Starfire61

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About Starfire61

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  1. Thanks very much for the suggestion to check out the Multibeam threads. The information is extremely helpful. That is indeed the system that was originally on the car- I had no idea it was so precise. Still trying to nail-down whether I have the correct reflectors, but you've definitely given me some direction. Thanks again!
  2. I recently acquired a 1938 Olds F-Series convertible that has been converted to sealed beam headlights. In hoping to undo the conversion, I've managed to find a set of lenses that are correct for the Olds. These came in a batch of headlight parts that are mostly '39 Cadillac. I'm unsure which of these Cadillac parts might work on the Olds. The Cadillac buckets and aiming mechanisms clearly have a right side/left side orientation and look as though they'll fit into the Olds without difficulty. However, the reflectors are a puzzle. Both the headlight and parking light bulbs are offset slightly to one side of the reflector, and it's the same sided offset in both reflectors. I would think that the reflectors would be mirror images of each other if they were left & right sided, so I can't quite figure out what I'm dealing with. Why the offset? Did the '39 Cadillac have left/right sided headlight reflectors? FWIW, the '38 Olds master parts book lists only one headlight reflector for both sides of the F and L series of cars- part #922315. I'd be grateful if anyone can shed any light into whether these '39 Cadillac reflectors with their matching bulb offsets would be appropriate for a '38 Olds, and if not, what other headlight parts of the era might properly interchange. Buying this car was a big leap out of my early-60's comfort zone. Any advice or assistance would be much appreciated!
  3. I recently acquired a 1938 Olds F-Series convertible that has been converted to sealed beam headlights. In hoping to undo the conversion, I've managed to find a set of lenses that are correct for the Olds. These came in a batch of headlight parts that are mostly '39 Cadillac. I'm unsure which of these Cadillac parts might work on the Olds. The Cadillac buckets and aiming mechanisms clearly have a right side/left side orientation and look as though they'll fit into the Olds without difficulty. However, the reflectors are a puzzle. Both the headlight and parking light bulbs are offset slightly to one side of the reflector, and it's the same sided offset in both reflectors. I would think that the reflectors would be mirror images of each other if they were left & right sided, so I can't quite figure out what I'm dealing with. Why the offset? Did the '39 Cadillac have left/right sided headlight reflectors? FWIW, the '38 Olds master parts book lists only one headlight reflector for both sides of the F and L series of cars- part #922315. I'd be grateful if anyone can shed any light into whether these '39 Cadillac reflectors with their matching bulb offsets would be appropriate for a '38 Olds, and if not, what other headlight parts of the era might properly interchange. Buying this car was a big leap out of my early-60's comfort zone. Any advice or assistance would be much appreciated!
  4. An additional consideration towards ascertaining a value is knowing whether or not the car is a business coupe or a sport coupe. Business coupes had a trunk, while sport coupes had a rumble seat. Each bodystyle was available in the short wheelbase 6-cylinder and long-wheelbase 8-cylinder platforms. Does the car have a six or an eight? Trunk or rumble seat?
