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scott12180

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Everything posted by scott12180

  1. Mystery solved. I met a bunch of vintage Packard people at a party last night and had it explained to me. The outer halves are supposed to clamp down hard on the inner disk. This isn't where relative motion is supposed to occur. An ohm meter tells the story. There is no conducting path between the hub and the outer ring of the disk. The hub is connected to the studs which hold the rubber buttons. The hub and those studs form a six-pointed star around which rubber is moulded. And that rubber holds the outer metal portion of the disk. That outer portion is clamped down hard onto the out
  2. I don't think you could feel wriggle looseness with your hands, but if the outer halves are clamped down tight against the rim of the inner disk, then why bother having twelve springs and rubber knobs? Seems that if it's clamped tight it would negate any function of the inner disk and turn the whole thing into a mini flywheel. A very helpful fellow offered to post my photographs --- Thanks Wayne ! Hopefully seeing them will help. --Scott
  3. Good point --- I should have posted a couple of photographs... So I just took two photos but I have no idea how to attach them to this note. It wants the "complete URL for the photo" Huh???? Anyway, The inner disk is bolted to the crankshaft. The outer disks (two pieces) are bolted around the inner disk such that the outer disk is free to move --- not rotate, but just wiggle to and fro in the direction of rotation. The inner disk holds the outer disks in place with rubber mounts and springs. It would be easy to see if I could post a photo. My problem is that when I bolt the outer disks
  4. I?m loosing my mind. I took apart the vibration damper (harmonic balancer) on my 1932 Standard Eight Packard because there was a knocking at road speeds characteristic of a frozen dampener. I cleaned out all the rust and freed up all parts. This dampener has twelve rubber buttons that sit into machined holes in the outer disk, along with twelve small springs. Now when I try to reassemble it, I notice that there is a gap of 0.040? between the two outer halves. This is because the rim of the inner friction disk that nests into the machined ridge on the two outer halves is about 0.040? THICKER
  5. I?m loosing my mind. I took apart the vibration damper (harmonic balancer) on my 1932 Standard Eight Packard because there was a knocking at road speeds characteristic of a frozen dampener. I cleaned out all the rust and freed up all parts. This dampener has twelve rubber buttons that sit into machined holes in the outer disk, along with twelve small springs. Now when I try to reassemble it, I notice that there is a gap of 0.040? between the two outer halves. This is because the rim of the inner friction disk that nests into the machined ridge on the two outer halves is about 0.040? THICKER
  6. I'll reiterate "Packin31" --- All you need to do is push the piston and rod assembly up until the wrist pin clears the top of the block, remove the wrist pin, pull the piston up through the top and remove the rod through the bottom. You do not need to remove the block from the crankcase nor remove the crankshaft. It's not all that hard. Reassembly is just the reverse --- rod up from the bottom, piston from the top, then insert the wrist pin. Well, it's not exactly easy, but it can be done and is how Packard intended it to be done. There was even a special tool in the form of a pin to help l
  7. Hello all, On the 1932 Packard Standard Eight the vibration dampener has a rubber inner disk with six cylindrical posts on each side. The posts nest into each half of the iron outer housing. I disassembled mine and cleaned out all the rust. The question is, should the inside be painted or coated with something to prevent rusting? Or should it all be left clean and bare (with the exception of the mating surface where the inner shaft must slide on the outer housing.) Thanks for any suggestions. --Scott
  8. Has anyone used "Automotive Friction" in Clackamas, Oregon to get their brake shoes relined? I have a 1926 236 Packard for which I need rear brakes. They sounded knowledgable on the telephone. Otherwise, any good recommendations? Thanks -- Scott
  9. Thanks for the explanation and great photos. That explains the 1920-1922 Bearcat. But the 1923 Stutz was now left hand drive. Four cylinder still offered on the 130 inch wheelbase, though, but the Bearcat was also up to a 130 inch wheelbase. Perhaps the better question is "was there a Bearcat offered in 1923"? Or by then was the two-seater ONLY called the "Roadster"? It is confusing because if the valuations stated in Bev Kimes book are at all realistic, there is a teriffic difference in value between the 1923 Stutz Bearcat and the 1923 Stutz Roadster. So that's why I'd like to know if yo
  10. But my inderstanding is that for 1923 the Bearcat acquired doors like the Roadster. That being, how do you tell the difference? --Scott
  11. Hi, For 1923, Bev Kimes book lists both a Roadster and Bearcat for 1923. What is the difference between a Bearcat and a Roadster for 1923? How do you tell by looking at the car? Thanks very much, -Scott
  12. Somebody ought to make a critical comment, so here goes: E-Bay makes it hard to get a good deal on parts because your audience is the whole world. For instance, I've lost lots parts to Australians who seem willing to pay any amount of money. It's driven up the price on so many good and needed parts. The other thing that really ticks me off is the whole "reserve price" auction. Especially with a whole car where you want to go look at it before you bid and traveling entails going some distance. Occasionally a seller will tell you his reserve, but most often not. I can't spend the money and
