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JPC

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  1. Do you still have the tail light housings?
  2. If you find one and a dealer that will fill the order sign me up for one also.
  3. I have had this car since 1987 and have used it as a daily driver for the past 18 Years. It has seen better days. Will be getting rid of it by the end of the month. Located in central Connecticut has new drivers side fender and 22 Gal fuel tank. Currently not running. If anyone is interested make an offer by email to: buickyank@sbcglobal.net The 73 GS is based on the Century Model here is link to picture: http://www.buickclub.org/Yankee/1973GS.jpg
  4. JPC

    BUICK FONT

    Anyone ever come across this font for download? I found a font called Koloss which is real close but you have to pay for it at Font.com. I need to use it once so I can see paying for it if it was available some where else for free. I'd appreciate any leads to this.
  5. JPC

    BUICK FONT

    IN the past I had seen a post about downloading the Buick style font for your computer. Tried to search for it but did not find it. Anyone know where this was downloaded from?
  6. I think this is great. Notice the rivet treatment, total of 12 exhaust ports and the no step label painted on the front bumper and rear quarter. I hope at the fuel door it reads "105 Octane only" Only change I would make is to move the Eyes up over the front exhaust port and paint the 30's style US emblem of blue circle with white star and red center bulls eye. I would rather see this than know that it went to a crusher.
  7. I would agree with carb float level. It would idle and run fine but on fast accel if the level is low the fuel will pool at the back of the bowl starving the jets. With no one around you try the fast acceleration and at the point where it boggs hold your throttle position and give a jamb on the brakes. If the engine comes back to life not enough fuel in the bowl. If you can rev it in the driveway without the rpm dropping off you have enough fuel pressure at the carb. Could also be the pickup inside the fuel tank. Try the easy stuff first, new fuel filter? Some have a backflow valve ( little rubber flap ) and when they screw up or are installed backwards you get a staring fuel condition. Good luck and use caution when work with fuel system problems.
  8. I know this is the buick site but I wonder if anyone has any ideas on this issue I'm have with my Chevy. I have a stock 87 SS Monte for my wife that the electronic ignition module keeps burning up on. In the last 6 years its been replaced 8 times. Ive tried a new coil, new cap and rotor, new pick up coil, new wires, new ground straps from head to firewall and still no luck in getting this problem licked. Checked distributor for shorts or faulty ground as shown in shop manual but found no faults. Last time it happened I put in a new distributor and thought this cured the issue but it happened again last month. I know this is not an inherant problem with these car because I have the same ignition in my car and it still has the original Delco part installed. The Shop manual give diagnostics to check if it works but no mention of what to do if the module keeps going dead. Any ideas on what to check clean or fix would be helpful as I'm at a lose as to what to try next.
  9. The 40/Special-60/Century Series use the 3 piece rear windows while the 50/Super-70/Roadmaster use the wrap around rear windows. I believe only the late spring release of the 75 Series Roadmasters had the chrome strip over the roof ridge that continues over the wrap around windows and down onto the trunk lid. This made it appear that the 75 series had a three piece rear window.
  10. JPC

    Ignition

    Ronvb, Original dist. was in car when this problem started. Each new module was installed with the silicone paste beneath to disipate heat. By the time it had burned 6 modules I had replaced all other parts of the Ignition, Cap, Rotor, Pick up Coil, Ignition Coil and feed wire. The only peice left was the Dist. housing which I had checked for open or shorts according to the shop manual but could find no problems. At that point I figured maybe the problem only occured while the distrbutor was in motion and short could not be found while bench testing. Replacement was a remanufactured item with like part # of original which is cast aluminum housing with an aluminum base plate. Any other ideas as to what might cause this and how to prevent burn out of module?
  11. JPC

