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stude8

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Everything posted by stude8

  1. Gary, is the water loss when the engine is running? or just sitting shut off? If when running it could be a defect with the thermostat, temperature activated mechanism stuck shut, installed upside down so it can't activate when coolant gets hot or coolant passage or hose blocked with sediment or foreign material in water jacket. Give us more details, how long since car ran normally? What work recently done that might affect cooling? Stude8
  2. When you remove the water pump assy from lower left front of engine timing case you may find the part #24508 ring on the crank shaft is crumbling if it is still the original zinc die cast part. I had a new one made from Brass for my GB engine. Attached are photos of the project. I have a print of details to make a new 24508 ring for a machinist to have all dimensions from. Stude8
  3. My 1928 Commander Big Six is a model GB.
  4. If you are not concerned about originality you could do what I did on my 1928 Commander Big Six and add a modern spin on filter adapter under the running board cavity below passenger side door. It is not readily visible and easy to replace. Stude8
  5. You could be experiencing a head gasket leak. Remove your fanbelt and then run the engine for a few minutes and check the radiator for bubbles. If there is more bubbling without the water pump turning over it may be head gasket replacement time? You could try to retorque all the head bolts to the same ft/lbs and see if that helps reduce the bubbles. A can of cooling system sealer might cure the problem but plan on pulling the head and observe where the gasket appears to not be sealing tight. It might indicate the head has warpage and requires a resurfacing at a machine shop and/or a new head gasket. Of course the worst case could be a cracked cylinder head. Is the car 6 or 8 cylinders?
  6. The ammeter should be steady with the engine at a constant RPM and will read negative at idle but should rise into the charging range when running above 10 MPH normally. If your needle is jumping it might indicate a damaged generator commutator that cause the brushes to not contact the commutator segments continually. A broken brush spring can let a brush jump off the commutator and interrupt the current flow. An incorrect cutout relay or defective one can cause current irregularity to. It could even be a wire in the circuit with missing insulation that allows the circuit to short to ground subject to car vibration when moving. Take a quick observation of the wiring from the generator to the ammeter gauge under the dash for any shabby insulation or loose terminals. If that looks decent then you might have to pull the generator out onto a bench and open it up to examine the internal wiring and brushes for wear or damage. It could even be a brush with the carbon worn away to where it fails to track on the commutator segments. Good luck, you don't want to have a short circuit develope and cause a wiring fire. Stude8
  7. I attached 4 photos of Studebaker door and deck lid handle locks that show the different size lock cylinders and how they are retained inside the diecast handle shanks. If you look close you can see the brass expansion ring on the inner end of the lock cylinder that is spring loaded to expand outward and engage a groove inside the handle shank. This expansion "tab" is where one has to drill the small hole in the handle to insert a needle or wire to depress the "tab" to release the lock cylinder. The longer lock cylinders are retained by a roll pin that engages a groove undercut on the cylinder body that has to be driven out of the handle body in the area where the mtg flange is retained with the 5/8" lock nut. Hope these photos help show how these locks operate. Stude8
  8. I don't have an Erskine parts manual but on my 1928 Commander GB the wood wheel rim clamp bolts are Stude Part #107157 and this is 3/8-16 x 2-3/8". The same size bolts are used on front and rear rims, parts group L-5 front and L-6 rear. Stude8
  9. I will try to attach scans of the 1929 Commander brochure but the files are large some more than 1.5MB . If the size limits of the AACA forum reject the pages, post your email address and I can email them direct. *It looks like they all uploaded, this is a single sheet folder, each page is 7-1/4" wide x 9-1/4" tall. Each page is two sided and the sheet is 29" long with four pages front and back side. Stude8
  10. The 1929 Studebaker Commander brochure I have says: "Tires: Six-ply balloon 19 x 5.50-inch. Non-skid all around. Outside diameter, 31 inches."
