Mark K

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About Mark K

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  1. I am the person who made the tutorials for both styles of gearshifts. Do an advanced search using my user name and you will find it at the top. I am sure there is a way to link that post to this one but I an not that computer savy. Good luck with the repairs. Mark
  2. I hope this tutorial helps. When I originally posted it I had 15 photos but the forum only allows 10 now. I can supply the extra photos if you would like them. If you have any questions, please let me know. Mark
  3. The following is a description for replacing the vinyl tape on the gearshift selector on the console. This is for 1990 and 1991 Buick Reattas (and Rivieras) only. 1988 & 1989’s are completely different and these procedures do not apply. I replaced the vinyl with leather, but any vinyl-like material will work as long as it is thin and flexible. I cannot be responsible for any damages that may occur during this procedure, USE AT YOUR OWN RISK (most members on this forum understand do-it-yourself procedures, but this is viewable on public domain and I don't know every person in the world ) When using any product, read and understand the instructions provided on the packaging, use only as indicated. I would like to sincerely thank Nic Walker who supplied the shift selector shown in the photos and also donated a damaged one for me to experiment with. I would not have been able to this without Nic’s help. He is a great asset to this forum. Materials Needed: soldering iron (optional), hobby knife, small flat-head screwdriver, contact cement & contact cement thinner. wooden board (1 x 4 about 15 inches long works well), small nails, 2 part glue such as JB weld, clamp, block of wood (a 1X4 1 3/8“ wide), 1” long piece of 3/4“ hard copper tubing, an improvised tool to re-melt plastic rivets, hot glue gun (optional). This procedure starts with the gearshift selector out of the car. Fig. 1 Melting the plastic rivets Step 1 Disassemble the gearshift selector The selector is held together by plastic rivets that are melted in place. There are two methods for disassembly: Melting them or cutting them. I prefer the first method as it is neater and faster. To melt: Place your hot soldering iron on the center of the rivet while wedging a small flat screwdriver between the two sections. As the rivet begins to melt separate the sections. Work quickly so you do not melt anything but the rivet. To cut: Insert hobby knife under head of rivet, using a rocking motion, cut head off. Separate the top of the gearshift selector from the bottom. Remove the red slider from the metal tape (see figure 2). Fig. 2 Disassembled shift selector Step 2 Remove Shifter Escutcheon The escutcheon that surrounds the shifter shaft must be removed in order to remove the metal tape. To accomplish this you must remove the outer retaining ring on the bottom side of the escutcheon. This is shown with red arrows in figure 3. Fig. 3 Escutcheon detail First, I used my hobby knife to make a series of vertical cuts in the outer ring (figure 5), then I break the ring with a small screwdriver (figure 6). It helps to support the top of the escutcheon by placing it on a small piece of wood held in a vice. When the outer ring is removed, the escutcheon will pull out from the top. You can now remove the metal tape from the shift selector. Simply pull it out from either end. Be careful, the edges are very sharp (I found out the hard way). Gloves are recommended. Fig. 4 Cutting the escutcheon ring Fig. 5 Breaking the escutcheon ring Fig. 6 Tape mounted on board Step 3 Mount the metal tape on a board Use a nail on each end. There is a hole on one end and punch a hole with the nail on the other end. Scribe the edge of the vinyl so you can tell where to put the new material. Step 4 Remove old vinyl I peeled most of it off by hand then scraped the rest with my fingernail. Clean the old adhesive a with solvent such as contact cement thinner. BE SURE TO READ AND FOLLOW THE MANUFACTURER’S INSTRUCTIONS. USE IN A WELL VENTILATED AREA. Step 5 Cut new material Cut your leather or vinyl 1 1/4 inches wide by 20 inches long. It doesn't need to be quite that long. The leather I used was only 12 inches and that is plenty long. The original is 20” Step 6 Apply Contact adhesive Place masking tape along your scribed lines to keep the glue off the edges. Apply one coat of contact adhesive to the metal tape and two coats to the leather (vinyl). Let the first coat dry first. BE SURE TO READ AND FOLLOW THE MANUFACTURER’S