carbking

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Everything posted by carbking

  1. Stromberg made some of the finest carburetors ever made, anywhere, at any price. That doesn't prevent someone from pulling one from under the workbench that is incorrect for the vehicle, or the carburetor being incorrectly set up for the vehicle in question. Exactly which Stromberg are you dealing with? What type of fuel delivery system? If pressure, how much pressure? Where is the backfire? Through the carburetor, or through the exhaust? And GUESSING (never a good idea, but I do it anyway): If you have one of the SF series Stromberg carbs, the SF series use an inverse idle circuit. Adjusting "IN" makes the mixture richer, "OUT" makes the mixture leaner. If the screw is completely closed, that would be the richest idle setting. The high speed adjustment (if present), is the conventional in lean, out rich. The suggested initial setting was 2 1/2 complete turns from lightly seated. IF YOU HAVE ANY OTHER STROMBERG THAN AN SF SERIES, DISREGARD THE ABOVE! And you mention having done everything else, but you suspect fuel starvation. No offense intended, but valves which are too tight will mimic this symptom, as will a defective electronic distributor conversion. In fact, if an electronic conversion is done, ALWAYS the first test is to UPGRADE back to points/condenser. Jon.
  2. From your posts, three things come to mind: (1) As mentioned several times by others in the thread, a vacuum leak will render the idle mixture control screws unresponsive. (2) Low compression could also be the cause of an some of your issues; have you run a compression test? (3) We have had literally hundreds of customers with "carburetor idle issues" that were solved by an upgrade to points and condenser! If you are in love with electronics, so be it, but try the points and condenser as a validity test. Not sure when Buick changed from generator to alternator, but electronics require a stable voltage. A generator does not provide a sufficiently stable voltage at idle. If compression is reasonable, you turn up no vacuum leaks, and a test using points and condenser does not find the problem, the carb would be the next place to look. Another thought: the picture is of a beautiful car. Does the engine compartment look the same way? If so, try taking a battery jumper cable from the ground post of the battery to a head bolt. Cannot over-emphasize the importance of voltage at idle with electronics. Jon.
  3. Carter produced 68 different BB updraft carburetors, of which several were for Chrysler Corporation. Once the tag is removed, very difficult (and expensive) but not impossible to identify. Positive identification requires total disassembly of the carburetor, and comparison of each component to bills-of-material, until all but one are eliminated. Jon.
  4. All are steel. Two are black oxide, the others either white zinc or white cad. Jon.
  5. Carburetor screw sale Selling off excess inventory. To get American-made screws, had to buy many of these 10,000 per order. Now that we are no longer restoring carbs, selling off some of the excess. Prices are per 100 by size. Postage will be extra, but unless you purchase thousands, should be able to fit them in a USPS flat rate package around $10. Will give a link to a picture, so you can see the actual screw. 4x36x1/4 Slotted Fillister $12.00/100 4x40x5/16 Slotted Fillister $12.00/100 5x40x5/16 Slotted Fillister $12.00/100 5/40x5/16 Slotted Round $10.00/100 6x32x1/2 Slotted Fillister $12.00/100 8x32x3/8 Slotted Fillister $12.00/100 8x32x7/16 Slotted Fillister $12.00/100 8x32x5/8 Slotted Flat $14.00/100 10x24x5/8 Slotted Fillister $18.00/100 10x32x1/2 Slotted Fillister $9.00/100 10x32x3/4 Slotted Fillister $12.00/100 12x28x1/2 Slotted Fillister $20.00/100 1/4x20x3/4 Slotted Fillister $18.00/100 1/4x20x7/8 Slotted Fillister $18.00/100 http://www.thecarburetorshop.com/Car...screw_sale.JPG Jon.
  6. Frank - the farmers that sell it are smart enough not to use it No demand, no supply! Jon.
  7. And the original poster asked about which fuel to use. The link is to a short article on octane ratings: http://www.thecarburetorshop.com/Octane.htm If one will use one's favorite search engine, and search for RON MON AKI one can find charts which approximate octane ratings in the different systems for the same fuel. Jon.
