scott12180

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Everything posted by scott12180

  1. I think the very best driving Twin Six is the third series because by then they ironed out all the problems and produced a truly robust car. The first series with non-detachable heads is a bit of a problem although how often do you really need to remove the head?? Valves are acessible through screw-caps. The bigger problem is that the first series Twin tends to have a somewhat inadequate cooling syetem. This got better with the second series, and by the third series they really increased cooling capacity. However, I've been told that if you install a new radiator and have the engine tuned well, even a first series will run cool enough. So I've been told... I've also known owners of first series to install an auxillary radiator ! Another problem with Twins is the carburetor is in the V-ee of the engine, and the exhaust manifolds are ALSO in the V-ee. That makes for a very hot carburetor. So much that during the 1980's when gasoline was very bad, it was almost impossible to run one without vapor lock. Things are better today, but most owners still go through overtures to keep the carburetor cool. This placement of the carburetor was a good idea for 1915-1919 because gasoline was very poor in the opposite sense, in that it was hard to vaporize. You wanted a hot carburetor. Not so today. At any rate, all of this is surmountable. (Anything can be done with a deep enough checkbook.) Good luck looking for a Twin. You may contact Bill Boudway in Canandaguia, NY. He's supposedly the Keeper of the List for Twin Sixes although when I inquired he knew of nothing. Brad Skinner was THE Twin Six man for years and years. He lived in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, but he died several years ago. Very nice guy. Drove to Hershey right up to the year he died in his 80's. Send me a private e-mail with your address and I'll keep my eyes open if I hear of anything....anything that I don't want, that is ! --Scott
  2. On the overdrive, mine is a Mitchell unit. Made in California by a small family-run business. Nice folks. They originally made these things for motor homes and trucks, then branched out into antique cars when they realized there was a need. They come in a variety of four gearings --- something like 26%, 33%, one lower and one higher. I forget. You can change gears even after you buy the unit, which is nice. I got the 26% overdrive. I still sometimes wish I could have a higher speed, but I live in western New England and upstate New York with lots of hills and a great many slow country roads, so 26% is perfect for me. The unit mounts amidships, so you need to make a new driveshaft that has two sections -- one in front of the OD and the second in back. Up through 1933 (I think) you can easilly mount the overdrive to the frame. On those Packards with the X-member on the frame, it probably makes it alot harder to mount. I've thought about the practicality of mounting one on a Twin Six, but I think it wouldn't work due to interference with the torque arm. --Scott
  3. Well, yes, theoretically a Twin will go as fast as 70 mph. When the Twin was announced it was driven around the speedway at Indianapolis, reaching 70 mph with top and windshield up, so they are capable. But you certainly don't want to push an 85 year old car that fast. They are still geared rather low to suit the conditions of the day. The ones that I drove seemed comfortable at 40-45. It's the babbit in the engine bearings that gets pounded at high speeds. Remember these things have a long stroke, so that's alot of mass slinging around in there. The last thing you want is to throw a rod on a Twin Six engine. And, too, how do you stop the thing at 60 mph??? No, my philosophy has always been to drive an antique car like an antique. Even with my 1926 Eight and its overdrive, I never get it above 50, typically cruising at 40 - 45. Steve -- what do you like, the 1st, 2nd or 3rd Series? Me, I want a 1st or 2nd. --Scott
  4. Hi Steve, There are a number of Twin Sixes around but I don't see them driven. I think the brakes are the big issue, as they are a heavy car with two wheel brakes only. Fuel is not a problem. They should cruise nicely at 40 - 45 as you would expect. The problem is tring to stop them. That and alot of owners are now elderly and have a hard time handling a substantial car. And, too I guess, parts just aren't as plentiful as with later cars. And.... (I keep thinking of things) for all but the 1915's, there isn't a club hosting tours for Twins to participate with their own vintage, so you see them very seldomly on the road. Check the web site "packardsonline.com" for a list of what's owned and by whom. Twin Sixes are magnificent cars and I've wanted one for thirty years. I own a 1926 236 (Eight) Phaeton which is a delightful road car with a powerful engine, overdrive and four wheel brakes. Even if I had a Twin, I'd probably be more inclined to go for local drives with the Eight. Do you have a Twin Six? --Scott dwyers@rpi.edu
