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Fred Zwicker

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Everything posted by Fred Zwicker

  1. The car is in Canton, Ohio and on display in the cellar of a large hotel (Motorcar Portfolio). I asked Bob Lichty about the overdrive and as he recalls, it may have been an option in 1940 on Roadmasters and maybe Supers, so it is doubtful that this Buick Special has overdrive. He said that the radio will not work in his cellar display room anyhow, so can't come up with that information. I bought this car at the Motorcar Portfolio auction last year for $14,500 + 8% buyer's premium ($15,660) and I feel it was a very good buy, considering the overall condition. We have a car museum building in Canfield, Ohio. See www.tipcars.us We need more room and were going to add another car museum building, but never got past the permit process yet (lots of red tape), so the car is being offered by Motorcar Portfolio at an asking price of $13,995. The car is too nice to run through auction without a reserve and if not sold at a reasonable price, plan to put it on display if and when our new building is completed. Bottom line and well worth it is $12,000. Car can be seen at Motorcar Portfolio, 320 Market Ave S, Canton, OH 44702. Call Bob Lichty for information 330-453-8900, or see more pictures of the car at Motorcar Portfolio Vintage Car Specialists In addition to this car, there are several other Buicks that are for display and for sale. Fred
  2. Which Pontiac Wagon, Mike ? The '55 Safari with the whitewalls was restored by previous owner to original specs and appearance. The modified one with the blackwall tires and fancy wheels was an older build by a GM dealer in Georgia and completely redone in our shop (paint job & most of the interior - previously it was white). I like them both, but am going to be driving the modifed Safari as soon as we get the switch working on the Vintage Air and get the digital speedometer working - other than those two minor issues, this modified Safari could go just about anywhere. Check the interior, which we revamped in our shop, adding the center console and reworked the dash to match the exterior. I am getting sidetracked a bit, as would sure like to find a nice home for the 1940 Buick 2-door (we just have too many cars and not enough space - otherwise car would not be for sale). Fred
  3. I don't know, but it looks as if old age did it - looks like the paint has flaked off, as there is a small chunk near bottom. I never noticed this before. The car is 73 years old, so imagine that paint might flake off after so many years - that must be what's wrong with my hair - it keeps flaking off, especially in the top center of my head! Fritz
  4. Per current Krause Publications "2013 Collector Car Guide" - 1940 Buick Series 40, 8 cyl. 2 door sedan: #1 $31,400 #2 $21,980 #3 $14,130 This is a very nice car with excellent paint and chrome, a straight and nice solid body with no rust and presents itself well. You will look a long time to find anything nicer in this price range, as 1940 Buicks two doors are not easy to find in such condition. Car can be seen at Motorcar Portfolio in Canton, Ohio Mon - Sat.<!-- google_ad_section_end -->
  5. I am selling my outstanding 1940 Buick Special Model 40 two-door club sedan. This fine car has very nice black paint and a gray cloth interior. Powered by the 246 cubic-inch, inline overhead-valve straight eight with 3-speed manual transmission, this car is fitted with wide white wall tires, trim rings, optional fender skirts and fog lamps. It has nice chrome and is a very nice car that looks and drives great. The straight ohv 8 runs as smooth as silk. My car is currently located in Canton, Ohio at the Motorcar Portfolio and can be seen Monday - Saturday 9AM to 5PM. Asking $13,995, and well worth the price, but I have a little room for negotiation. I have many cars in my collection and am running out of space, currently concentrating on convertibles. Call 800-653-8900 or 330-453-8900 and ask for Bob Lichty, or view on line at the following link: Classic Motorcar Auctions - 1940 Buick Special<!-- google_ad_section_end -->
  6. Per current Krause Publications "2013 Collector Car Guide" - 1940 Buick Series 40, 8 cyl. 2 door sedan: #1 $31,400 #2 $21,980 #3 $14,130 The asking price more than takes into consideration the discrepancies noted by first reply. This is a very nice car with excellent paint and chrome, a straight and nice solid body with no rust and presents itself well. You will look a long time to find anything nicer in this price range, as 1940 Buicks two doors are not easy to find in such condition.
