Mims

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About Mims

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  1. Mr. Phelps, if I had a set of gaskets (Victor or McCord) would cross reference the parts numbers with the local NAPA or Advance Auto Parts. They do have the Felpro gaskets upon order with the parts numbers (FELPRO). The number has been listed on this AACA site before. This place seems to have the complete set or parts: http://www.marxparts.com/lincoln.htm Also, check to see if the rear main and possibly the rope seal on your current engine was modified when the engine was rebuilt about 30 years ago.
  2. Look, you have several major problems with that engine that are not necessarily prevalent to Flat Head Ford Lincoln V12 Engines. That engine needs to be rebuilt and machined in several areas for the tolerances. If you want free advice I can be reached by e-mail at mauricebeth@bellsouth.net. Send me your phone number and I'll give you a call. You don't need to spend any more money on that engine without a proper rebuild as much as the parts are for Lincoln V12 engines are these day.
  3. In the late 1960's or 70's there was a dentist from Macon, Georgia by the name of Dr. Pratt if I remember correctly. At the time he had the only other 1940 Lincoln Zephyr (white) five window coupe we (my dad and I) were aware of in Georgia. My dad had a black 41. Dr. Pratt was a member of LZOC if I remember correctly. Anyway, he had updated the car and added air conditioning. If I remember correctly all of the components that were regularly mounted under the dash of most cars were in the trunk. I believe there are several structural holes located under the back window where he adapted the wholes to use as the vents for the ac system. Being a kid at the time I thought it was a neat adaptation. Dr. Pratt eventually sold the car and I have always wondered whatever happened to the car.
  4. Here is something that I wrote on this subject a while back: While I am no longer in the Lincoln business I have read a few articles on this in Hot Rod Magazine for one and had some experience as with Air Emissions and Diesel engines in the last few years. OK, here goes, this is my personal opinion. The engines being manufactured today have closer tolerances due to all of the computer systems used for machining versus what was produced years ago. Hot Rod Magazine mentioned a while back that the oils now being used have less or different additives in them due to the tighter emissions laws for vehicles. Thus you have tighter clearances on the flat cam tappets or lifters and the cams versus what was produced years ago. Probably an earlier engine is going to or may chew the lobes on the cam due to oil design and looser tolerances. The oils today with the additives are less forgiving due to possibly being thinner or less lubricant due to the deletion of the additives. A flat lifter/cam is going to have a higher coefficient of static friction (engineering term) versus a roller lifter or tappet/cam. One question that I have is have the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) standards for oil changed in the last few years. Hot Rod Magazine in two different articles has mentioned using the Shell Rotella oil for engines. This is the diesel engine oil. My thinking is that the reason for using the oil is that there are more lubricant additives in the oil versus regular gasoline engine/type oil. Diesel engines on road and off road have higher emission limits for NOX and other things versus gasoline engines and have had for years, thus they can still put things in the additives for oil. They have lowered the emission limits for new diesel engines on and off road and this may change over the next few years. In the October 2006 issue of Hot Rod Magazine they have rebuilt a " Junk Yard Jewel " Pontiac 400 engine and use the Shell Rotella oil. There is an earlier article on the cams and oil but I have thrown out the article. Anyway, Shell has the oil available at www.rotella.com in grades 15w-40 and 10w-30. That's my two cents worth of thought on this subject. Let me know what you guys think. Thanks, Mims
  5. It's been a while since I have been on here but I had a question. In looking at the body lines of 37 to 39 Lincoln Zephyrs and 40 to 41 Zephyrs and availability, would be possible to take a 4 door and chop it to a 3 window coupe? While I would not suggest taking a perfectly good car and doing this I see occasionally a parts car on the Internet with no drive train. Since the car is probably just for parts why not make a 3 window coupe street rod out of it if possible. Reason for the question is that recently in Hod Rod Magazine I believe someone chopped a 4 door into a 3 window coupe for a street rod (36 Ford). Just wondered with the existing bodies if this was possible.
  6. I was just reviewing your posting on the engine noise. The 1941 LZOC coupe that my father had and is now owned by my brother in laws brother had the engine rebuilt by my father in the late 60's or the early 70's. When the engine was rebuilt my father had the original pistons knurled if I have that spelled currectly. There were indentations or dimples put into the side of the pistons to make them a bit larger. They were the steel pistons and may have been the originals. Anyway, the engine would crank cold and run fine. The problem that occurred is that when the engine heated up it was difficult to turn over with the starter and crank after getting hot. He had to install a 12 volt battery as a back up to get it to crank when the engine was hot. The basic problem to all of this was that the tolerances were too tight with the pistons making for difficulty cranking the engine. If you are having tolerance problems with the pistons are you having any difficulty cranking the engine after it gets hot? Mims
  7. I was looking at the photos of your heads and they appear to have been milled or resurfaced in the past at least one or more times. From my experience working with my dad in a automotive machine shop in the past heads are usually milled by either one or two machines that I have seen. One method is where the the inside of the head facing up is passed over with a rotating head which has cutting bits evenly spaced on the 360 degree cutter. From the lines in the surface of your head this appears to what has been used in the past. The other machine has a grinding rock in a hole on a flat surface of the machine. The level of the grinding rock in the machine is raised or lowered and the head is moved face down over the rock. While the hole in your head may be repaired the surface area left may or may not be enough to allow another resufacing job. The sections of each cylinder below the spark plugs appear to be getting pretty thin or even with the out side surface of the head between the cylinders. Before you spend the money to have the heads repaired you might want to compare or measure these areas with another set of heads iron or aluminum that have not been milled maybe so many times or talk with a machine shop in your area that has experience with Lincoln or Flat Head Ford engines.