  8. This was a recent topic on a different old car forum, below is my response: Here in central Missouri, we have, at the pumps: Regular - 87 AKI octane, with 10 percent ethanol Regular+ - 88 AKI octane, mixture of Regular 87 (10 percent), and Premium 93 AKI (90 percent) Premium - 93 AKI octane, no ethanol I thought that the lower grades had no ethanol, but the statements on the pumps were misleading, so I asked. According to the refiner, the premium gas is basically available for the older collector cars (many that do not need premium). The 87, with ethanol, is available for those that want cheap. As far as is the ethanol "cleaner" than non-ethanol, the newest EPA studies, which according to the internet aren't that new, but were politically pigeon-holed for several years, clearly show that the E-10 is dirtier than E-0. Our grandchildren will curse this generation for using ethanol because of the pollution it causes. I finally gave up and started using E-10 in most of my carbureted engines. Most of the small engines do not have sufficient compression to take advantage of the octane in the premium (non-ethanol) fuel. I use more fuel, but still cheaper as the E-10 is about $1.25/gallon cheaper than the E-0. So far, the only GOOD thing I have found (other than cheap) about the E-10, is my John Deere (fuel injected) L & G starts sputtering if I try to mow in sunshine when the ambient is 90 degrees F. or higher when using E-10. It runs fine on E-0 at ambient above 100 degrees F. "Honey, I have to come in for awhile, the mower is giving me problems in the heat", I'll finish the yard when it cools off"! Maybe if we go to E15, the mower will quite at 85 degrees instead of 90 Locally, when E-85 came out, there were a number of stations selling it. Today, because of the total lack of demand, I do not know of a station within a 50 mile radius that sells E-85. Your liquid-cooled carbureted vehicles can have the carburetors recalibrated to use E-10 or E-15. Your mileage will decrease. Your power (on an engine designed for pump gasoline) will also decrease. Air-cooled engines can be a different story! Your BEST insurance to DELAY, not stop, the long term effects of ethanol on the carburetor body, is to NEVER allow the ethanol-laced fuel to stay in the vehicle for more than 6 weeks. Drive more, have more fun! Jon
  9. Mostly agree with Ed's comment above; however in this case, finding the correct bowl MIGHT be close to impossible, or at least VERY EXPENSIVE. I like to keep them original IF POSSIBLE. Jon
  10. Generally, too small a carburetor will run too RICH, thereby cutting into fuel economy. Too large a carburetor will run lean. Don't know about pollution, but would think the smaller carb would contribute to higher pollution. Jon.
  11. Trini - a few observations: (1) Obviously, you have spent quite a bit of money prior to acquiring the BB-1. Perhaps you could recoup some of that investment. If you were to partially disassemble the UX-2 that you have to determine venturi size, and then good pictures of the exterior, it is possible that you could find someone that could use it. You are certainly not the only one with UX-2 issues. (2) Stromberg, like many other companies, went through the alphabet. The earliest Strombergs were type A. And while the type U came after the type T; physically, the types T and U are not overly similar (other than both being updraft). However, the type T was VERY similar to the type O, which it replaced; and for many years we have suggested to owners with vehicles originally equipped with the Stromberg type T, to replace with the BRASS type O of similar size and configuration. You may have found an OX-2 on the engine, which if correct internally, is an excellent replacement for the zinc alloy type T. (3) Actually, some companies DID provide updates in the late 1920's. I know Oakland/Pontiac started sending service letters as early as 1923. Carter, Stromberg, and Zenith carburetor companies ALL provided updates at least as early as the mid-20's. The problem today is that very few of these bulletins survive. Over the past 50 plus years, I probably have accumulated 99 percent of the updates from Oakland/Pontiac, Carter, Stromberg, and Zenith. And while it is difficult for me to ever compliment Marvel Carburetor Company , Marvel did a wonderful job of providing updates. I have a very large binder full of them. Jon.