INSTRUCTIONS. USE IN A WELL VENTILATED AREA. When both surfaces are dry, carefully press the leather to the metal tape. Make sure it is in the correct position because once it is applied you cannot move it. Step 7 Re-install metal tape. Guide it through the groves. You may have to bend the end upward so it doesn’t catch. The two small holes in the tape, for the red slider, go on the left hand side, closest to the blue gel. Re-bend the end of the metal tape so it coils properly. Cut the leather covering the shifter hole with an Xacto knife. Fig. 7 New retaining washer, (left) escutcheon (right) Fig. 8 Retaining washer positioned on escutcheon Step 8 Replace Retaining Washer To properly reassemble the escutcheon a new retaining ring must be installed. I purchased a plumbing washer at my local hardware store to serve this purpose (figure 8). It is made out of fiber and has an inside diameter of 11/16”, an outside diameter if 7/8”, and a thickness of app. 3/64”. The inside diameter is the most critical. I had to enlarge the inside diameter slightly with hobby knife to get it to seat properly. It needs to seat at the bottom of the lip on the escutcheon (figure 9). It also must be trimmed on two sides to fit in the gearshift housing. Figs. 9 Clamping Escutcheon Step 9 Glue Escutcheon & Retaining Washer First insert the escutcheon into the hole in the metal tape, coat the lip of the escutcheon with 2-part adhesive then place the retaining washer on the other side. Put the small 1X4 on top of the escutcheon and the copper pipe on the retaining washer (figure 9). Clamp and let sit overnight. Step 10 Reassemble Assemble the upper (black) and lower (white) halves of the shift selector by pressing them together and making sure all the rivets are seated in their corresponding holesIf you cut the melt-rivets in disassemble, you have the glue the upper and lower sections together. I would suggest using a low-strength hot glue adhesive. This is important if you ever want to disassemble it again. Apply the glue in about 2 places per side, work quickly and clamp to get a good bond. If you melted the melt rivets you have to re-melt them. I fabricated a tool for this purpose. It is simply a piece of 3/8 inch round brass stock silver-soldered to a 1/8th inch steel shaft. I the placed the shaft in a small needle file handle. The end of the brass stock has a small indentation (the dark spot in the photo). If you do not want to do any fabricating, you could use a bolt, metal rod, or just about any other metal object as long as it can be insulated to prevent burning your hand. Fig. 10 Re-melting the Rivets To use the tool simply heat it with a torch until it is hot enough to melt the plastic and press it on each rivet until it melts, securing the two parts of the shifter assembly. See figure 15. Be sure not to heat the tool too much and melt the lower (white) section of the shifter assembly. Once the two halves of the shift selector are assembled, it is ready to be installed into the car.
  4. I have posted the tutorial for the '90-'91 shifter tape but, I believe, the photos went away with the forum format change. It is a bit harder to replace because the unit does not screw together as in the '88-'89 but still is not hard. I will try to re-post it. Please be patient I am not entirely used to this new format and it may take me a bit of time. Mark
  5. Going back to the origins of this post, at the Reatta Reuinion in Lansing a few years ago I asked Lynn Salata what other names were considered for the Reatta and she gave me three different names besides Reatta. The only one I can remember is Spectrum. I wish I could remember the other two. If someone can contact Lynn I am sure she could shed some light on this subject. Mark
  6. Dustin's mother lived down the block from me. In fact she fell in love with mine and had to have one of her own. I can tell you this is an extremely nice Reatta. I am not a judge, but at Nationals, I believe all it would take to receive at least a silver award (if not gold) would be a good detailing. It is extremely original and very close to like new, never been abused and always pampered. When Donn purchase the car it had the original tires but they have been replaced since. The grey stem caps have been retained (in fact one was missing and I supplied her with a correct replacement). I just love the color combination, the grey interior is just beautiful. The seats are the standard seats and the pin stripe is black. I really don't think you will find a nicer coupe around. I would have jumped at this one if I didn't have a convertible already.