  8. There is currently a 1941 Lincoln Zephyr 3 Window Coupe for sale on E-Bay at the following: http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/1941-Linc...1QQcmdZViewItem the car from the outside looks like a 41. The dash looks more like a 42 on. Did they make a design change to the dash in the latter part of the 41 year models? What gives? Maurice
  9. I have the following hood for sale. The hood is an aftermarket fiberglass hood that will fit a 1964-66 Ford Mustang. Other than being a bit dusty the hood is in good shape. Perfect for someone building that 60's drag strip Mustang. The hood can be picked up either in Hazlehurst (southeast Georgia) or the metro Atlanta offer. I can be reached at mauricebeth@bellsouth.net. Thanks, Mims
  10. I had a guy call me tonight looking for a 40-41 Lincoln Zephhyr 5 window coupe for sale. He saw the pictures of the one I used to have and wanted to buy something in that condition around that price range. He is retired living in Florida and looking for one. Here is his information: Bob German 1905 Old Dixie Highway Titusville, Florida 32796 321-267-2533 The reason I am passing this on for him is the guy is not very computer savvy according to him. Thanks, Mims
  11. I have a 3 speed manual transmission from a roughly 66 to 68 Pontiac Firebird with the 326 V8 engine I need to get rid of. The transmission has been in storage for over 30 years and was working when removed from the car. The transmission can be picked up in southeast Georgia at Hazlehurst or can be picked up in metro Atlanta. This is part of an estate clean out so it will either go to someone who can use it or for scrap. I can be contacted at mauricebeth@bellsouth.net. Mims
  12. I am in the process of cleaning out a garage and estate in southeast Georgia (Hazlehurst). I have a few related new Ford parts from the late 30's to early 60's in the box. The parts are mostly down to pressure plates, wheel cylinders, master cylinders, and fuel pumps. The parts are NOS from a former Western Auto store. I am interested in selling the whole lot as is. Anyone intersted can reach me at mauricebeth@bellsouth.net. The house and huge garage are also for sale.
  13. I am in the process of cleaning out a garage and estate in southeast Georgia (Hazlehurst). I have a few related new Ford parts from the late 40's and early 60's in the box. The parts are mostly down to pressure plates, wheel cylinders, master cylinders, and fuel pumps. The parts are NOS from a former Western Auto store. I am interested in selling the whole lot as is. Anyone intersted can reach me at mauricebeth@bellsouth.net. The house and huge garage are also for sale.
  14. I am in the process of cleaning out a garage and estate in southeast Georgia (Hazlehurst). I have a few related new Chevy parts from the late 50's and early 60's in the box. The parts are mostly down to pressure plates, wheel cylinders, master cylinders, and fuel pumps. The parts are NOS from a former Western Auto store. I am interested in selling the whole lot as is. Anyone intersted can reach me at mauricebeth@bellsouth.net. The house and huge garage are also for sale.
  15. I have just spent the better part of probably 20 minutes trying to get your e-mail address with all of the asteriks and whatever figured out to send you the following note concerning your question. I then get back a response pertaining to your spam filter. +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Saw your note on the Lincoln web page. My father ran an automotive machine shop for a number of years and I remember generally what they do when fitting king pins and bushings. If I remember correctly you should have 4 bronze bushings and two king pings along with retainer or lock rings in the kit. The spindles along with the kit will need to be taken to the automotive machine shop that can do the work. The old bronze bushings (two per spindle) will have to be driven out of the spindles with a hammer and a chisel. My dad had a special tool made which would literally split and remove them. The new bronze bushings will have to be pressed in with a hydraulic press which can align everything versus trying to beat them in with a hammer. A proper machine shop will then need something like a Sunnen honing maching to hone the bushings into the proper clearance or tolerance for the kings pins. They should basically slide through the two bushing with ease after the honing. Sunnen honing machines are also used to rebuild both ends of piston/connecting rods with the proper equipment. Since I have been out of this type of stuff for more than 25 years I could not even tell you if this type of equipment is used with the newer cars. Also, to the best of my knowledge I have never seen the entire front axle taken to the machine shop for fitting, only the parts. Advise is free, hope I have been of some help. Mims