  5. Hi, Is the 1938 Buick Special a car that could really use an overdrive or high speed gears if it has the stock rear end? Is it very hard to find the rear axle from a Century or some other faster-geared car? Can I install an overdrive? Who makes one that fits? I'm looking for a 1938 and find there are alot of Specials around, but relativly few Centuries or Roadmasters. I was hoping for a car that would be able to do 55-60 without the engine screaming. --Scott
  6. Hi all, Is there a way to remove water stains from the headliner of a Sedan? The car, a 1934 Pierce-Arrow, had a roof leak in a rainstorm a few years ago which wet the headliner near the rear window. The owners did not do anything to remove the stains at the time. Can the stains be removed at all?? Thanks --- Scott
  7. Hi all, Is there a way to remove water stains from the headliner of a Sedan? The car had a roof leak in a rainstorm a few years ago which wet the headliner near the rear window. The owners did not do anything to remove the stains. Can they be removed at all?? Thanks --- Scott
  8. I should also add that installing high speed gears is not as trivial as removing the old ones and bolting the new ones in. Differential ring and pinion gears need to be fitted. The contact patch of one tooth of the pinion needs to be just right to the corresponding toothvalley of the ring --- exactly where on the tooth the contact is, the heel and toe adjustment, etc. If done incorrectly the differential will be noisy and the gears could fail. There is literature out there outlining how to do it, but for best results I'd get a professional, unless you are willing to invest the time learing the art. Installing a Mitchell overdrive isn't all that complicated. I think the average good-with-tools owner could handle it. You need to watch for alignment, making sure the universals on the front and rear of each driveshaft have the same angle. Not hard, just tedious. You'll need to cut some thick metal that Mitchell provides and maybe get creative on how to mount it. Access to a machine shop or serious tools is probably a must. I'd say that on most 1930's cars, the biggest problem might be the frame brace --- that "X-member" in the middle of the frame, as that's just about where the Mitchell want's to live. My 1926 didn't have that, of course, so my installation was straight forward. Someone, who's name I forget, makes a rebuilt old Borg-Warner overdrive that bolts onto the pinion gear housing on the differential. You send himm your pinion housing and he will fit his OD to it. I've no experience with this. --Scott --Scott
  9. I have a 1926 Packard Eight Phaeton to which I installed a Mitchell overdrive. The Mitchell unit does not require an additional gear shift. I mounted a push-pull cable under the dash which is very unobtrusive and works well. I would opt for the overdrive because I live in hilly country (New England) and frequently prefer the standard ratios over 2nd in OD. Mitchell has the advantage that you can choose from a wide variety of ratios. I chose a 26% reduction because I never drive on highways so keeping up with the SUV's at 70 mph is not a priority. My 26% Mitchell lets me criuse easilly at 45 - 50 without over-revving the engine. With an original babbit engine, you do NOT want to push the revs too high. I can also throddle down to 25 mph, still in OD, and enjoy our beautiful rolling scenery. The Packard has alot of flexibility due to the high torque engine. Mitchell makes a 33%, a still higher, the 26% and still lower reduction. They mount amid-ships and require that you make two new smaller driveshafts, which is a good idea anyway. The advantage is that because you will retain the original driveshaft you can always revert the car to 100% originality. The cost of the Mitchell was about $1500 plus installation. I don't think installation was difficult. They provide a full kit to help you out. The drawback with the Mitchell is that I think it's rather noisy. It does seem to quiet down with age, and I do seem to have gotten used to it. Bottom line, I love it. The high speed gears woudl not have provided enough of a high speed boost for my car and driving. The overdrive retains all the original gears plus gives you 26% or 33% or whateveryouwant beyond. I'd buy another one. It turns these old cars into something that can really be driven and enjoyed. --Scott
  10. Hi all, Can someone give me a clue as to what the value of a 1934 Pierce Arrow 836-A 5-passenger Sedan would be? The car is just about perfect mechanically. It's fully restored, sorted out and toured. The body is also restored with some water stains on the headliner from a leak that is now repaired. Otherwise, cosmetically it's authentic and very good. Not concours, I'd say it's a solid number Two condition... or optimistically between number One and number Two. Thanks for any insight. --Scott
  11. Any suggestions on how I can remove the rear wheel (brake drum and hub) from a taper axle shaft on a 1926 Packard? My wheel puller, which screws onto the hub cap threads, slips off because the wheel is so tight. Any suggestions appreciated. I need to get at those brakes ! --Scott
