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scott12180

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Everything posted by scott12180

  1. Classic Car Club First Place #1787. Very handsome, properly restored car from a particularly solid and sound original. Dark green and midnight blue on black, proper tan broadcloth upholstery. New engine bearings, new waterpump by O&G, rebuilt Detroit Lubricator carburetor by "Old Carb Doc". Bedford blackwall tires with proper tread design. Looks good. Runs and drives very nicely. Plenty of power and pep. Heater for comfortable touring in all weather conditions. Needs nothing. Asking $55,000. Scott Dwyer dwyers@rpi.edu 518-276-8414 leave message. Photographs sent on request.
  2. I have a recently acquired 1932 Packard 902 Victoria Coupe. The top insert appears to be original and is in good shape. However, being original I am concerned that it is brittle and may be prone to leaks should I get caught in the rain. (And in this climate that will happen eventually.) Any suggestions for a top dressing or sealant that I can apply to waterproof the top? I am especially concerned about the edges where the top meets the body. I expect this would leak first. Thanks --- Scott
  3. I have a recently acquired 1932 Packard Victoria Coupe. The top insert appears to be original and is in good shape. However, being original I am concerned that it is brittle and may be prone to leaks should I get caught in the rain. (And that will happen eventually.) Any suggestions for a top dressing or sealant that I can apply to waterproof the top? I am specially concerned about the edges where the top meets the body. I expect this would leak first. Thanks --- Scott
  4. 1914 Series 4, 5 and 6 parts, TWO Eisemann EDAJ-6 magnetos. One complete and working (was checked over by magneto specialist but I never ran it on a car), the other is complete except for points. TWO cylinders. One whole, good and useable. The other has one broken ear. Neither appear to have cracks on the cylinder wall. Both need to be rebored to clean up. ONE complete spring, taper leaf as correct for S/4,5,6. Sell as one lot for $1500. Will ship for cost, deliver to Trek or you can pick up near Albany, NY. Scott Dwyer dwyers@rpi.edu
  5. While is is true that for sustained high speed driving insert rods are better than poured babbitt, I think that one reason why auto and engine companies don't use babbit connecting rods today is also due to the cost of manufacture. It should be alot cheaper to use insert bearings that don't need to be fitted. You avoid the costs of careful pouring or spinning, too. And all inserts and rods and crankshafts are interchangeable and a lot easier to replace than babbitt. I think that new babbitt is perfectly good for an antique car that is not stressed too hard. If you want to drive 70+ mph
  6. Quote: Virginia? Yes you can (buy regular tags), but you'll have to get an annual inspection and be at the mercy of inspectors who might not be familiar with your car. Same in New York, even if you have antique tags. But what we do is not to take your old car to just any garage for inspection, but to someone you know or someone who is reasonable or enthusiastic about old cars. And someone who knows that the law says that whatever worked on the car when new must be working today, nothing more. (Although most people install turn signals and brake lights for safety.) Yes, it's a pain, but with ma
  7. Reading through this thread, I have to wonder if the problem is only the use of antique tags on an antique car. Here in New York I've never registered an antique using antique tags. Just too many potential problems. Both my 1926 and 1932 Packards (and other pre-1930 cars I've owned) are registered using normal passenger tags. I can use my cars however I want, except for insurance restrictions. And if I get regular car insurance (liability only) I can drive my antiques anywhere, any time for any purpose. Do you have this option in Virginia and other states? -Scott
  8. Here's a story on Champion plugs. Recently I put a new set of Champion W-18 (or similar) into my 1926 Packard Eight. The car ran terribly. I could barely get it home from once around the block. I removed the plugs and found them to be wet with gasoline. But more importantly, one plug had it's electrode mashed together. What happened was that the Champion plugs are longer than AC or Blue Crown or similar plugs. The long plug was interfering with the VALVE. In other words, the exhaust valve had hit the bottom of the spark plug and closed the gap on one plug. I got lucky on the other sev