  11. Finding useable loose door lock cylinders is a tough hunt. When I lived in Chicago area there were many lock smith shops around but early locks were still rare items. Eventually I found complete handles at antique auto swap meets and figured out how to salvage the lock cylinders. Exterior door lock cylinders are not possible to remove the cylinder from without drilling a small hole at a precise location on the handle shank to depress and release the internal retention expansion cam. I'll attach a copy of an article I wrote for the Antique Studebaker Club newsletter some years ago that shows the process. There is an artwork file that shows the drilling details but it is a .DOC file and this forum does not accept that format. Email me at studeracer_37@yahoo.com and I can send it direct. Stude8
  12. Duncan When you say the fan spins freely does that mean with the engine shut off? The fan should be held in place by the fan belt so when engine is stopped it should be held in a fixed position. The gear system is mean't to drive the internal oil pump within the fan housing that lubricates the fan bearings. If the fan turns freely with engine off something is defective inside the hub. Stude8
  13. I don't know how similar your 1930 Commander is to my 1928 Commander Big Six but I found a lot of silt accumulated around the rear cylinders in the water cavity with the side plates removed and had to use lots of water flushing to clear it out, I'll bet they scooped their water out of a muddy creek back then. Another cooling item on mine was the engine fan hub has an internal oil pump driven by small drive gears inside and requires cleaning and then fresh oil so it rotates the fan at fast speeds. Stude8
  14. Steve The serial number definitely identifies it as a 1939 Model 9A Commander six cylinder car. That information will help parts suppliers when hunting down parts for it here in the USA for sure. If you can find the Studebaker part numbers you require in the Chassis parts catalog you now have communicate with Robert Kapteyn in Joliet, Illinois. He has a 4 story warehouse filled with early parts of that era. John Shanahan (Stude8)
  15. Steve Just to help out here I can't locate data about a 1939 Studebaker Commander, in my chassis parts catalog [All eights 1929-1940] ? The last Commander listed is 1935 model 1B. The 1939 President model 5C used the planar suspension in front (chapter M, plate 53 on page 302) What is the serial number of the car you are working on? Maybe it is a six cylinder model not listed in the Eights catalog? John Shanahan
  16. This is a 1930 Studebaker President 8 State Victoria for four model FH (125" wheel base), it has a small tool compartment at the rear of the body and a fold down trunk rack with a metal trunk installed on it. It is powered by the President type FE 331 CID inline eight engine. The Victoria body was also available on the FE chassis with 135" wheel base. Stude8
  17. Deburt Studebaker Parts The Studebaker engine color is an Olive Green. I last purchased some for my 1928 Commander in 2003 from Chuck Studebaker Parts, 2410 W. Freeway Lane, Pheonix, AZ 85021, phone 602-995-5311. I attached a photo of my 1930 President 8 in that color. Stude8
  18. For reproduction rubber parts check out this site "Studebaker Reproduction Parts Listing" they produce many rubber parts for Studebakers. Stude8
  19. Dear Volk It would be important to identify the exact model and body style Studebaker you want the rubber and handles for. There is the chassis serial number plate located on left frame rail outer face about 12 inches to rear from front axle that has the serial number stamped into it and then on the body front panel on right side facing the engine compartment under the hood with the body style and number alphabetical and numerical letters stamped into it *See attached photo for where to look. With these two data tag numbers the correct parts can be determined from parts catalogs. I attached a photo of body tag location and 4 pages from the 1929 Studebaker body parts catalog, I don't have a 1928 President body catalog but the 1929 listing shows how they identified the handles by model and body style. Some handles have been reproduced in the past in bronze metal and once your style is determined maybe they are still available. You can see window regulator handles are R39 category; door lock handles inside are S22 category and door lock handles outside are S21 category. Please report your body and chassis numbers so we can help you find the parts you need. Stude8
  20. If you post a photo of the hub cap you need and measure the diameter of the rear side that engages the wheel rim I'll go thru my box of spare caps to see if I have a replacement for it. Stude8 email direct to studeracer_37@yahoo.com
  21. I just found a better quality bulletin about the non-electrical fuel gauge system with the fuel pick up assy illustrated better. king_seeley_gauge.pdf
  22. I have a service bulletin for the non-electrical fuel gauge and it includes a diagram of the fuel tank pickup tube device in case it is of help I'll attach a copy here. John Shanahan
  23. Well I went thru many part catalogs I have for Guaranteed; Niehoff from 1931 #15, 1941 #23, 1942 #24; Shurhit 1942 #90; Universal 1934 and then last was a Niehoff 1966 book. The 1966 book listed Industrial and Marine applications, a large 236 page edition. It showed many listings with "1111xxx" prefix's but NO 1111551?? I did find the following three closest numbers to the target #: 1111506 Austin-Western 4 cyl Sweeper for 1949; 1111534 Hyster 4 cyl lift trucks 1949-64; 1111716 Ingersol-Rand Air Compressor 1954 - 59. This search confirms it is most likely a industrial or marine application in the 1950 > 1964 era. Check with a boat yard that may have a marine parts catalog that covers the early 1950's. Stude8
  24. You have a real tough one to figure out here. The distributors with numbers starting with 1110xxxxx or 1112xxxxx are dated 1959 and 1960 era. I went through about 9 auto parts catalogs I have on file and none have any reference to 1111xxxxx series parts?? I suspect it might be a marine application distributor but don't have any catalogs for that subject. Stude8
  25. If you scrub the water pump housing with a wire brush and uncover a casting part number those owners with the same number pump could respond with their vehicle model and engine identification. Stude8
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