Dave Wyatt

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Everything posted by Dave Wyatt

  1. On my son's 66 Fairlane, I have found the semi gloss black all the way to the rear of the car. It is/was a southern car and some parts were pretty well preserved. We found the paint under peeling OEM sound deadener.
  2. Those use hydraulic lifters and are set at zero valve lash. Snug them down until quiet and give them 1/2 turn extra. Some like less than 1/2 and others like more, but 1/2 should do the job. Pick up a Motors manual for exact specs.
  3. Most likely it was a green 51 Chevy 4 door. My oldest son came home in a almost new 81 Gran Prix. He likes Pontiacs and luxury. Son number two came home in my 70 4-4-2. He likes Oldsmobiles, and speed.
  4. It was late summer 1984. I had just gotten the 4-4-2 back on the road after a 7 year hibernation. The wife and I took another couple with us to a local car show in Terre Haute IN. While there I ran into a fellow I knew from back in the day, with his '71 4-4-2. As usual his mouth was running a mile a minute about how he had beaten my Olds back then. I didn't say a lot at the time, but managed to get my revenge later. On our way home another friend was following me in his 66 Mustang. The plan was to head north a few miles and hit a favorite pizza place. Well, we did, but not before some revenge was extracted. We came up to the next to the last stoplight in town. I am in the far right lane, and lo and behold, in the far left was my old nemesis in his 4-4-2. Between us was some kid in a rusty Camaro that was running on 7 cylinders. We paid no attention to him, but did look at each other and nod. The light went green and the race was on. The other 4-4-2 was an automatic and he got out on me. As soon as I got the tires to hook, I was gaining ground. I caught up in 3rd, hit 4th and walked on by. My car had four of us in it, while the other Olds had only the driver. Yeah, I had bragging rights now. Luckily the last light was green as we got to it. We were going way too fast in a 40 mph zone, but it had to be done. And the kid in the Camaro? My buddy in the Mustang reported that the Camaro driver's head about spun off his shoulders as the two Oldsmobiles roared out of sight. He had no clue as to what was about to happen, and got the surpise of his life as we both blasted away from the light.
  5. If I still had my 54 Chevy, I would be able to store most of it in a shoe box by now. That poor rusty thing was disolving before my eyes in 1971. It didn't need a garage, it needed a dutpan and a broom. I am glad to know that some have managed to hang on to their first cars. I do still have car #4 that I bought in '73.
  6. I've always said that some people should be restricted to new cars. In spite of the fact that many folks have an older car, some of those have no business owning them. You really need to be a car person to get along with one and enjoy it.
  7. If you have overfilled the radiator, it will act like it is overheating. You have to leave some air in the top of the tank for expansion, otherwise it push water out the overflow when it gets warm.
  8. Yeah, but you have to like to drive what you end up buying. That's why we ended up in a VW. I looked at what Ford and GM had to offer, and drove quite a few, but the VW was our choice. I don't regret it one bit. I did buy a Ford truck at the same time, but it was a similar situation. I did not like the other offerings for trucks. I think the domestic makers need to make cars enjoyable to drive again.
  9. Got to the Olds section and ask. 350's are easy to come by. In fact, if you are close to western Indiana, I've got one available right now. We went with a 455 in my son's 85 Cutlass and no longer need the 350. And a 455 would be another option, with only minor mods needed.
  10. All this talk of Hershey triggered a fond memory. It was back in the mid 70's and my first trip to the Hoosier auto show and swap meet, at the 500 track in Indy. The wife and I had worn ourselves out in the swap area and were finally checking out cars on the show field. We were looking at a row of early Thunderbirds when we came upon one car with a few people around it. One of those people in particular, was some guy in a Corvette T- shirt, running his mouth a mile a minute, much to the dismay of the T-bird owner. The vette guy was offering all types of obviously unneeded suggestions on how to display the car. Finaly he suggested, covering the chrome air filter housing with a shop rag, so the sun did not reflect back and burn a hole in the hood. "That's how we do it on our Corvettes," he finished. With that, the T-bird owner looked at him and said, <span style="font-weight: bold">"We don't play with plastic toys."</span> There was much smirking and even a giggle or two from the rest of us, but the vette guy just walked away with his head hung low.
  11. Put an Olds 350 in it, it is a true bolt in. Anything else is going to require various engine specific brackets, and possibly some fuel line and electrical re-routing.
  12. Turning it in should help.
  13. These are the one's that got me interested in Oldsmobiles as a kid. Just something about those bullet tail lights that look so good. Then you move to the inside and see that beautilful dash. I think Olds had the best designs of the 50's, and even on into the 60's. Beautilful car, someday I will own one.
  14. After a succesful Jr Dragster stint, Mike finally turned 16 and got his license. So it was only natural that I started him out racing in the High School class, in my 4 speed 4-4-2. It had some kind of effect on him, as he prefers older cars to this day. And now, he has his own old car project.
  15. Test fit the carpet over the holes before making any cuts, then mark with chalk. Put seat belt bolts and such back in the car, and feel for the lumps they make to find reference points. It's really pretty simple, just take your time.
  16. I'll add my $.02 here. Take it easy on the the options. Glenn is correct, fully loaded cars were very rare. Dad had a loaded 61 Bonneville, but is was a special ordered by the original buyer. Most cars were somewhere in between loaded and stripped, with the largest percentage closer to the stripped group. At one time, I had a used OAI hood and rear spoiler that I was going to put on my 4-4-2. After thinking about it, I sold those parts and left the car as it was built. Then in 1997 in Lansing, I had one of only two 1970 4 speed cars on display, that did not have an OAI hood. I kind of liked that. And what Glenn said about the W-30's and GTO's is correct, too many are way over optioned. I am still searching for the elusive 4 barrell equipped GTO, I think they made two or three
  17. I put DOT 5 in my 4-4-2, back in 1984, and the brakes are still working fine. I have added a little fluid over the years, but very little.
  18. I just got my new catalog from these folks http://www.speedwaymotors.com/ and noticed they had a fair amount of engine swap mounts. Check them out.
  19. I use the NAPA gold on all our vehicles. I don't know the number for the Olds off hand, but they can look it up.
  20. I use the NAPA gold on all our vehicles. I don't know the number for the Olds off hand, but they can look it up.
  21. Rear seat belts for that car have the larger buckle needed for the front shoulder belts. They may not be "correct", but they will work.
  22. Rear seat belts for that car have the larger buckle needed for the front shoulder belts. They may not be "correct", but they will work.
  23. Check out this link, then scroll down to see the custom Caddy this cowpoke drove. http://www.texterry.com/page8.html
  24. Check out this link, then scroll down to see the custom Caddy this cowpoke drove. http://www.texterry.com/page8.html
  25. You might be able to decipher part of the VIN stamped in the pad on the block, just below the left head, but if it's a 425 as we suspect, it was out of a full size car. The PCV is the same for all Olds V8's for many years, up to 1988, just ask for one at a parts store.