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scott12180

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Everything posted by scott12180

  1. Hello all, On the 1932 Packard Standard Eight the vibration dampener has a rubber inner disk with six cylindrical posts on each side. The posts nest into each half of the iron outer housing. I disassembled mine and cleaned out all the rust. The question is, should the inside be painted or coated with something to prevent rusting? Or should it all be left clean and bare (with the exception of the mating surface where the inner shaft must slide on the outer housing.) Thanks for any suggestions. --Scott
  2. Has anyone used "Automotive Friction" in Clackamas, Oregon to get their brake shoes relined? I have a 1926 236 Packard for which I need rear brakes. They sounded knowledgable on the telephone. Otherwise, any good recommendations? Thanks -- Scott
  3. Thanks for the explanation and great photos. That explains the 1920-1922 Bearcat. But the 1923 Stutz was now left hand drive. Four cylinder still offered on the 130 inch wheelbase, though, but the Bearcat was also up to a 130 inch wheelbase. Perhaps the better question is "was there a Bearcat offered in 1923"? Or by then was the two-seater ONLY called the "Roadster"? It is confusing because if the valuations stated in Bev Kimes book are at all realistic, there is a teriffic difference in value between the 1923 Stutz Bearcat and the 1923 Stutz Roadster. So that's why I'd like to know if yo
  4. But my inderstanding is that for 1923 the Bearcat acquired doors like the Roadster. That being, how do you tell the difference? --Scott
  5. Hi, For 1923, Bev Kimes book lists both a Roadster and Bearcat for 1923. What is the difference between a Bearcat and a Roadster for 1923? How do you tell by looking at the car? Thanks very much, -Scott
  6. Somebody ought to make a critical comment, so here goes: E-Bay makes it hard to get a good deal on parts because your audience is the whole world. For instance, I've lost lots parts to Australians who seem willing to pay any amount of money. It's driven up the price on so many good and needed parts. The other thing that really ticks me off is the whole "reserve price" auction. Especially with a whole car where you want to go look at it before you bid and traveling entails going some distance. Occasionally a seller will tell you his reserve, but most often not. I can't spend the money and
  7. Hello all, Can anyone recommend a source for 7.00 x 21" tires for my 1926 Packard? I bought Lesters last time and am not happy with them. They wear out very fast for one thing. I see Michelin and Dunlop at some of the larger tire companies for nearly $500 each. Needless to say, I'd like something more reasonably priced. Any sugestions appreciated. --Scott
  8. Hello all, Can anyone recommend a source for 7.00 x 21" tires for my 1926 Packard? I bought Lesters last time and am not happy with them. They wear out very fast for one thing. I see Michelin and Dunlop at some of the larger tire companies for nearly $500 each. Needless to say, I'd like something more reasonably priced. Any sugestions appreciated. --Scott
  9. Hi --- Could someone recommend a shipper to transport a 1929 Packard from the Missoula, Montana viscinity to upstate New York? Many carriers will not go to Montana due to weight restrictions on their trucks. And the thread about the problems with Passport/FedEx makes me not anxious to do business with them. (Although I asked them for a quote but have not heard back yet.) I would consider a private hauler with an enclosed trailer provided he came with good references. Thanks -- Scott
  10. Hi --- Could someone recommend a shipper to transport a 1929 Packard from the Missoula, Montana viscinity to upstate New York? Many carriers will not go to Montana due to weight restrictions on their trucks. And the thread about the problems with Passport/FedEx makes me not anxious to do business with them. (Although I asked them for a quote but have not heard back yet.) I would consider a private hauler with an enclosed trailer provided he came with good references. Thanks -- Scott
  11. Owning a gas station these days is a licence to print money. I refuse to believe that these guys are not making tons of cash --- from the local filling station to the distributor to the big oil companies. Case in point: There's a WalMart in Norwich, NY that has a gas station. My mother reported about two weeks ago that they were selling gasoline for $2.19 for regular. The corner station in her village of Greene, NY was over $3.00. . . . . Now, I'm SURE that WalMart is not selling gasoline at a loss. The profit margin on gasoline is just obscene. I wish we had an alternative. --Scott
  12. Perhaps one solution to the abuse of antique tags is to modify the age of a vehicle that can qualify for antique tags. A twenty-five year old car today really is not much different from a 2006 model, relative to a twenty-five year old car back in the 1950's when this rule was adopted. A better method might be to have a rolling qualification based on the percentage of total automobile history. What I mean is, say back in 1950 a 25 year old car qualified to be an antique by the AACA. That was roughly a car that was half as old as the automobile itself. In 1960, that logic would make a 1930