    Ignition

    I have a stock 87 SS Monte for my wife that the electronic ignition module keeps burning up on. In the last 6 years its been replaced 8 times. Ive tried a new coil, new cap and rotor, new pick up coil, new wires, new ground straps from head to firewall and still no luck in getting this problem licked. Checked distributor for shorts or faulty ground as show in shop manual but found no faults. Last time it happened I put in a new distributor and thought this cured the issue but it happened again last week. I know this is not an inherant problem with these car because I have the same ignition in my car and it still has the original Delco part installed. The Shop manual give diagnostics to check if it works but no mention of what to do if the module keeps going dead. Any ideas on what to check clean of fix would be helpful as I'm at a lose as to what to try next.
  12. The issue with Buick V8 after the nail heads is that the oil pump is not in the oil pan but on your timing cover, external to the engine. I always felt this was a great feature in that if you needed to service it you just took the thing off. No removing engine mounts, hoisting engine or removing oil pans for service. One draw back is that from the screen to the pump is now quite the distance compared to other blocks. Another condition is that the pump housing is aluminum and if you spin it dry with a drill you would probably grind the main pump gear right into the plate creating to much clearance for the thing to work correctly. Packing the pump with vaseline gives a big suction on that first rev that primes the pump. It is also petroleum based and does not need to be warm to dissolve, so as the oil gets there it mixes quite readily. If you assemble the oil pump first you need to be careful not to spin it to much when trying to get the distributor in, as you will lose the prime. I found it easier to put the distributor in first and then put the oil pump together, packed with vaseline and then put the oil pump cover on. There are also buick oil pump repair kits available that come with a tool steel base plate and longer screws, this is a good fix and is more durable than the aluminum plate. If you plan to race or run your engine hard I would recommend using the steel plate. Another issue with these front mounted pumps is that your oil filter is horizontal or almost and when the engine is turned off it will drain back into the oil pan, leaving the filter and pump almost empty. Take a good look at the filter you buy and make sure that you can see the rubber back flow valve through the holes on the outside rim. Even AC had taken them out of the PF24 for a while, probably to save a few pennies on their part. I've only done this three times with a buick but never had any problems with oil pressure. All three were redone between 100,000 - 125,000 mile and ran strong with over 220,000 miles on them. Buick really had a better idea here I wish these engines were still made, it was a breeze to work on the 350. I swear at chevy engineering every time I have to work on my 305.
  13. When I first started driving, 1979 gas had shot up in price to $1.59 and it was slowly climbing due largely to OPEC policy. Gasahol was introduced and the price was around 20 cent per gallon less than gas. A lot of people were scared to use it because they were hearing stories about it ruining your engine. True that switching to alcohol will make an engine run lean and ther-fore you had to retune the carb for a richer mixture. Any car with an oxygen sensor is equiped to adjust the air fuel mixture so that it does not run to rich or lean. When this was realised and everyone began to use gasahol the price of gas began to drop down to the same level, and eventually lower, everone switched back to using straight gas because you get better mileage. Its the old supply and demand thing in action. But the reason for them refering to this as oxygenated fuel instead of gasahol is that the consumer might have expected the price of gasahol to be cheaper. It was cheaper to produce 20 years ago why is this not true today? If anything the stations in New England area actually up there price during the winter months like as if they are giving us something special.
  14. Lets get back to the original topic and my feelings on that. Whats in a name? I know I'm in a minority when I say I do not care what you call it or whom I might impress in conversation by saying yes thats my Lexus,Jag or Audi, ( I have an inny but thats beside the point ). To me it is more important what it is and not what its called. If GM ( Hopefully Buick )would build a car that I liked they could call it a Turd and I would still buy it. How many have asked about where they can get a Blackhawk? Now what would I want my dream car to be? How about big enought to seat four adults in comfort, Rear wheel Drive, small efficent V8 Power plant, 4 speed automatic with TCL and AC as a minimum with options for power locks, power windows, 4 speaker stereo and an alarm system. Options beyond that I just can not see as they only add complexity and cost to a vehicle not only at the factory but at the service end also. It could be a 4 door Sedan as long as they made it look good or a 2 coupe if the door is large enough that the person getting in the back seat is not required to be an acrobat. The bean counters would not build my kind of car because they would claim it cost to much to produce yet is this not the platform of most high end luxury vehicles today. They told the public that we needed front wheel drive for superior traction but now they tell you you need an SUV. Sad to say the only new car in 20 years I've had any interst in has been the Magnum, I just dont know if i'd be comfortable in a car named after a gun. How about Buick, build me a wagon with some retro styling! Then give it a name that gets it heritage from your stable. Invicta, Wildcat, Skylark, Century, Regal, Roadmaster, Super, Special, Lesabre, GN, GSX and other great names that went with the cars we love. My first and best car was a 70 Skylark 4 door sedan and if this were built today, and called it the Turd, I would not hesitate to buy one now even without all the new modern improvements that are available today as this was a strong, durable, well built car. I remember reading a car rag back in 84 where they praise the heck out of an accord and the trashed the Regal and is sister car the Grand National. Today how many of those accords are in the crusher compaired to the number of GN's and T Types that people save becuase they like them. I guess what I want is a car that I would like today and would be my classic later on in its life. That does not happen with many of todays cars, they are just transportation that get used up and discarded. I know there are others who expressed some of the same stats I have as suggested for a new vehicle. My hope is such a car will be built and that they use one of the Buick names on it. If not I will be the proud owner of a Turd.
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