  7. I painted the black parts of my emblems earlier this summer. The rear emblem is held on with speed nuts. You have to remove the lower black valance panel to access the nuts and then you can remove the nuts with a socket wrench, I forget which size, 10mm maybe. The side emblems are attaches to the side molding with push nuts. You have to remove the side molding first. It is held on, I believe, with one or two screws the you have to slide it to disengage the clips that hold it on. I would suggest getting new push nuts because it is next to impossible to get them off in one piece. I used a semi-gloss spray paint to paint the emblems. I coated the entire emblem then when the paint was dry I took a rag and wrapped it around a small block of wood, soaked the rag with lacquer thinner and wiped the paint off the surface of the emblem. The emblems came out like new. Be sure to clean the emblems completely before you spray them or the paint will not adhere to the chrome. Mark
  8. You can't sew it because the velcro is attached to metal tabs on the top frame. I have had luck with 3M weatherstrip adhesive. To make it hold better I cut new velcro about twice the length of the metal tabs and wrapped it all the way around the tab. Make sure you buy the correct type of velcro: the kind with the short, smooth "hooks" doesn't stick to the back side of the headliner flaps as well as the type with the longer, smaller "hooks". Mark
  9. Red brake light is on, be careful.
  10. We are leaving Southern MN Monday morning, not going through Kansas though. I35 south to Des Moines, I80 West. Hope to reach North Platte NE sometime late afternoon and spend the night there. On to CS Tuesday morning. Anybody else going this way? Mark
  11. I am not sure why all of the photos did not work. I went back to the original post and only about 3 photos showed up. There was nothing I could do to get them to show up on the previous post. Here they are now: Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 I will try to get all of the photos on the original post as soon as I can. Mark
  12. The following is a description for replacing the vinyl tape on the gearshift selector on the console. This is for 1990 and 1991 Buick Reattas (and Rivieras) only. 1988 & 1989?s are completely different and these procedures do not apply. I replaced the vinyl with leather, but any vinyl-like material will work as long as it is thin and flexible. I cannot be responsible for any damages that may occur during this procedure, USE AT YOUR OWN RISK (most members on this forum understand do-it-yourself procedures, but this is viewable on public domain and I don't know every person in the world ) When using any product, read and understand the instructions provided on the packaging, use only as indicated. I would like to sincerely thank Nic Walker who supplied the shift selector shown in the photos and also donated a damaged one for me to experiment with. I would not have been able to this without Nic?s help. He is a great asset to this forum. Materials Needed: soldering iron (optional), hobby knife, small flat-head screwdriver, contact cement & contact cement thinner. wooden board (1 x 4 about 15 inches long works well), small nails, 2 part glue such as JB weld, clamp, block of wood (a 1X4 1 3/8? wide), 1? long piece of 3/4? hard copper tubing, an improvised tool to re-melt plastic rivets, hot glue gun (optional). This procedure starts with the gearshift selector out of the car. There is an excellent tutorial on removing the selector here: http://forums.aaca.org/showflat.php?Cat=...true#Post391258 Step 1 Disassemble the gearshift selector The selector is held together by plastic rivets that are melted in place. There are two methods for disassembly: Melting them or cutting them. I prefer the first method as it is neater and faster. To melt: Place your hot soldering iron on the center of the rivet while wedging a small flat screwdriver between the two sections. As the rivet begins to melt separate the sections. Work quickly so you do not melt anything but the rivet. To cut: Insert hobby knife under head of rivet, using a rocking motion, cut head off. Separate the top of the gearshift selector from the bottom. Remove the red slider from the metal tape (see figure 3). Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Step 2 Remove Shifter Escutcheon The escutcheon that surrounds the shifter shaft must be removed in order to remove the metal tape. To accomplish this you must remove the outer retaining ring on the bottom side of the escutcheon. This is shown with red arrows in figure 4. Figure 4 First, I used my hobby knife to make a series of vertical cuts in the outer ring (figure 5), then I break the ring with a small screwdriver (figure 6). It helps to support the top of the escutcheon by placing it on a small piece of wood held in a vice. When the outer ring is removed, the escutcheon will pull out from the top. You can now remove the metal tape from the shift selector. Simply pull it out from either end. Be careful, the edges are very sharp (I found out the hard way). Gloves are recommended. Figure 5 Figure 6 Step 3 Mount the metal tape on a board Use a nail on each end. There is a hole on one end and punch a hole with the nail on the other end. Scribe the edge of the vinyl so you can tell where to put the new material. Figure 7 Step 4 Remove old vinyl I peeled most of it off by hand then scraped the rest with my fingernail. Clean the old adhesive a with solvent such as contact cement thinner. BE SURE TO READ AND FOLLOW THE MANUFACTURER?S INSTRUCTIONS. USE IN A WELL VENTILATED AREA Step 5 Cut new material Cut your leather or vinyl 1 1/4 inches wide by 20 inches long. It doesn't need to be quite that long. The leather I used was only 12 inches and that is plenty long. The original is 20? Step 6 Apply contact adhesive Place masking tape along your scribed lines to keep the glue off the edges. Apply one coat of contact adhesive to the metal tape and two coats to the leather (vinyl). Let the first coat dry first. BE SURE TO READ AND FOLLOW THE MANUFACTURER?S INSTRUCTIONS. USE IN A WELL VENTILATED AREA. When both surfaces are dry, carefully press the leather to the metal tape. Make sure it is in the correct position because once it is applied you cannot move it. Step 7 Re-install metal tape. Guide it through the groves. You may have to bend the end upward so it doesn?t catch. The two small holes in the tape, for the red slider, go on the left hand side, closest to the blue gel. Re-bend the end of the metal tape so it coils properly. Cut the leather covering the shifter hole with an Xacto knife. Step 8 Replace Retaining Washer To properly reassemble the escutcheon a new retaining ring must be installed. I purchased a plumbing washer at my local hardware store to serve this purpose (figure 8). It is made out of fiber and has an inside diameter of 11/16?, an outside diameter if 7/8?, and a thickness of app. 3/64?. The inside diameter is the most critical. I had to enlarge the inside diameter slightly with hobby knife to get it to seat properly. It needs to seat at the bottom of the lip on the escutcheon (figure 9). It also must be trimmed on two sides to fit in the gearshift housing (figure 10) Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Step 9 Glue Escutcheon & Retaining Washer First insert the escutcheon into the hole in the metal tape, coat the lip of the escutcheon with 2-part adhesive then place the retaining washer on the other side. Put the small 1X4 on top of the escutcheon (figure11) and the copper pipe on the retaining washer (figure 12). Clamp and let sit overnight. [img:center]http://i85.photobucket.com/albums/k79/mkuklok/IMG_L4127InClamp2.jpg Figure 11 Figure 12 Step 10 Reassemble Assemble the upper (black) and lower (white) halves of the shift selector by pressing them together and making sure all the rivets are seated in their corresponding holes If you cut the melt-rivets in disassemble, you have the glue the upper and lower sections together. I would suggest using a low-strength hot glue adhesive. This is important if you ever want to disassemble it again. Apply the glue in about 2 places per side, work quickly and clamp to get a good bond. If you melted the melt rivets you have to re-melt them. I fabricated a tool for this purpose. It is simply a piece of 3/8 inch round brass stock silver-soldered to a 1/8th inch steel shaft. I the placed the shaft in a small needle file handle. The end of the brass stock has a small indentation (the dark spot in the photo). If you do not want to do any fabricating, you could use a bolt, metal rod, or just about any other metal object as long as it can be insulated to prevent burning your hand. Figure 13 Figure 14 Fig. 15 Re-melting the Rivets To use the tool simply heat it with a torch until it is hot enough to melt the plastic and press it on each rivet until it melts, securing the two parts of the shifter assembly. See figure 15. Be sure not to heat the tool too much and melt the lower (white) section of the shifter assembly. Figure 15 Once the two halves of the shift selector are assembled, it is ready to be installed into the car. Top Reply Quote Quick Reply Quick Quote Notify Email Post