  13. A friend in the machine shop at work mentioned that he read (in Hemmings, I think) that legislation was introduced in Virginia to restrict the operation of antique and collector vehicles to a radius within 50 miles of the address where the car is registered. Any comments? Any truth to this? If true, what can possibly be the rationale or logic? Whenever I hear something like this I get really scared. Any time government thinks of a new way to take away more of our freedom, it is inevidable that it will spread. Today Virginia, tomorrow it's a federal law. --Scott 1926 Packard
  14. I believe that the 1932 Packard is a 901 Sedan, not a 902. Caveat Emptor
  15. How do you change read end gears? Do you mean find Century gears? And how easy is it to find them? Seems to me to be not so easy to do... And would a Buick Special have enough torque to handle higher speed gears in hilly country? --Scott
  16. Related to the "high speed gears" thread, I called "Gear Vendors" in California to inquire about their overdrives. They make an overdrive that can be installed in the torque tube, BUT if the torque tube is attached to the differential by rivets --- if it is not bolted on and not easilly removeable --- then it will not accommodate an overdrive. They do alot of Fords from the 1930's, but they think it won't work on Buick or other GM products. I don't own a car (yet) but am wondering about the overdrive option. Can someone tell me about how the torque tube is attached? Thanks --- Scott
  17. That's my point. There are a whole lot of 1930's Buick owners out there, and from what I can tell just about all of these cars would certainly benefit from an overdrive. I don't own a Buick just yet --- been looking for a good 1938 for a while now. Isn't there a Buick Club that could be "mobilized" to initiate a national project such as this? I'm sure Gear Vendors would be willing to work with a club on a large number of overdrive kits. Overdrives are great. I have one on a 1926 Packard (non-torque tube) and wouldn't be able to drive the car with a fraction of the enjoyment I get with
  18. Hi all, Has anyone out there undertaken the manufacture of high speed ring and pinion gears for pre-war Buicks (ie: 1938) ? I suppose these would be the same ratio as Buick Century gears. If no one has, it would be a good project. I would imagine there to be a good market for these. Others have done this with much success, such as Phil Bray's high speed gears for Packards. --Scott
  19. Here's the K&G wheel puller asembled. You screw it on the hub and insert the wedge into the slot on the end, which pushes against the axle end. Then as you drive the wedge, the puller tightens around the hub and pulls the wheel off. If you have one to sell or can help locate one, I'd appreciate hearing from you. --Scott
  20. Ok, so I don't know how to post photographs. I'll try this way --- K & G Wheel puller wanted, just like this one. This fits 2-3/4" hubs on 1920's cars. --Scott
  21. Hi all, Could someone offer a few comments on the roadability and parts availability of a 1932 Buick Model 60? I know of one for sale, but am not a Buick man and have never driven one. Are they good road cars? (compared to, say, a 1938 which I have driven.) What is a comfortable cruising speed? Can an overdrive be installed? And how about parts availability? I know later Buicks have good avaiability of just about everything, but how about the earlier ones? Thanks, --Scott
  22. One car is close (150 miles on the train), the other car is pretty far. Far enough that I am beginning to doubt that I will be able to go see it, as appealing as it is. Can someone comment on the reliability of the column shift, a first for 1939? What is a comfortable cruising speed without overdrive? And are overdrives available for these cars so that I could install one later, or are they just about non-existant? Someone said that for 1939, the one I want is unique to that year. --Scott
  23. I've been concerned about using lap-only seat belts in any car. I'm no expert, but it seems to me that in a head-on crash, the lap belt will cause your body to "jackknife", throwing your chest against the steering column and head who-knows-where. That doesn't sound gentle. Didn't someone do a study years ago concluding that lap belts can be worse than no seat belt at all? I would think that if you want to install seat belts that the lap+shoulder is the only way to do it. Hard to do on an open car, though. --Scott
  24. The condition of the two cars is similar but not the same. They both are on the road and ready to drive. The 120 is low(lower) milage at 44,000 and allegedly quite a nice all original, well preserved and well taken care of car. Blled as needing nothing. The Super 8 is higher milage at 88,000 and has a few minor issues like upholstery, steering wheel, etc. Probably little problems associated with high milage will come up. But it is also billed as a daily driver, needing nothing. Neither car has had the engine rebuilt, to my knowledge. --Scott
  25. Hi. Can comeone tell me the differences between a Packard 120 and the Super Eight of 1939? Am I right that by 1939 they used the same bodies? Is the chassis the same except for the engine? If I have an opportunity to buy either one, any recommendations for someone who wants a reliable daily driver car? Thanks -- Scott
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