  12. A bit more information on the Stromberg UX-2: I have 70 entries in my carburetor database. Of these, only two are for Dodge (1928 Standard and Victory sixes), and the 1928 model 130 export. The carb was original equipment on engines from 147 CID to 354 CID. Thus, internal venturii sizes varied, but external throttle configurations also varied. This, unfortunately, is a "bug" that bites many enthusiasts in the area of carburetor acquisition. A parts book or an owners manual or a well-meaning internet forum blog states a certain model carburetor was used on a certain model car. And it may have been, but not ALL versions of that carburetor would work, or even fit, the vehicle in question. Often, original documentation exists: a picture in an original owners manual, illustrated original parts manuals, or original carburetor parts sheets. Aftermarket documentation (Motors, Chiltons, Hollanders, Dykes, Radco, etc.) can be useful, but it should be a starting point for more research. Jon.
  13. According to my information, there were early production and late production carburetors for the 1928 Senior Six. The early production used a Stromberg type TX-2 carb (Dodge # AB-200-328) same as the 1928 Victory Six The late production used a Stromberg type UX-3 carb (Dodge # AB-202-819) The number in the Stromberg type is the S.A.E. flange size; thus the TX-2 is a size 2 (center to center 2 11/16 inch) and the UX-3 is as size 3 (center to center 2 15/16 inch). The "X" in the Stromberg type means "cross flange"; thus drawing a straight line between the two mounting holes would run fender to fender on either the TX-2 or UX-3. Trini - my guess would be that your Senior Six is an early production, thus originally equipped with the Stromberg type TX-2 carburetor. I do not have intake manifold information, but again guessing that the early production and late production used different intake manifolds, as the carburetor flange mounting was different. The 1929 Senior Six is shown as using the exact same carburetor as the late 1928. Perhaps you could find an owner with a 1929 manifold to compare. Jon.
  14. Todd - it is the original for the GMC Pontiac engine. Other than most parts for it are available mail order only (and they ARE AVAILABLE mail order), the only real issue with the carb is the aluminum throttle body. It wears, and after a 100k or so miles needs bushing. Any competent carburetor rebuilder will automatically bush them making them near bullet-proof for another 200k or more miles. Jon.
  15. The carburetor you have is one of the very best two-barrel carburetors ever built, at any price, at any time, anywhere in the world. DON'T REPLACE IT! If you ignore the above and replace it, DON'T TURN IN THE OLD ONE! That part number is exceptionally rare and desirable to some of the numbers-matching folks, and is worth big money! Jon.
  16. Giorgio - I do not know the quality of fuel you can buy in Germany, but this is a COMMON issue here in the USA. Try changing the method of starting the engine when the engine is hot. (1) DO NOT EVEN LOOK AT THE FOOTFEED, LET ALONE THINKING ABOUT TOUCHING IT!!! (2) Do NOT activate the choke! (3) Turn on the key, and begin to crank the engine over (4) After 3 to 7 seconds (each engine has a "sweet spot" and you will have to experiment to find yours, WHILE STILL CRANKING the engine, GENTLY press the footfeed down approximately 1/4 of the way. (5) The engine should start, and run rough. Hold a high idle (approximately 1500 RPM) for about 15 seconds. (6) You now should be good to go. Only use this method on a hot engine from maybe 2 minutes to 2 hours after shutdown. The rest of the time, use your normal starting procedure. Jon.
  17. The EE-22 is quite easy to adjust; however, a compression test, and a good ignition tune-up should be a precursor to playing with the carburetor. Assuming he has done BOTH of the above, and BOTH pass muster; then set the idle mixture control screws at an initial setting of 1 turn from lightly seated; then adjust the curb idle with the idle positioner screw. Actual adjusting range on the idle mixture control screws is 1/2 turn to 1 1/2 turns; but if the engine is healthy and the ignition is functioning correctly,1 turn should be very close. I would not consider the $1500. to be at all excessive (maybe cheap) IF the bowl is good. LOTS of EE-22's are available with bad bowls for a lot less. The bowl is the critical part. Jon.