  9. Headlight lenses are now on E-Bay. Scheduled start Feb 14th 12:00 EST/9:00 PST for 7 days. Auction # 180085867601
  10. Is anyone interested in a pair of Bausch & Lomb 10-1/4" headlight lenses that fit Franklin Series 11 and maybe 12? These are the ones that are fluted and very thick at the bottom and gradually thin to the top. They are lightly hazed purple from exposure to UV light, but about as clear as I've seen. One lens is perfect. The other has four thumb-sized chips around the edge that should not effect the lens once it is mounted in the headlight. Not sure what they are worth. Any offers? --Scott
  11. Hi all, Could someone suggest how deep a scratch in a cylinder block (or head) must be before it might compromise a new head gasket? I have a 1932 Packard Standard Eight cylinder block that has several scratches, some of which appear deep. (How deep is deep??) I can catch them with my fingernail easily.) One scratch goes between combustion chambers. I will use copper head gasket sealer and a new copper head gasket, but will a scratch that deep eventually cause the gasket to fail? It appears that the scratches were there a long time, certainly before the studs were in place. The old head
  12. Well, Packard never made a 5th Series Eight, so the car isn't a 533 Eight. They jumped from the 4th Series Eight in 1928 to 6th Series Eight in 1929 to get the series designations in synch between the senior and junior cars. The car is a six cylinder without much doubt. It's a 1928 for all the reasons cited here, but as for model look at the length of the hood and the size of the headlamps. The 443, the Eight for 1928 as well as the Eight for 1927, had a VERY long hood and much larger headlamps to create a very imposing presense. The hood on the Eights for that vintage was a full ten inc
  13. Right --- I want blackwalls. And right again --- it's the size 700x19 that makes it so tough. Converting to a 20-inch rim would be pretty expensive, I think. Cheaper to run Excelsiors. I typically run nearly 5000 miles a year. There is a British "tyre" company which sells Michelin's in 700 x 19 as well as 700 x 21 for my 1926. They look even better than the Excelsior tires, but with the currency conversion would amount to $500 a tire. I'll live with Lesters for that much dough. (When I rode a late-model motorcycle, tires usually ran about $500 for the pair every 8000 miles. And that
  14. >>Since, I was the only one that Replied, I suppose you are talking to Me? If so, 'You are Very Welcome'. Gee, now that I look back, you were the only one who replied with an answer. Thanks ! Thanks, also, to Wayne for posting my photos. And yes, it was a good party --- 4 guys owning 1926 Eight Phaeton, 1926 Eight RHD Phaeton, 1927 Eight Roadster, 1932 902 Sedan, 1932 902 Victoria Coupe, 1936 120 Sedan, 1937 Twelve Sedan, 1938 Super 8 Sedan. Would have made a nice car show ! --Scott
  15. In regard to the price of Excelsior tires, it's not really the outright price that one can or cannot afford. If tire brand X costs $150 each and tire brand Y costs $300 but lasts twice as long or more, then it's false economy to keep buying cheap tires. Especially if the tread pattern on the expensive tires is preferable. Someone also commented that if I drive my car I should buy modern tires. Yes, I agree. But 700 x 19 tires are only available in vintage-style tires. :-( I thought about finding modern truck tires but none are available on 19-inch rims. My other car, the 1926, takes 7
  16. Happy New Year to all my fellow Classic owners ! I need a new set of tires for my 1932 902 Victoria Coupe. A set of Bedfords from the previous owner are on now but they are highly out of round, both side to side and up and down. (Rims are OK). They look great but are not good for driving. Coker offers Firestone in 700 x 19" as well as Excelsior in 700 x 19". Firestones are $143. The Excelsiors are $386 !! Of course the Excelsiors look alot better, but are they worth the extra money? Are they a better tire? For instance, I have Lesters on my 1926 236 Phaeton (700 x 21). They look awful but
  17. Happy New Year to all my fellow Packard owners ! I need a new set of tires for my 1932 902 Victoria Coupe. A set of Bedfords from the previous owner are on now but they are highly out of round, both side to side and up and down. (Rims are OK). They look great but are not good for driving. Coker offers Firestone in 700 x 19" as well as Excelsior in 700 x 19". Firestones are $143. The Excelsiors are $386 !! Of course the Excelsiors look alot better, but are they worth the extra money? Are they a better tire? For instance, I have Lesters on my 1926 236 Phaeton (700 x 21). They look awful but
