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palosfv3

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Everything posted by palosfv3

  1. Complete dual carb set up for 41-42 Buick straight eight (248). Will fit 46 - 48 with small 8 . Good shape . No cracks or welds . Carbs will need to be rebuilt . Air filter has minor repairable damage to front carb flange. Heat riser rotates freely. PM for additional info . $775.00 OBO. Does not include shipping or insurance. Prefer pick up if possible. Located SW Chicago Suburbs . palosfv3@earthlink.net seven 08 seven 12 five 187 [ATTACH=CONFIG]261468[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]261469[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]261470[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]261471[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]261472[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]261473[/ATTACH]
  2. Complete dual carb set up for 41-42 Buick straight eight (248). Will fit 46 - 48 with small 8 . Good shape . No cracks or welds . Carbs will need to be rebuilt . Air filter has minor repairable damage to front carb flange. Heat riser rotates freely. PM for additional info . $925.00 OBO. Does not include shipping or insurance. Prefer pick up if possible. Located SW Chicago Suburbs . palosfv3@earthlink.net
  3. Second on the HAMB but the guy with the answer is Rik Hoving . Link to his Custom Car Chronicle . Forum: CCC Forum | Custom Car Chronicle
  4. I have a deep love of old cars especially traditional customs and hot rods . This Buick is not what I would call a custom or a rat rod . Its maybe a parts car at best. I don't mean to be harsh in what I say just realistic . When I see things like the skulls and the flat black paint it tells me the person that is doing the modification is following trends ( which usually go out of style quickly ) and is at the early part of learning about automotive design , engineering and repair . These are the individuals that need our help in learning about the evolution of the automotive industry . Like the old fiddle tunes that were handed down from person to person , the next fiddler has their own interpetation of the old song . I just hope it still stays true to the original melody. .
  5. For the conversation sake . There are very few completed and really well done customs. They take an extraordinary amount of time , planning and money to do right. Customs are one of the most personal car builds that can be done . They reflect the style and personality of the owner and when completed, can be difficult to sell . This Buick is not a well thought out custom . It lacks vision and appears to be something done to kill time in the garage . I don't think the cost of the windshield was the primary reason for the sale . This can be done for $750.00 to $1500.00 depending on if its done by a knowledgeable glass shop or by oneself . I believe he found out how much work and expense is involved . In 2011 the Grand National Roadster Show in LA had an event within the Show named " Customs Then and Now " . This gathering assembled around 75 noteable historic customs from the late 30's to the mid 60's . It was quite an interesting event as you could physically see the evolution of the custom over several decades . Here is a link to Rik Hovings post on this historic event . Customs GNRS 2011 The Customs Then & Now Show... my story. - THE H.A.M.B. Rik had a problem with his photo hosting site and all images may not appear. this link is to his hosting site http://public.fotki.com/Rikster/11_car_photos/beautiful_custom_cars/vintage_custom_car-1/custom-car-shows-2011/gnrs-2011-custom-cars/gnrs-2011-customs-t/
  6. 1948-1949 Cadillac Tail lamps with extension and fuel pocket for sale (used). Located South side of Chicago. Asking for 250.00, for further details please call (773)585-8900 Monday - Friday 8am to 5pm.
  7. The best and most accurate way of matching color is to have your PBE supplier take a reading of the desired color with a colorspectrometer which is supported by a data base of all currently available colors that can be mixed with the current mixing system toners . You will need a good clean sample of the original color a minimum of 3 " in diameter for best results. There are some companies that have reformulated some older colors so they can be mixed from current toners but those may be a limited selection. Colors from the early 50's we not as complex as todays colors and usually used less than a dozen toners to make up the color . You will also note on some of the old Dulux color formulas that they were mixed by volume . All materials are mixed by weight now .
  8. Mfg 9/73, 75,254 mi, A/C , A/T Nice unmolested Z . Fresh professional bare metal refinish on extremely nice Ca. car . Underside / engine compartment detail and refinish of all suspension and components. Nice original interior. Too many new parts to list. Located in SW Chicago. Additional pics showing original condition of car when purchased and during restoration at https://picasaweb.google.com/wgmauto/1974Datsun260z 773-585-8900 for additional info Asking $17,500.00 May consider trade for 1952 Lincoln Capri 2dr of similar condition.
