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1928Packard526

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About 1928Packard526

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  • Birthday 05/14/1932

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  1. Bernie — My omission. Restoration Supply Company has two websites, www.restorationstuff.com and info@RestorationStuff.com. Pete P.
  2. Bernie J. — Snubber belting is available from the Restoration Supply Company in Escondido CA. They call it "Snubber Belt" and offer it in 5 widths from 1.25"—2" X 3/16" thick. The belting is only available in dark brown. I have used it on my '28 Packard and it has been quite serviceable. It is not cheap, @ $10-$14 per foot. Should you choose to investigate this source, their phone number is 1-800-306-7008. Pete P.
  3. Dean — I emphatically agree with you about the whine of straight cut gears. It was a familiar sound of my early childhood and is appropriate for all the early cars. I think to "engineer" it away would be to lose some of the authenticity of any restoration of cars of that era. My two cents on highway speeds: Both my cars run happiest in the range of about 45 mph. They both start "breathing hard" at very much over that, but they will do 45 all day long from what I can tell. The car is "happier" at that speed, as is the driver, because emergency braking power becomes less of a concern. Both my '
  4. Dean — Go for the taper! You have already created such a good match to the original you don't want to spoil that by deviating at this point. The taper and the small ridge detail at the escutcheon interface should be an easy thing to do for a person with as much skill as you have shown so far. Small point— Do my eyes deceive me, or is the handle you have made slightly wider than the original, and if that's correct, was that part of your plan? Pete P.
  5. Dean — An absolutely super job. The polished aluminum even seems to be a more than acceptable match in luster to the chrome bumper. What's next? You must now be very close to enjoying all your hard work. Are you going to start over with another car or just relax for awhile? If you choose the latter, I know many of us will miss your informative and exemplary posts. Pete P.
  6. Dean — The bumper badge looks great, and will be really sharp when you have polished it. You do truly amazing work. Might I suggest you clear lacquer the polished piece to keep it looking bright. I have done that on the German silver cowl band I fabricated for the Packard and it looks as good today as when I installed it two years ago. Thanks for the complement on our Packard. It is fun to drive, as I assume your Hupp will be as well, when it is ready for the road. Our Lincoln is closer to work to drive. While the Packard is relatively "light on its feet" you are always aware of just how heav
  7. Chuck — My Lincoln was originally intended as a preservation only effort, as it ran and drove well when I bought it in '82. Unfortunately it had to be kept in our daughter's horse barn in GA for most of the intervening years between then and almost two years ago. Both our last two antique cars, (from when we lived in CA), spent the time in her barn while we sailed in the Caribbean and up the east coast on our liveaboard sailboat. That hiatus was not kind to either vehicle. Our '28 Packard was closer to completely restored so we brought that down to FL first, after we gave up sailing because of
  8. Chuck — I expect you are correct and that Dean will find his own way to repo that badge. It will be as you described and indistinguishable from the original. I imagine there are some others with talents and abilities similar to those of Dean, but none that are as thorough at documenting their progress in pictures as he has been. I know I'll be watching. Dean has also inspired me to do a better job on my project cars, and most important of all, to document the steps as I went along with pictures. From what you say about Dean having material on the way to make a badge sounds like he is planning
  9. Dean — I am flattered that a picture of my Lincoln is even in the same space as your Hupp. I wish you were a bit closer so that I could take advantage of your talent and ideas in helping me restore my cars. Your innovation and skills are extraordinary. I will be watching to see how you approach the reproduction of the bumper badge. I know how I would do it, but you probably have a simpler and more elegant solution in mind. I would make a full-size wooden model of the piece and trot that off to a local foundry to have a brass sand casting made that included the fastening studs that must b
  10. Chuck— One small point I neglected to mention is that your image file must be in the .jpg, or .gif format, I believe. If there are other formats that work I have forgotten them. This would be a good point for one of the thread monitors to jump in and correct my instructions and explain the real skinny on how image posting should be done. I have obviously missed something, but it works for me, (most of the time):-) Pete P.
  11. Chuck — Posting pictures on this thread is easy and a valuable skill to have. Even us twisted users of the MAC can do it. It goes like this: LOG IN GO TO THE QUICK REPLY BOX OF THE THREAD WHERE YOU WISH TO POST ENTER WHATEVER BIT OF TEXT YOU WANT TO GO WITH THE ATTACHMENT THEN — CLICK ON THE "SWITCH TO FULL REPLY SCREEN" CLICK ON UNDERSCORED "FILE MANAGER" COMMAND CLICK ON "BROWSE". IN THE RESULTING WINDOW TO LOCATE YOUR SELECTED IMAGE, (I SUGGEST YOU PLACE IN ON THE DESKTOP BEFORE YOU START THIS PROCEDURE FOR EASE OF LOCATING IT) CLICK ON THE FILE AND THEN THE "ADD" COMMAND. FINALLY CLICK ON
  12. HarryJ — Between you, Dean H., and JFranklin I now know the proper Purolator filter # for my '28 Packard and the correct type connector for that filter. What a great hobby this is when you can get that kind of volunteered help. I have an AC W-16 filter installed on my car right now which appears identical to the Purolator SG-2. After I repaint it and put the proper Purolator decal on it from Osborn Reproductions I don't think anyone will know the difference. It will have been transformed into a Purolator filter for all intent and purposes. Thanks everyone for the assist. Pete P.
  13. Dean — Thank you for your efforts in my behalf. The Franklin type connector appears to be "the one" I'm looking for. You have given me something concrete to chase. As an a long time resident of CA, I am familiar with Pacheco pass. You are serious about testing the ability of the vacuum pump to keep up with the fuel demand under poor vacuum conditions, aren't you? :-) Pete P.
  14. Dean — Thanks for the very good picture of the connector on your Hup. And thanks also to JFranklin for the filter number in his response. I now know a lot more about both the filter used and the proper connector. New knowledge is always a good thing, and it sure helps in finding the correct parts. Here in FL the highest point in the entire state is only some 300 ft above sea level so fuel starvation on hills is hardly a problem, but I did have the car for a number of years while we lived in CA and never had a fuel problem climbing a hill out there. It is conceivable that a long climb could lea
  15. Dean — No apology is called for. I just thought you might have a lead on either the filter # or the actual connector. When I found my filter (NOS) at a swap in CA 35 years ago, I immediately started looking for the proper connector. The fact I had to fabricate a poor substitute so I could use the filter says a lot about my success at finding the part # of the filter or a proper connector. I've been to a lot of swaps over the years with no success and eBay has had nothing to offer so far. If the past pattern holds true, as soon as I do locate the proper connector, and give my first born in exc
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