  18. There is a company called "Gear Vendors" who makes planetary overdrive units for a wide variety of applications --- most of them modern stuff, but they do work for vintage and restoration applications, too. They specifically say that they have a unit that can be fitted into a torque tube. I have no idea of the cost. Of course, you need to give them a torque tube cadaver. My opinion is that if you really want to drive your car, and especially in hilly counrty, an overdrve is the best option. It preserves the low end grunt of the standard gears yet with the flick of a switch gives you a fourt
  19. You are correct. I learned that the outer rim of the inner disk must be clamped hard to the outer halves of the damper. Any relative motion which absorbs vibrations occurs not between the inner and outer disks, but within the rubber of the inner disk. See my reply in the Packard forum for a full explanation. Thanks --- Scott
  20. Mystery solved. I met a bunch of vintage Packard people at a party last night and had it explained to me. The outer halves are supposed to clamp down hard on the inner disk. This isn't where relative motion is supposed to occur. An ohm meter tells the story. There is no conducting path between the hub and the outer ring of the disk. The hub is connected to the studs which hold the rubber buttons. The hub and those studs form a six-pointed star around which rubber is moulded. And that rubber holds the outer metal portion of the disk. That outer portion is clamped down hard onto the out
  21. I don't think you could feel wriggle looseness with your hands, but if the outer halves are clamped down tight against the rim of the inner disk, then why bother having twelve springs and rubber knobs? Seems that if it's clamped tight it would negate any function of the inner disk and turn the whole thing into a mini flywheel. A very helpful fellow offered to post my photographs --- Thanks Wayne ! Hopefully seeing them will help. --Scott
  22. Good point --- I should have posted a couple of photographs... So I just took two photos but I have no idea how to attach them to this note. It wants the "complete URL for the photo" Huh???? Anyway, The inner disk is bolted to the crankshaft. The outer disks (two pieces) are bolted around the inner disk such that the outer disk is free to move --- not rotate, but just wiggle to and fro in the direction of rotation. The inner disk holds the outer disks in place with rubber mounts and springs. It would be easy to see if I could post a photo. My problem is that when I bolt the outer disks
  23. I?m loosing my mind. I took apart the vibration damper (harmonic balancer) on my 1932 Standard Eight Packard because there was a knocking at road speeds characteristic of a frozen dampener. I cleaned out all the rust and freed up all parts. This dampener has twelve rubber buttons that sit into machined holes in the outer disk, along with twelve small springs. Now when I try to reassemble it, I notice that there is a gap of 0.040? between the two outer halves. This is because the rim of the inner friction disk that nests into the machined ridge on the two outer halves is about 0.040? THICKER
  24. I?m loosing my mind. I took apart the vibration damper (harmonic balancer) on my 1932 Standard Eight Packard because there was a knocking at road speeds characteristic of a frozen dampener. I cleaned out all the rust and freed up all parts. This dampener has twelve rubber buttons that sit into machined holes in the outer disk, along with twelve small springs. Now when I try to reassemble it, I notice that there is a gap of 0.040? between the two outer halves. This is because the rim of the inner friction disk that nests into the machined ridge on the two outer halves is about 0.040? THICKER
  25. I'll reiterate "Packin31" --- All you need to do is push the piston and rod assembly up until the wrist pin clears the top of the block, remove the wrist pin, pull the piston up through the top and remove the rod through the bottom. You do not need to remove the block from the crankcase nor remove the crankshaft. It's not all that hard. Reassembly is just the reverse --- rod up from the bottom, piston from the top, then insert the wrist pin. Well, it's not exactly easy, but it can be done and is how Packard intended it to be done. There was even a special tool in the form of a pin to help l
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