  7. I am selling my outstanding 1940 Buick Special Model 40 two-door club sedan. This fine car has very nice black paint and a gray cloth interior. Powered by the 246 cubic-inch, inline overhead-valve straight eight with 3-speed manual transmission, this car is fitted with wide white wall tires, trim rings, optional fender skirts and fog lamps. It has nice chrome and is a very nice car that looks and drives great. The straight ohv 8 runs as smooth as silk. My car is currently located in Canton, Ohio at the Motorcar Portfolio and can be seen Monday - Saturday 9AM to 5PM. Asking $13,995, and well worth the price, but I have a little room for negotiation. I have many cars in my collection and am running out of space, currently concentrating on convertibles. Call 800-653-8900 or 330-453-8900 and ask for Bob Lichty, or view on line at the following link: Classic Motorcar Auctions - 1940 Buick Special
  8. * Note This car belongs to my wife, and Mr. Earl is helping with this. The bar that I sent to my plater was almost, but not quite perfect - no cracks, no pitting, perfect chrome and just a few scuff marks, but for judging or show, I wanted it to be show quality chrome. My plater called me Thursday and said it was broken in half upon receipt (I now have a unique and very rare 2 piece grille bar). This car is scheduled to be shown at the Buick Nationals in South Bend this coming summer. Two days ago, I mentioned this to Mr. Earl, and he sure has come through again. He was of soooo much help when I restored my '54 Riviera Special 2dr HT and was the primary reason that the '54 was awarded a first place and 400 points at last years nationals in Charlotte. Attached are three other pictures of the '57 Super, showing the grille detail. This car is not a 400 point car, but sure is a nice one. I bought it in Ft. Wayne Indiana a few years ago from a nice gentleman who was selling it due to ill health and has later passed. I promised to take good care of the car and I plan to keep this promise. The picture posted of this car by Mr. Earl was taken in front of an original 100 year old home that was in front of the Firestone Testing Grounds in Columbiana, Ohio. The home has since been moved about a half-mile down the road facing a nice lake and is for sale with a waterfron view. Great look, but the cost to update the wiring, insulation, heating and plumbing would be staggering. So far no buyers and home is on a new foundation but no updates have been made as yet. Too bad they moved this house, as it was a favorite place to take photos. Fred P.S. This is "Be kind to Mr. Earl" month.
  9. I am firmly convinced that the Ethanol in our fuel is partially responsible for most of the fuel-related issues that we are having. The Etahanol seems to attack older type fuel hoses, fuel pumps and carburetors and causing us all kinds of troubles. We have a small car museum in Canfield, Ohio and most of our problems during the past 2 years have been traced back to the Ethanol problem. This coming week we will start the long process of elimination and hope we can come up with a solution. I tried to start the car again today and it cranked over rapidly, but would not start. Fred
  10. Here is a copy of the engine in my 1955 Pontiac Safari and I believe the color is correct for the engine. Fred
  11. Have you ever been driving one of your antique cars with your wife in the car and broken down, or driving one of your antique cars and having her follow you and broken down? Well it happened (again) today - third time in one year! Here are my experiences in late 2011 and 2012 so far, and the year isn't over yet. 1) Last summer we were going for a drive in our '47 Ford Convertible and stopped for gas. After putting in 10 gallons of gas, we were talking to a couple of old guys (younger than me, but old guys). They were admiring the car and commenting on how nice the flathead engine sounded. The car was idling at the pump. Suddenly, for no reason, it stopped running and would not start. The one guy drove me home to get my insurance card for a tow and brought me back 15 minutes later. Just for the heck of it I tried to start the car and it fired right up and we drove it home. Old Ford flatheads often have coil problems when they get old and when the coil heats up, the car stops running. So I sent the coil to Skip Haney in FL for rebuilding. I later reinstalled the coil and the Ford is now running perfecftly. Problem solved, but my wife hasn't ridden in the '47 Ford since! 2) Later last summer I was driving the my 1958 Continental home and wife was following me. The car suddenly stopped as if it ran out of gas. I coasted part way into a driveway (uphill) and the rear end was sticking out about half way into the right hand lane of a 2 lane country road with quite a bit of 50 mph traffic. To complicate matters it was getting dark. My wife was directly behind the Lincoln with the 4-way flashers in our SUV. Finally a couple of guys stopped and we pushed the car further into the driveway (off the road) and my wife pulled our SUV past the drive on the grass, also off the road. While waiting for the tow truck, I crawled under the Lincoln (boy are those '58 Lincolns low to the ground), and finally discovered that a wire had become disconnected from the electric fuel pump.I had a pair of pliers and some electrical tape and reinstalled the wire, started the car and had it running just as the tow truck arrived. He followed me back to work and we parked the Lincoln and drove home in our