  13. I am listing this for my neighbor Donna who is selling because of health issues. It is extremely nice with low miles and a somewhat unusual color combination. She has owned it for a little over 3 years. It was previously owned by Steve Olson (I believe)in the Twin Cities so some of you my have seen it before. You may contact Donna directly for more info, I have included her phone number. Year: 1990 Coupe Mileage: 38676 Considered Correct? (Y) Location: Owatonna Minnesota Title: Clear Any Accident History? No Asking Price: $ 8500.00 Willing to take trade No Exterior Color: Red Interior Color: Gray Paint Original? Yes Paint Condition? Good to Excellent Belt & Bumper Molding Color: Black Body Dents: No If Y where__________________ Body Rust: No If Y where__________________ Windshield Chipped or Cracked? No If Y to what extent? Vent Glass Intact? Yes If N please describe which one is damaged and how damaged. Rubber surround molding for windshield condition? Excellent (Coupe only) Rubber surround molding for rear window condition? Excellent Out Side Mirrors Intact? Yes Headlight Motors Function Correctly? Yes Tail Light Lens: Cloudy (Convertable only) Convertable Top Material: (Vinyl or Cloth) Convertable Top Color? Convertable Top Condition? (Excellent/Good/Fair/Poor) Please describe any flaws or problems with the convertible top. Interior Original? Yes 16 Way Seats? No Works (Y/N) Suede bolsters? (88 only) Seat Condition? Excellent Drivers interior door panel condition? Excellent Passengers interior door panel condition? Excellent Center console top armrest condition? Excellent Door weather stripping condition? Good Headliner Condition? Excellent Carpet Condition? Excellent Original Floor Mats: Yes Floor Mat Condition: Excellent Condition of Steering Wheel Leather: Good Sun Roof? No Functional Keyless Entry? Yes Both Remotes? Yes Problems with Electronic Dash items? No If Y describe problems: Power Windows Work Correctly? Yes Power Seats Work Correctly? Yes Power Door Locks Work Correctly? Yes Power Antenna Work Correctly? Yes Original Sound System? Yes Factory CD Player? (90-91 only) No Sound System Fully Functional? Yes If N what are the problems (i.e. tape player, CD, speakers, noise): Aftermarket Sound System Equipment? No If Y describe: A/C Functional? Yes If N describe problem: Has the A/C been converted from R12 to R134A? No Does the suspension require any attention? No If Y describe what is needed Tire Brand: ? Remaining Tread: New in 2007 Are All Tires Matched? Yes Factory Wheels? Yes If N describe the non stock wheel Factory Wheel Center Caps Condition: Excellent Missing Caps? No Any Brake Components Replaced? No If Y describe the part(s) replaced and when? Last Time Brake System Was Flushed? June 2008 Original Engine? Yes If N when replaced and how many miles on replacement? Does Engine require attention? No If Y what needs to be done. When was last tune up? Does the engine, cooling system, power steering, or brake system leak any fluids? Yes-Power Steering If Y describe in detail what is leaking, to what extent. How often do you change the oil? Yearly Original Transmission? Yes If N when replaced and how many miles on replacement? Original Transmission Rebuilt? No If Y when and how many miles ago? Does Transmission require attention? No If Y what needs to be done? When was last Transmission Service? Any Transmission Leaks? No If Y to what extent? Have CV joints been replaced? No If Y when and how many miles ago? I have most receipts for this vehicle's service history. (or, for example I have (all/most/some/no) receipts for service for the last 5 years Does the car have the owners manual portfolio? Yes For 90/91 Reattas only, does the owners manual portfolio contain: Craftsmen?s Log Yes Tire gauge Yes Flashlight Yes Buick Road Atlas Yes In General, What items need attention? My Reatta Drives: Excellent I am the 3rd owner of this Reatta. I have owned this Reatta for 3 Years Contact Donna at 507-573-1439
  14. Nic, The tutorial you are refering to is this: Are Your Window Switches Loose? Thanks for the kind words, let me know if you have any questions. Mark
  15. Here is a photo of the plastic key that came with my '90 portfolio. It appears that it is a Buick item and not Reatta specific. It only has the door key because the ignition key used a resister (PASS key system)in the key, so other Buicks that used the PASS key system might have used this plastic key. Mark Kuklok