  9. The VIN number on the post is the one you want to use. I had a Facel that was titled with the engine number and it would not be accepted by the auction house for sale until the correction was made . Wound up taking the car to the SOS inspection lane with the proper paperwork and it was a fairly simple fix but this was in Arizona during the January auctions and I'm sure the auction houses had made arrangements for this, as it appears to be a common issue from time to time with old cars . .
  10. Interesting thing about SRS systems is that GM / Oldsmobile produced a number ( cant remember if it was 100 or 500 ) of air bag equipped test cars in 1953. In the early eighties they found one of these cars in a barn in Nevada . They cleaned off the chicken manure got it running and test crashed it to see if the system still worked . This was just about the time that SRS systems were mandated by the Feds. I first saw this film at an I-Car traing class in the late 1980's . I believe they still use this early test film in their SRS instruction classes .
  11. This material has been used extensively by many auto manufacturers over the last decade to prevent stone chipping . There are no real negatives in regards to removal and color fadeing. The only difficulty we have experienced is when removing large areas of this film material ( dealer applied to the front 12 inches of a hood for example ) it is time consuming.
  12. These engines are not made for more than 4,500 RPM. The push rods are way to long and prone to bending above 4,000 RPM. There are some that have figured out a better set up but I dont remember where I read the article . It may have been on the HAMB as I think there was someone running one of these in a Bonneville car .
  13. You will need to decide on what style of seat belt you want to use . The old lap style belts can be installed quite easily but there is a reason they don't use them today. Lap belts cause the body to pivot at the hip area and offer no head or upper body protection from the dash and other components that are not people impact friendly. This was the reason the feds mandated a lap and shoulder belt in the late 60's . Installing a lap/shoulder belt can be involved and not to many shops will take on the liability of an installation.
  14. This may be one of those little known issues that comes up only when trouble strikes on certain cars or models. I have been in the auto collision repair business for over 40 years and this was one hell of a surprise when my daughter hit a piece of angle iron laying in the roadway. She coasted partially into a driveway to see what happened. She saw the flat and figured she would just pull up into a parking space and change the tire. The car would not move until the damaged tire was replaced and the receiver could get a signal showing a properly inflated tire in the flats place. Why some engineer at Toyota thought this was a good idea makes me question the engineer and the management that allowed this to be programmed into the tps system. The service writer at our local dealer was helpful in getting things resolved and mentioned this was becoming a issue . It was no big thing once the tire was changed but if you get a flat you better make sure your stopping in a secure place . Do other auto manufacturers use a similar program ? Dont know. All I know is it exists in this year and model. Why isn't there an outcry on the internet ? You will only know about this if the tire goes flat while the car is in motion. If you walk up to your parked car and discover a flat tire in the am and change it right away you'll never even be aware of this
  15. On many of today's late model cars with a tire pressure monitoring system. Getting a flat is quite an expierience. Got a flat . Once you stop the vehicle it will not move until the spare tire/wheel or other compatable inflated tire is installed on the car that is recognized by the system . The system overrides the trans and wont engage the unit. So if you hit a good pot hole, blow the tire and the car stopped ( just putting it in park will set it off ) in the lane of traffic on the expressway you dont get a chance to limp the auto off to a safe spot to change the tire . Ask me how I know and I have been fixing cars for over 40 years . There is no override and its not even mentioned in the owners manual. the service writer at the local dealership stated he got several calls a month about this issue . The wonders of modern technology .