SUV. Since then we installed a rebuilt original mechanical fuel pump and the problem is solved for #2.. While it will take some smooth talking, I am hoping that my wife will probably still ride in (and maybe even drive) the Lincoln, as we had 4 or 5 of these in the mid 70s and never any issues such as this. 3) Today we drove to work to pick up her Mercedes 280SL to bring it home for some fall driving. When it started it sounded a little rough, but as it warmed up it improved, but not the same as before. So I proceeded to drive the car home without incident, but it was still not running as well as it did before.Just as we were about 3 miles from home), it stopped running as if it was out of fuel. Luckily there was a McDonald's entrance driveway and I coasted in the drive and half way into a parking spot. My wife and I then pushed the car into the spot. Although the gas gauge read 2/4 full (that's how Mercedes does it), I walked next door and bought a 2-gallon plastic container for ten bucks and put 2 gallons of premium into the tank to be sure. Car still wouldn't start. I then called Hagerty (luckily I have the 25-mile towing package). In about an hour a flatbed truck arrived and hauled the car to work, where we pushed it back into our car museum. See www.tipcars.us for pictures of some of our cars. We tried once more to start the car, but no luck. Tonight I noticed that the owner's manal mentioned something about a wire mesh fuel line filter and a cartridge buried somewhere under the hood. Did you ever see a Mercedes engine? Not easy to even locate anything, let alone fix something Have others had such an experience or experiences? If so, how many times and how long did it take your wife to get over it and to again be willing to drive or ride in one of your antique cars? I had her convinced that this would be a neat and dependable car for her to drive on weekends and she was looking forward to doing so. Now all of that is history and she wants a new Mercedes Roadster (just kidding). Any ideas? Fred
  12. Thanks Dan - The picture on Rob McDonald's post #11 to far left is the exact same pattern used by Buick on 1954 Specials (tan rope pattern, which is correct for the Special in 1954). I was able to purchase this material from CARS for my '54 Special. The center one looks similar to the trunk lining in my '56 original Roadmaster, but mine appearas to be a larger pattern. A picture of my 1956 Roadmaster very original trunk lining is attached. The 3rd one to far right looks to be the same as your post #14, other than a slightly different color. In the meantime, I was able to locate a partial roll of trunk material from the previous owner, who purchased this from SMS. Attached are two pctures of that material, which is close to, but not the exact same pattern as pictured in post #11 and post #14. I may check with SMS to see if the original is still available - if not will use what I have. Fred
  13. Thanks Dan - I sent you a PM. Fred Attached is a picture of my '54 Riviera shown at Charlotte 2012 (1st place Senior with 400 points). Two trunk pictures are also attached, showing the detail in process and after completion. I mouned my fire extinguisher on left side of trunk as shown, which is permissible for judging. More pictures of some of our Buicks can be seen at Home Page
  14. Thank you Paul - I guess it should be worth investing in some trunk material once I determine the correct material and color of the side cardboard. Car is at work, so I will take more trunk pictures next week before proceeding. Fred
  15. I bought this car from a private owner (who is now deceased) a few years ago and hope that the colors are original, but am not sure of the original paint codes. Attached picture shows the data plate - maybe someone can determine if colors are correct. If not correctly matching the data plate, hope it is at least a possible color combination for a 1957 Buick Super. Also attached are some pictures of the interior and one of the trunk as it is now. I have been out of town the past week, so apologize for the late reply, but will check out the sources mentioned by others, as I always like to have the correct trunk linings and cardboard sides if any. I have the proper sewing machines to handle this and do my own trunks, door panels and carpet, but do not do headliners or convertible tops. I sometimes do some work on seats, but not much. Thanks to others for their ideas. Fred
  16. I have a nice 1957 Buick Super with trunk lining currently lined with carpet. The rest of the car is quite original. Does anyone know the correct pattern of the trunk lining material and where to locate? I checked CARS catalog and don't think they list the material for the Super. Also what about the cardboard that goes along the sides? Picture of car attached, but no picture of trunk as yet. I am in hopes that I can locate the correct material and cardboard and show this car at next summer's Buick Nationals. Any ideas? Thanks, Fred
  17. Many friends from the 1954 Buick Forum all contributed to this restoration. I got plenty of advice and help from many, but especially from Mr. Earl. Steve (i motors) even donated a parts car which really helped. Thanks everyone! Fred