  18. The original 2-barrel used on the GMC 287 is very difficult to find, and very expensive; however, rebuilding kits are readily available. The carburetor should be a Stromberg type WW, and the identification number will be stamped (NOT a raised number, but a stamped recessed number) on the of the top casting in the area above where the fuel inlet enters the bowl. Should be in the format 23-???? where the four ? represent either a 3 digit number or a 3 digit number followed by a letter. And one of the most reputable parts vendors on our planet specializes in older Pontiac parts. The would be Kelsey Pontiac (Kurt Kelsey) located in Iowa Falls, Iowa. Jon.
  19. In a single word: no. In more words: the throttle bores were moved further apart right after the EE-22 was discontinued to accommodate larger bores for the larger engines. Thus the newer throttle bodies have a different mounting footprint. Nothing bolt-on without fabricating a flange adapter. Anything used other than the original EE-22 is going to require: flange adapter, reworked throttle linkage, reworked choke linkage, reworked fuel line, and probably a different air cleaner. More information: The EE-22 (and EE-2) was Stromberg's first attempt at a "thin wall casting". This created a service problem with mechanics in a hurry. Stromberg issued service bulletins to the car companies, who in turn issued service bulletins to their dealers; but the bulletins were largely ignored. Stromberg suggested using two wrenches for the fuel line whenever the fuel line was removed/installed. Failure to do so cracked the bowl casting! After the issue was discovered, Stromberg reinforced the bowl at the point of the problem, but it only helped marginally. Still many failures due to the failure of mechanics to read or worse, ignore, the bulletins. EE-22 bowls have been RARE since at least the early 1970's when I acquired the remains of Stromberg. Since I had/still have the original prints, I looked into having the bowls reproduced. Turns out the casting is quite complex, and the tooling costs were staggering, so did not go forward with the project. What is a reasonable cost? What is the car worth running versus sitting not running? Other owners have been setting the value of the bowls for at least 50 years. The EE-22 model was produced in a number of different sizes. If your friend is fortunate enough to locate an EE-22 with a decent bowl, he should check the cast fraction on the bowl which denotes internal venturii size. From memory, there are 5 different sizes. The size needs to match. There are modern carbs that may be adapted. One such is the Stromberg WWC used by GMC on their large V-6 trucks in the 1960's. Sorry for the less than desirable information; please don't shoot the messenger. Jon.
  20. Correct. Chevrolet 6 between 1934 and 1936 (needed one more picture to determine exact year). Rebuilding kits are readily available. Would give some serious consideration to acquiring a different carb. The Carter is a decent carb (later Carter W-1's were excellent); HOWEVER my information says your model 77 is a 268 CID engine, and this carb was designed for a 206 CID. Think you might be down on power. Jon.
  21. Here in central Missouri, we have, at the pumps: Regular - 87 AKI octane, with 10 percent ethanol Regular+ - 88 AKI octane, mixture of Regular 87 (10 percent), and Premium 93 AKI (90 percent) Premium - 93 AKI octane, no ethanol I thought that the lower grades had no ethanol, but the statements on the pumps were misleading, so I asked. According to the refiner, the premium gas is basically available for the older collector cars (many that do not need premium). The 87, with ethanol, is available for those that want cheap. As far as is the ethanol "cleaner" than non-ethanol, the newest EPA studies, which according to the internet aren't that new, but were politically pigeon-holed for several years, clearly show that the E-10 is dirtier than E-0. Much as I dislike efi, efi is what is responsible for the cleaner air in our cities, not the presence of ethanol in the fuel. I still prefer a carburetor, but there is absolutely no doubt the efi is much cleaner. Our grandchildren will curse this generation for using ethanol. I finally gave up and started using E-10 in most of my carbureted engines. Most of the small engines do not have sufficient compression to take advantage of the octane in the premium (non-ethanol) fuel. I use more fuel, but still cheaper as the E-10 is about $1.25/gallon cheaper than the E-0. So far, the only GOOD thing I have found (other than cheap) about the E-10, is my John Deere (fuel injected) L & G starts sputtering if I try to mow in sunshine when the ambient is 90 degrees F. or higher when using E-10. It runs fine on E-0 at ambient above 100 degrees F. "Honey, I have to come in for awhile, the mower is giving me problems in the heat", I'll finish the yard when it cools off"! Jon.