  13. Hello all, Can anyone recommend a source for 7.00 x 21" tires for my 1926 Packard? I bought Lesters last time and am not happy with them. They wear out very fast for one thing. I see Michelin and Dunlop at some of the larger tire companies for nearly $500 each. Needless to say, I'd like something more reasonably priced. Any sugestions appreciated. --Scott
  14. Hello all, Can anyone recommend a source for 7.00 x 21" tires for my 1926 Packard? I bought Lesters last time and am not happy with them. They wear out very fast for one thing. I see Michelin and Dunlop at some of the larger tire companies for nearly $500 each. Needless to say, I'd like something more reasonably priced. Any sugestions appreciated. --Scott
  15. Hi --- Could someone recommend a shipper to transport a 1929 Packard from the Missoula, Montana viscinity to upstate New York? Many carriers will not go to Montana due to weight restrictions on their trucks. And the thread about the problems with Passport/FedEx makes me not anxious to do business with them. (Although I asked them for a quote but have not heard back yet.) I would consider a private hauler with an enclosed trailer provided he came with good references. Thanks -- Scott
  16. Hi --- Could someone recommend a shipper to transport a 1929 Packard from the Missoula, Montana viscinity to upstate New York? Many carriers will not go to Montana due to weight restrictions on their trucks. And the thread about the problems with Passport/FedEx makes me not anxious to do business with them. (Although I asked them for a quote but have not heard back yet.) I would consider a private hauler with an enclosed trailer provided he came with good references. Thanks -- Scott
  17. Owning a gas station these days is a licence to print money. I refuse to believe that these guys are not making tons of cash --- from the local filling station to the distributor to the big oil companies. Case in point: There's a WalMart in Norwich, NY that has a gas station. My mother reported about two weeks ago that they were selling gasoline for $2.19 for regular. The corner station in her village of Greene, NY was over $3.00. . . . . Now, I'm SURE that WalMart is not selling gasoline at a loss. The profit margin on gasoline is just obscene. I wish we had an alternative. --Scott
  18. Perhaps one solution to the abuse of antique tags is to modify the age of a vehicle that can qualify for antique tags. A twenty-five year old car today really is not much different from a 2006 model, relative to a twenty-five year old car back in the 1950's when this rule was adopted. A better method might be to have a rolling qualification based on the percentage of total automobile history. What I mean is, say back in 1950 a 25 year old car qualified to be an antique by the AACA. That was roughly a car that was half as old as the automobile itself. In 1960, that logic would make a 1930
  19. A friend in the machine shop at work mentioned that he read (in Hemmings, I think) that legislation was introduced in Virginia to restrict the operation of antique and collector vehicles to a radius within 50 miles of the address where the car is registered. Any comments? Any truth to this? If true, what can possibly be the rationale or logic? Whenever I hear something like this I get really scared. Any time government thinks of a new way to take away more of our freedom, it is inevidable that it will spread. Today Virginia, tomorrow it's a federal law. --Scott 1926 Packard
  20. I believe that the 1932 Packard is a 901 Sedan, not a 902. Caveat Emptor
  21. How do you change read end gears? Do you mean find Century gears? And how easy is it to find them? Seems to me to be not so easy to do... And would a Buick Special have enough torque to handle higher speed gears in hilly country? --Scott
  22. Related to the "high speed gears" thread, I called "Gear Vendors" in California to inquire about their overdrives. They make an overdrive that can be installed in the torque tube, BUT if the torque tube is attached to the differential by rivets --- if it is not bolted on and not easilly removeable --- then it will not accommodate an overdrive. They do alot of Fords from the 1930's, but they think it won't work on Buick or other GM products. I don't own a car (yet) but am wondering about the overdrive option. Can someone tell me about how the torque tube is attached? Thanks --- Scott
  23. That's my point. There are a whole lot of 1930's Buick owners out there, and from what I can tell just about all of these cars would certainly benefit from an overdrive. I don't own a Buick just yet --- been looking for a good 1938 for a while now. Isn't there a Buick Club that could be "mobilized" to initiate a national project such as this? I'm sure Gear Vendors would be willing to work with a club on a large number of overdrive kits. Overdrives are great. I have one on a 1926 Packard (non-torque tube) and wouldn't be able to drive the car with a fraction of the enjoyment I get with
  24. Hi all, Has anyone out there undertaken the manufacture of high speed ring and pinion gears for pre-war Buicks (ie: 1938) ? I suppose these would be the same ratio as Buick Century gears. If no one has, it would be a good project. I would imagine there to be a good market for these. Others have done this with much success, such as Phil Bray's high speed gears for Packards. --Scott
  25. Here's the K&G wheel puller asembled. You screw it on the hub and insert the wedge into the slot on the end, which pushes against the axle end. Then as you drive the wedge, the puller tightens around the hub and pulls the wheel off. If you have one to sell or can help locate one, I'd appreciate hearing from you. --Scott
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