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Tinindian

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Tinindian last won the day on March 11 2017

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About Tinindian

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  1. The felloe is the part of the wheel that the outer ends of the spokes go into. First picture shows a wood felloe wheel, second picture is a steel felloe wheel.
  2. On the opposite end to the one you are trying to remove there appears to be a square wooden pin that goes all the way through the roller. Is it possible that this holds the whole spring mechanism in the roller?
  3. Sunvisor bracket is difference. OP picture visor looks to be '26-'27 ish.
  4. The easiest and best fix, certainly the first to try, is to drive it as if you were breaking it in. Get the engine up to operating temperature 20+ miles. Then drive it at the speed limit for a hundred or so miles suddenly backing off the gas and slowing down maybe ten miles an hour and then back up again every twenty miles or so. Do this every day for a week and see what happens. If you can't get out on the highway drive it around town leaving it in low gear. Up to 30 for a few minutes. suddenly back off the gas for a minute and then back up again every day for a week. Depending on h
  5. Yes, I am certain. The fact that it was assembled in the GMC plant in Regina, Saskatchewan may have something to do with it. He bought it new and as I was raised by my Grandparents I have been personally familiar with it since 1945. We also talked about things he had fixed. It was never back to the dealer for warranty work or repairs. Sparkplugs and points several times before I drove it. One broken axle in 1947 that was hammer welded by an old blacksmith and is still in the car today. One time when I was about 16 it dropped a valve keeper when we were out on the road. With my Grandfath
  6. I replace the original fabric in 1962 (it had spent all but one winter and all nights and most days in a garage for the first 29 years and 99,000 miles). Interestingly enough it was a smooth oilskin type fabric not any grain in it at all. I replaced it a second time in 1985 and now at 500,000 miles it needs it again. From 1959 until now it has been outside all day every working day year round through sunshine, rain and snow.
  7. Boiled linseed oil is one thing that will swell the spokes but if they are loose the correct repair is to respoke them. Horseshoe shaped shims between the spoke and the felloe is probably the worst solution. Any use with loose spokes makes them looser. Once the wood dries out and gets worn there is no repair other than new spokes. I find it funny how many people have a problem with loose spokes when I have put 400,000 miles on my Grandfathers 99,000 mile Pontiac with Jaxon wheels and have never had a problem even though one back wheel has a spoke that has had a check in it since 1937.
  8. Checking electrical wiring when you only have 6 volt potential really means undoing all connections and cleaning wire ends and posts. My '53 Buick would cut out occasionally at speed on the highway. After much checking I found a tiny bit of corrosion on one ignition coil primary wire. My '30 Pontiac would do the same thing and it was a tiny bit of corrosion on one ammeter connection. Good Luck
  9. Some information for you that might be important for a purchaser to know. The car has Hotchkiss drive, "Mechanics" universal joints, "Midland Steeldraulic" brakes, "King Seeley" gasoline gauge and Jaxon wood spoke wheels that would have been painted from the factory or wire spoked wheels. The rims on artillery wheels would originally have been cadmium plated. A 1930 Pontiac could be a Series 6-29A which is a early 1930 which was a continuation of the 1929 Pontiac referred to in advertising literature as "The New Pontiac Big Six". Built between August and December
  10. The rear extension does not look like it fits a torque tube. There fore not Chevrolet as they did not use a hotchkiss driveshaft. Also Chev transmissions in this era were bolted to, not integral with the cell housing. Shift tower does not look like 20's GM. Good luck with your search.
  11. The rear extension does not look like it fits a torque tube. There fore not Chevrolet as they did not use a hotchkiss driveshaft. Also Chev transmissions in this era were bolted to, not integral with the cell housing. Shift tower does not look like 20's GM. Good luck with your search.
  12. All the illustrations that I have seen for Series 6-29A and Series 6-30B (early and late 1930) Pontiacs' show the "Custom Sedan" with varnished wheels. All the other models with artillery wheels were painted. The first and last time my car was judged (1963) points were taken off because of the varnished wheels. At that time I did not have documentation to prove otherwise. Same year and same event a car won for having the best "laquer" job when in fact it was plain old fashioned enamel that I knew for a fact because the painting was done in our body shop. I have never put my car in f
  13. Wait another 25 years.
  14. Actually he didn't. He owned the shop and paid the wages to the men who invented most of the things he is credited with. He had great ideas and hired people to invent ways to make his ideas work. He also was a main contributor to Tesla's financial downfall.
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