  22. I looked in vain for a forum to sell tools. If I picked the wrong forum, would a moderator please move to the correct forum - Jon, Selling some miscellaneous shop tools, all working, that I no longer use: (1) DiAcro commercial tubing bender - will bend copper, steel, brass, aluminum tubing, even solid steel rod from 1/4 inch through 1/2 inch. With tooling for different radii. (2) Homemade hydraulic flaring tool to use with the bender when making fuel/brake lines. (3) Penske timing light (4) Two Penske engine analyzers, one portable, one shelf mount (5) Allen diagnostic oscilloscope (6) Compression gauge (7) WORKING Black & Decker valve seat tool from the 1920's in the original wooden box, really a nice addition to your "antique" garage. (8) A lot of other miscellaneous tools that belonged to my Dad WILL NOT SHIP! If you pick it up, can demonstrate that it works, and both of us are happy. The tubing bender and flaring tool are going to require a truck. 573-392-7378 (9-4 Mon-Tues central time). This phone is a land-line, does not accept texts. Located in Eldon, Missouri. Eldon is located on a 4 lane divided highway (US 54) 30 miles southwest of Jefferson City. Approximately 150 miles from either Kansas City or St. Louis, and approximately 100 miles from Springfield, Missouri. Jon.
  23. In the 1970's, Zenith Fuel Systems designed and sold an aftermarket carb specifically for the Ford Model A. The calibrations were the same as original, except for using the modern externally adjustable main metering jet instead of the original with the dash adjustment. We were (and still are) WD for Zenith, and we sold quite a few of these. There was a LOT of buying resistance, due to the lack of the dash adjustment; but once someone actually bought one, most admitted the dash adjustment was unnecessary. While I cannot be completely certain, without knowing the tag number, the carbs pictured by the OP appear to be these replacements. The tag number of the replacement was 13922. Jon.
  24. Ben - the 1957 design has an internal auxiliary air valve that is spring-loaded; same general principal as the Q-Jet. One piece of trivia you are not apt to ever see in factory or aftermarket documentation, is that the 4-GC with the auxiliary air valve uses the same spring as the Q-Jet air valve; and the adjustment is 1/2 turn past "touching" at an ambient of 65~70 degrees F. John D - your comments reinforce the idle tube increase work around. When the engine is warming up, the choke is still partially engaged, thus the mixture is slightly richer. If the vehicle is on an incline, the fuel level in the bowl may be slightly higher, thus making the mixture slightly richer. Changing the adjustment of the secondary engagement would make no difference at WOT. The engine needs slightly more fuel to eliminate the hesitation. The idle mixture control screws are greatly misunderstood; THEY DO NOT ADJUST THE MIXTURE! The idle mixture is adjusted internally by the orifices in the idle tubes, the idle air bleeds, and the idle bypass (also air). The mixture screws control the VOLUME of pre-determined mixture. Thus opening up the idle tubes actually DOES richen the mixture. The hesitation when turning right is a different issue, and a factory fix was issued by Rochester. Those who had their vehicles serviced at the dealership had the factory fix applied. When we were still restoring carbs, about 1 out of 3 had the patch, even those that had been "rebuilt". Apparently, the commercial rebuilders did not read the Rochester bulletins. Jon.
  25. Ben - the WOT from a stop sign was a minor issue from day 1. Remember there were many changes in engine size and carburetor design during this period. The modification of the idle tubes is a work-around, as is advancing the static timing a few degrees. The actual problem is that the 1956 Rochester has no auxiliary air valve. For 1957, Rochester added the auxiliary valve to the secondary. On the 1956 carb, WOT activates the secondary. On the 1957 carb, WOT opens the secondary throttle plates, but the auxiliary air valve prevents air from flowing in the secondary until a pre-determined vacuum is present in the intake. This solved the issue. Opening the throttle maybe only half way for 1/2 a second and then flooring the throttle might also work, maybe worth a try. Jon.