  5. The 394 in my '62 Starfire convertible is not original to the car. I'd like to find a cylinder head with an engine number that corresponds more closely with the car's build date of early April. Engine numbers within a range of 10-20K of G550000S would work. These numbers are stamped on a flat on the driver's side head that's located just below the lower edge of the valve cover and between the two inner spark plug holes. Willing to consider single heads or sets. Thanks! Chuck
  6. Thanks for the reply! PM sent. Chuck
  7. Thanks for the suggestions thus far. The pieces are rather intricate. I suppose they're more akin to fender or trunk scripts as opposed to a solid badge or emblem, so I apologize for my semantics. I've attached some pics of the boat and the scripts. Having never cast anything myself, I'm not sure if this would be the best project for a rookie, but if all else fails, I guess I'll give it a shot... Chuck
  8. Is anyone familiar with any businesses doing this sort of casting work on a small scale? I have two broken, chromed pot-metal badges from a vintage boat and would like to have them duplicated. Finding replacements is out of the question. Searching around online hasn't brought much success thus far. Chuck
  9. Mike, I'm glad you enjoyed the pics. Sorry for not being in touch for awhile- this time of year is always jammed with too many things to do. Steve, I'd love to have the car finished this year, but I think 2015 is looking more realistic (I hope.) The work on the interior is just beginning, and I haven't done a thing with the engine yet...though the transmission is ready to go. Finally seeing it in paint these past few weeks really has me motivated to bring it over the finish line as soon as possible. I've always liked Wedgewood Mist on these cars- it just doesn't photograph well under the fluorescent lights at the shop, but I'm very pleased when I see it in person. No doubt it will look even better wearing a fresh set of aluminum panels!!! Chuck
  10. Glad I could help, John. Hope all goes well with the project. BTW, the car looks great with the new top! Chuck
  11. This is not a fun project. Take out the console. If you're not skinny or limber, you also may want to take out the shifter. If your car has AC, you'll need to remove the duct that runs across the bottom of the dash. There are three nuts holding the clock to the back of the dash- two on the bottom and one on the top. You should be able to reach the lower two nuts at this point. Unfortunately, the upper nut is sandwiched between the top of the clock assembly and the bottom of the radio. Depending on the tools you have available, and your dexterity, you may not be able to reach the upper nut. In that case, you'll need to remove the radio, which pulls out thru the front of the dash after you free up the faceplate, remove the rear support bracket, and disconnect all the wiring. You may also need to remove the switches for the courtesy lights, top, and power antenna from underneath the upper lip of the dash, or you may not have enough clearance for the radio to slide out. Now you can remove the clock. I'm a big fan of keeping things original, but this is one time where I highly recommend doing a quartz conversion on the clock. Trust me, this is not something you'll want to do more than once. Good luck! Chuck
  12. The 2007 thread that IDed Florence Henderson's Starfire was one of the most memorable to ever appear on this forum. However minimal, I'm glad to have played a role in it. Todd, thank you very much for the link to the podcast. It is a fabulous effort on your part. I can only imagine the convolutions you must have gone through just to get both Florence Henderson and Bill Hayes on the line simultaneously, let alone to reminisce for an hour about working with Olds over 50 years ago. I knew of of Florence Henderson's involvement in Oldsmobile commercials, but I had no idea about the lavish stage productions that the division apparently mounted to introduce the new models to its dealers. What a truly fascinating glimpse into another time. Show tunes or not, this podcast is well-worth a listen for anyone intersted in Oldsmobiles of this era! Great work, Todd, & thanks again! Chuck
  13. Here's a picture of a red interior in a '62 Starfire. The front seats in this car have been poorly done in vinyl. The colors are off, and some of the perimeter piping was omitted. The rear is the original leather and gives a reasonable idea of how it's supposed to look. In your picture, the area to the left appears to be a slightly lighter shade of red, which is correct. However, it appears that the entire center section of the seat was done in a darker red- this instead should be two dark sections divided by a vertical band of the lighter color. Perhaps this is something else you can use to drive the price down.... I've been to Downers Grove a few times. It's a nice cruise. Unfortunately, by the time I drive over there after work on a Friday, it's often difficult to find a good spot. I usually wind up going to the one in downtown Wheaton instead- it's close enough that I can walk back to the house if necessary. Chuck
  14. I second what Paul said about the trans. I just had a Slim-Jim rebuilt that had sat for many years. Most of the clutch plates had lost their friction material, and the rear carrier assembly was locked-up from the sludge that remained of the old trans fluid. A few years ago, I paid $4400 for a rust-free '62 Starfire that ran. (Not well, but at least the car could be driven.) I'd politely suggest to your friend that he gets the car running before paying $5K- you could be out close to another $2K if the transmission needs another rebuild. All that aside, these are great cars that perform well and turn a lot of heads. Ron, I'm located in Wheaton and have several full-sized 61's and 62's. Feel free to PM me if you want to talk on the phone. I have some time off next week and would be willing to meet up with you to check out the car if it's local. Chuck