of seeing the movie, meeting the stars and then seeing the car parked in front of the theatre! There is a removable top with the car and it fits quite snuggly it was made from the original roof section. Pins were welded to secure the rear section under the stainless valence. In front, the top is held down with convertible top type latches. Thanks to everyone for the comments and kind words and especially to Ray for assigning space in the Review to describe the car and share it's history with the ROA. Jeff, #10013
  5. I'm 6'-5" and I've had some experience moving seats back in my cars. I like both front seats to match, so here's what I did to gain 3" of leg room in my Riviera. I bought a piece of 1/8" thick x 4" wide x 28" long piece of plain carbon steel at my local hardware store and cut it into 7-pieces each 4" x 4" long. Using the original front clips as a template, I drilled two 5/16" clearance holes 1/2" from the front edge on four of the pieces. Then using the first two holes as reference points, I clamped and welded the front clips 3" back (center hole to center hole) from the opposite edge. These four pieces are the front extensions. Next, I took two 4" x 4" plates and using the rear outer seat track section (the one with TWO holes) as a template and I drilled two 5/16" clearance holes 1/2" from one edge. Then, measuring 3" back drilled two more 5/16" clearance holes on the opposite edge and welded two 5/16"-18 nuts over the two rear holes. These two pieces are the rear-outer extensions. Finally, take the last 4" x 4" piece and in half, so you have two 2" x 4" pieces. Using the rear seat inner track section (the part with ONE hole) as a template drill a 5/16" clearance hole 1/2" from the edge. Then, measuring 3" back drill another 5/16" clearance hole on the opposite edge and weld a 5/16"-18 nuts over the rear hole. These will serve as the rear-inner extensions, you may need to cut a notch from one side so these pieces lay flat. Using the original (or new) seat bolts, bolt your new extension plates to the floor, then mount your seat on the extension plates and enjoy your Riviera with ample leg room.
  6. Erik, Happy I could help, good luck with the project! Jeff
  7. This is a great topic, I too would love to see pictures of original '63 Riviera with A/C fuel lines. Some questions I still have... After the fuel pump, did the original fuel lines include any metal pipes or were they all rubber hoses? Were the original hoses (assuming all rubber) routed through the Alternator/AC bracket front in theory to keep them from the belts? Was the original filter bracket attached to the water outlet with two bolts and did the bracket include a long screw to tighten the filter? Was the original filter installed with the inlet and outlet hoses absolutely vertical or at an angle? Was the original filter bracket painted engine color, or was it installed afterwards and not painted or painted a different color? Thanks in advance for any answers, Jeff
  8. Eric, Try loosening the steering column bolts, if you lower it and all the instrument panel screws are removed the panel will come out easily. Jeff
  9. If it's not too much trouble, I'd love to see a photo of that "canceling pin" with the twist, is this a Riviera-only part?
  10. Pete, I'm 6'-5" and I've had some experience moving seats back in my cars. I like both front seats to match, so here's what I did to gain 3" of leg room in my Riviera. I bought a piece of 1/8" thick x 4" wide x 28" long piece of plain carbon steel at my local hardware store and cut it into 7-pieces each 4" x 4" long. Using the original front clips as a template, I drilled two 5/16" clearance holes 1/2" from the front edge on four of the pieces. Then using the first two holes as reference points, I clamped and welded the front clips 3" back (center hole to center hole) from the opposite edge. These four pieces are the front extensions. Next, I took two 4" x 4" plates and using the rear outer seat track section (the one with TWO holes) as a template and I drilled two 5/16" clearance holes 1/2" from one edge. Then, measuring 3" back drilled two more 5/16" clearance holes on the opposite edge and welded two 5/16"-18 nuts over the two rear holes. These two pieces are the rear-outer extensions. Finally, take the last 4" x 4" piece and in half, so you have two 2" x 4" pieces. Using the rear seat inner track section (the part with ONE hole) as a template drill a 5/16" clearance hole 1/2" from the edge. Then, measuring 3" back drill another 5/16" clearance hole on the opposite edge and weld a 5/16"-18 nuts over the rear hole. These will serve as the rear-inner extensions, you may need to cut a notch from one side so these pieces lay flat. Using the original (or new) seat bolts, bolt your new extension plates to the floor, then mount your seat on the extension plates and enjoy your Riviera with ample leg room.
  11. Thank you 64Rivvy, That is very close, but too bog, my fire wall opening is 1-5/8" x 1" tall, the one Steel has is the right shape, but much bigger. I know it's an unusual part and so fart I've not found another GM cross over part. I may have to get creative and try to make something. Thanks again!
  12. Can someone help me find a source for the oval firewall grommet on a '63 Riviera? This is the smaller grommet on the drivers side it has two holes for wires to pass. The firewall opening is 1-5/8" tall x 1" wide. I have tried Steele Rubber, Cars, Inc. and USA Parts. Thank you!
  13. Bill, I did it on my '63 and '64 Riviera's. You have to be willing to cut the back off the ash tray, then using a piece of flat sheet stock, cut the required shape and spot weld in place. I covered mine with the same veneer used on the doors and console. On the '64, I filled the cigarette lighter hole with a chrome marine dash light that was connected to the factory lighter lamp wiring.
  14. Forgive me for taking liberty with the intent of this posting. But I've shared below some changes I'd wished the Buick engineers and designers had made when the first generation Riviera was introduced. I can think of many, but here's a dozen items I'd wish for if I was buying a new car back then (in no particular order)... 1.) leather seat option on '64 and '65 2.) 425 cu. in engine standard in '63 and '65 3.) three speed automatic standard in all three years 4.) a four speed manual transmission option 5.) move the front seat positions back 3 - 4" 6.) double hinge the center console glove box door, so it lays flat 7.) an antenna that goes all the way down, flush with the fender top 8.) a gas tank fill that isn't so difficult to reach or stick a modern nozzle into 9.) a more robust or reinforced glove box door latch 10.) dash gauges, rather then idiot lights 11.) a more easily serviceable heater core 12.) a '65 nose with a '63 '64 sides and rear. I've made some of these modifications to my '64 Riviera.
  15. Mr. Earl, I have a '63 parts car located in Rhode Island, the drive line is complete, the interior is missing and some trim, but all the parts are negotiable. Jeff