  16. There is more to the story of this car . Are you really sure its a Zephyr ? Front pics are not that great and its difficult to confirm . Good ,clear pictures really help in identifying the car and its builder. It appears the car has been extensively customized in the 40's or early 50's. The cut down door belt line is a styling characteristic that was the craze back then . This car should be identifiable if it ever was completed . The car has also been sectioned horizontally. Look at the height of the hood in relation to the top of the fenders. This que starts to say early 50's California. It is not a " Valley Custom " car as there is no documentation of them ever doing a Zephyr and I would certainly think they influenced the thinking of whoever built this car as they were the first to modify a body with this technique. The length of the car also appears to have been altered . Sectioning will change the visual length of the car but the distance from the cowl to the center line of the rear axle appears to be longer than a standard Zephyr unless they started converting a long W/B 4dr or limo into a 2 seater . Bill is correct with his question about money and time. The info on who built this car and its history is important in determining if it is worth the money and effort to bring it back. If there is no significant historical connection it could at best be called a parts car but that would be streching it a bit and certainly not warrant the asking price. Yet if this came up as an old " Barris " car it could be worth the money . This car would easily consume over $100k in restoration expenses and that could be a conservative figure . If your serious about getting involved, post a thread on the HAMB inquiring about the history of this car or drop Rik Hoving a line @ rhoving@totalidentity.nl
  17. There is more to the story of this car . Are you really sure its a Zephyr ? Front pics are not that great and its difficult to confirm . Good ,clear pictures really help in identifying the car and its builder. It appears the car has been extensively customized in the 40's or early 50's. The cut down door belt line is a styling characteristic that was the craze back then . This car should be identifiable if it ever was completed . The car has also been sectioned horizontally. Look at the height of the hood in relation to the top of the fenders. This que starts to say early 50's California. It is not a " Valley Custom " car as there is no documentation of them ever doing a Zephyr and I would certainly think they influenced the thinking of whoever built this car as they were the first to modify a body with this technique. The length of the car also appears to have been altered . Sectioning will change the visual length of the car but the distance from the cowl to the center line of the rear axle appears to be longer than a standard Zephyr unless they started converting a long W/B 4dr or limo into a 2 seater . Bill is correct with his question about money and time. The info on who built this car and its history is important in determining if it is worth the money and effort to bring it back. If there is no significant historical connection it could at best be called a parts car but that would be streching it a bit and certainly not warrant the asking price. Yet if this came up as an old " Barris " car it could be worth the money . This car would easily consume over $100k in restoration expenses and that could be a conservative figure . If your serious about getting involved, post a thread on the HAMB inquiring about the history of this car or drop Rik Hoving a line @ rhoving@totalidentity.nl
  18. The good or bad depends on which "T" series car your thinking about. The common. Fairly reliable unless beat on fairly hard. Weak links ; the original Lucas fuel pumps , cranks were an issue years ago, trans shifter forks when worn will cause the car to pop out of gear , interior gets quite unpleasant on a hot day from the engine heat , fan blades are prone to flying into the radiator , original gearing makes highway speeds challenging ( (2500/3000 rpm plus ) , suicide doors can pop open on a bump ( especially if the body wood is rotted), replacing rotted body wood can get expensive, windshield wipers are not too good but can be hand operated if the motor goes out, a little unnerving on the highway next to a semi. Great handling and fun to drive, simple to repair as long as parts are available. The TD/TF are superior to the TC especially in the handling and braking areas . Ideal "T " series would be a TF 1500 . TCs take some effort to get them dialed in in the handling department. There is quite a lot in terms of parts available. You need to be aware of who the good vendors are for quality parts. Many of these cars have been tinkered with by owners attempting to make the T more modern like or for racing . Some have changed differentials , swapped in different transmissions , ect... . Some swaps have been more successful than others. The ideal T series drive is a on a hilly, winding 2 lane country road on a sunny 55 degree in the late fall.
  19. Your picture link is not working correctly . Elvis has touched on many of the major issues with the Starfire. The only thing I would add is to look carefully underneath at the floors and body mount areas. They are great for rusting especially in the rust belt states and if the car is stored in an unheated or damp location corrosion will cotinue to take its toll . Pay close attention to the rear body mount immediately behind the rear tires . I have seen cars with as little as 30k miles with holes in this area.
  20. I have used them several times with mixed results . They are back in time on their electronic communication and to the best of my knowledge rely on a part time ( a couple of days a week only ) girl to do their office and email.
  21. Check your local area for a rebuilder of truck clutches and brakes. They should have an adhesive that will work . Brake and clutch linings are bonded by an epoxy that is heated to cure . I would not take a chance with JB weld or other adhesives that are not designed for high friction applications.
  22. Look up Lance Troupe, he is in north Phoenix. He does extremely nice work .
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