  12. Any sugestions on how to remove a stubborn rear wheel from a taper axle shaft? It's so tight that my wheel puller slips off the screw-on hubcap threads, so I can't get a grip on it. The car is a 1926 Packard. Advice appreciated !! I need to get at those brakes! --Scott
  13. Hi all, I own a 1926 Packard and need to remove the rear wheels to inspect the brakes, replace an oil seal, etc. The right side comes off fine, but someone overtightened the left side (apparently) and I just can't get the wheel off. My wheel puller slips on the hubcap threads because they've been buggered up, so that's kind of useless. Any suggestions? Any particular kind of wheel puller that really GRIPS the hubcap threads and won't slip off? Other tricks to get a wheel off? --Scott
  14. Does anyone have any experience with buying an American-make car in Europe and shipping it back to the States? I would like to go through a third-party broker of some sort who can look at the car and oversee the payment, the loading, shipping and the paperwork nightmare that will probably happen once it reaches our shores. Ideally, I'd like to have the car shipped right to my door in New York State. The car is a 1920's Packard with a body style that isn't too common over here, hence my interest in this car which is in Belgium. But perhaps this process is just too cost prohibitive? I don't know. Never done it. Thanks for any advice. --Scott
  15. Hi, Could anyone out there tell me the bearing area size on a 1st or 2nd Series Packard Eight? I'd like to know the rod bearing width and the diameter of the crankshaft at the connecting rods. Thanks alot! --Scott Troy, NY
  16. Hello, Has anyone had experience with Bob Jefferson and his restoration shop north of Boston? I beleve he calls himself "Sports Cars Unlimited". Would you say that on mechanical work he is good? Has anyone had a bad experience? I'm thinking of buying a car that has had an engine rebuild by Jefferson. Thanks -- Scott
  17. Hello, Has anyone had experience with Bob Jefferson and his restoration shop north of Boston? I believe he calls himself "Sports Cars Unlimited". Would you say that on mechanical work he is good? Has anyone had a bad experience? I'm thinking of buying a car that has had an engine rebuild by Jefferson. Thanks -- Scott
  18. Hi all, Can someone give me an estimate for how much a Packard Straight Eight engine weighs? No transmission. Big eight -- 3-1/2" x 5" bore stroke. Good guesses welcome, too. Thanks, --Scott
  19. Hi all, I've located a spare straight-eight engine for my car down in Florida. Any suggestions how I can ship it from there to my home near Albany, New York? --Scott
  20. Hi all, For 1911, Reo made three models. According to Bev Kime's "Standard Catalog", there was a Model 25 (98" wheelbase), and a Model 30 and Model 35, both with 108" wheelbase. How can you tell the Model 30 apart from the Model 35 by looking at the car? What was the engine bore and stroke of the Model 30 versus the Model 35? Thanks ---- Scott
  21. Hi all, For 1911, Reo made three models. According to Bev Kime's "Standard Catalog", there was a Model 25 (98" wheelbase), and a Model 30 and Model 35, both with 108" wheelbase. How can you tell the Model 30 apart from the Model 35 by looking at the car? What was the engine bore and stroke of the Model 30 versus the Model 35? Thanks ---- Scott
  22. Hi all, For 1911, Reo made three models. According to Bev Kime's "Standard Catalog", there was a Model 25 (98" wheelbase), and a Model 30 and Model 35, both with 108" wheelbase. How can you tell the Model 30 apart from the Model 35 by looking at the car? What was the engine bore and stroke of the Model 30 versus the Model 35? Thanks ---- Scott
  23. Hi, Can someone tell me the engine bore and stroke for a 35 HP Reo, 1911? Thanks --- Scott
  24. Hi all, I like antique cars prior to 1930 --- twenties and the teens. I have a job interview coming up at GE in Cincinatti in a week or so. I'm just curious what the laws are for driving antique cars in Ohio? Do you need to have them inspected every year like in NY? Do you need to register them every year, like in NY? Do you need to kiss some politician's *ss every year, pay the highest taxes in the nation and get nothing for it, like in NY? Seriously, I know the requirements are different in every state. I seem to recall Ohio being a bit friendlier than most. Am I right? Thanks, -- Scott
  25. Hi all, I have a 1926 Packard Eight with a Detroit Lubricator carburetor (spring-loaded air valves). I set the float to give a gasoline level of 3/16" below the top of the main jet. It does not leak or drip, so I know the level is below the top of the jet. However, I wonder if the level is set too high, will the mixture be too rich and give poor fuel economy? OR, is the mixture determined only by the setting of the air valve? The car runs fine, but the spark plugs are always black and sooty, and I only get about 10 miles per gallon. Should I lower the float level? And if so, to what? The Packard service manual recommends 1/8" below the top of the jet. I'm at 3/16" now. Thanks! --Scott Troy, NY