  18. I hear it both ways. I always refer to a "Body Off" when we remove the body from the frame, based on the theory that we are lifting the body off the frame. Others call it "Frame Off". What is your preference? Pictures (before and after) show our recent "Body Off" restoration of my 1954 Buick Riviera 2dr HT, which scored a perfect 400 score (out of 400 points) at the recent Buick Nationals in Charlotte this year. We didn't take the frame off the body, but we did take the body off the frame - this is the way that I always word this. I often hear auction companies and others use the term "Frame Off" and cannot figure out why. Fred
  19. I know of John Addams collection and he had some really nice cars. I guess the cars will be sold at the Glenmoor Gathering auction on September 15th in Canton, Ohio. I plan on being there, as I always make it to Glenmoor. Fred
  20. Thanks to all who helped figure this out. I printed this entire post and pictures and will bring to Charlotte in case judges have any questions. Fred
  21. Thanks Jim, Any documentation you (or anyone else) can furnish will be greatly appreciated. This car is so original that it is almost unbelievable, and I plan to keep it that way. I originally felt (and was hoping) that the license plate frames were original, as everything else certainly was so. A little more history. The first owner ordered the car new in 1956 from Coy Buick in Salem, Ohio, and at the same time the second owner (Richard) was working at his uncle's Buick dealership at about age 20. Richard actually prepped the car for the new owner (undercoating and whatever else was done) in June of 1956. Richard kept in contact with the owner, who finally sold it to Richard after 35 years. Richard's main goal was to keep the car original. However earlier this week in getting the car ready for judging, the license plate frames were questioned, as we truly did not know. Concerning originality - The only thing that came up over the years was that the stitching on the convertible top was getting dry-rotted, and about 5 or 6 years ago Richard took the car to the famous Jim Roll of New Philadelphia, Ohio. Jim is deceased now, but was not only the best around, he was a historian and spent countless hours on research so that his jobs were exactly the same as original. He correctly advised Richard that once a convertible top is removed, the material (especially near the bottom edges) is often dry-rotted, so it was necessary that a new top be installed. However the specs of the new top were identical to the original (including the number of stitches per inch as when new), and I am glad that this was done, as nothing distracts from a car more than a faded, dry-rotted top. Pictures do not do this car justice, as in person, the fit and finish exceed anything imaginable. Yesterday when we closed the driver's door after a safety check, it closed with a nice click like a refrigerator door. I am hoping that many can see and appreciate this car in Charlotte on Saturday, June 30 when it will be on display and judged in the Archival Class. This is one of the nicest non-restored cars that I have ever seen or owned, and spent its entire life only about 20 miles from my home since 1956. The owner and I still keep in contact and he still admits that he did not really want to sell the car (and still feels that way), but wanted it to be on display for others to see in our Car Museum at TP Tools in Canfield, Ohio. I appreciate his feelings and he has "visitation rights" to see the car any time. LOL. He is happy that the car is being shown nationally at Charlotte. See www.tpcarcollection.com or see www.facebook.com/tptools * As a side note, this car has the "original" whitewall tires from 1956, which were removed by the first owner after about 3000 miles and retained. He gave them to Richard, who reinstalled them on the car for the Glenmoor Gathering show last fall, where car won first place. The car now has these same "original" tires for viewing at Charlotte. Attached are two interior pictures, as well as some trunk pictures. Still looking for even more input on the license plate frames if possible and thank Jim and John for their ideas on this. Thanks guys! Fred
  22. Color pictures of the exterior, engine compatment, trunk floor, and possibly the underside of car might help create more interest.
  23. My car is "loaded" with every option that was available except air conditioning (to the best of my knowledge). It has a clock, trunk light and wheel covers (plus the license plate frames in question - front and rear). They are heavily chrome plated and not at all like what I have seen on frames from auto supply stores back in the 50s and 60s. I have a copy of the original Ohio Title, showing that the car was purchased on 6/7/56 from Wilbur L. Coy & Co. in Salem, Ohio. Model 76C. Delivered Purchase Price was $3480.00 plus Ohio Sales Tax of $104.40. Ohio stamped titles every year when plates were renewed and the original title is full of rubber-stamp renewals. Attached is a picture of this title, plus some engine pictures. Car has always been stored in a heated garage and never driven during inclement weather. It is a true "time capsule" and I am very lucky to have been able to buy this car. I am the 3rd owner - all documented. Last picture shows the car in our car museum at TP Tools in Canfield. See www.tpcarcollection.com for additional pictures, plus see www.facebook.com/tptools This car will be shown at the Buick Nationals in Charlotte on June 30, 2012. We can remove these license plate frames if necessary for judging (unrestored class), but they are so nicely installed that renewal won't be easy and this would be a last resort, so am hoping for more feedback if possible. Thanks, Fred
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