Jump to content

Lozierman

Members
  • Posts

    216
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by Lozierman

  1. The bicycle is called a Bowden. It was made out of fiberglass.
  2. I couldn't find the ad. What is it listed as? Thanks.
  3. This is a Chandler. I think it is a 1917 or '18. Custom body, by whom?
  4. I agree. This is a well used 1911 Lozier Model 51 touring.
  5. It is a 1910 Lozier Model I touring. The Model I had a 6 cylinder motor thus the longer hood. NYC used many Loziers for their department cars Lozier was made n Plattsburgh NY and was a very expensive automobile. This Lozier would have cost about $5100. in 1910. I have been interested in the Lozier automobile since 1967. Anyone have any parts?
  6. No, that is another model 77 Lozier. That is a 1914 model. A few minor differences such as the "flat" fenders on a 1913, while the 1914 had "crowned" fenders.
  7. Definitely a Lozier! It is a Briarcliff model, 1910 to be exact. It appears the sidelamps have been painted black instead of being unpainted brass. I have been a fan of Lozier since I found a 1910 Briarcliff body here in Seattle WA. That was in 1968. I was a letter carrier and was delivering to a very old part of Seattle under the Spokane Street bridge. The man I bought it from had quit driving it in 1918 when the exhaust manifold broke and he didn't want to fix or replace it. He had sold the chassis and kept the body and many parts. He even gave me a copy of an ad from the Seattle Times where a local wrecking yard had a complete Lozier motor for sale for the price of $150.00. He thought the car was too old to spend that much money on it. I think he sold the chassis in about 1930, so it sat on his property for more than 10 years in the Seattle rain. He had a lot of other early cars too and as I helped him clean up his property and buildings we found a lot of really good stuff. Amazing what was there. I am still interested in any Lozier items; parts, literature, photos, stories, etc. I have a complete 1913 Lozier Montclair touring. Original, except it was repainted many years ago. It was found in Montana in White Sulphur Springs in a barn.
  8. Definitely a Lozier! It is a Briarcliff model, 1910 to be exact. It appears the sidelamps have been painted black instead of being unpainted brass. I have been a fan of Lozier since I found a 1910 Briarcliff body here in Seattle WA. That was in 1968. I was a letter carrier and was delivering to a very old part of Seattle under the Spokane Street bridge. The man I bought it from had quit driving it in 1918 when the exhaust manifold broke and he didn't want to fix or replace it. He had sold the chassis and kept the body and many parts. He even gave me a copy of an ad from the Seattle Times where a local wrecking yard had a complete Lozier motor for sale for the price of $150.00. He thought the car was too old to spend that much money on it. I think he sold the chassis in about 1930, so it sat on his property for more than 10 years in the Seattle rain. He had a lot of other early cars too and as I helped him clean up his property and buildings we found a lot of really good stuff. Amazing what was there. I am still interested in any Lozier items; parts, literature, photos, stories, etc. I have a complete 1913 Lozier Montclair touring. Original, except it was repainted many years ago. It was found in Montana in White Sulphur Springs in a barn.
  9. Looks like a very challenging project. It will be interesting to see his progress.
  10. Your Chandler is looking good. Harold would be very happy you're being a good caretaker of it and using it as he had done over his years of ownership.
  11. This is a 1913 Lozier Model 77 touring. I have the identical Lozier. Why do I know it is a 1913? The 1913 has flat topped fenders. In 1914 the Model 77s had rounded top fenders. Thanks for posting this photo. Do you have any other Lozier photos to post?
  12. This must be from an Australian fan. "Down Under"!
  13. Could you show a photo of the leather coupler, (disk drives) you made? How did you make it? I need one made for my 1913 Lozier and am looking for ideas. Thanks.
  14. The car and the motor shown on the left is a 1914 Model 84 Lozier.
  15. I think it is a 1909 Auto Focus! LOL
  16. Did a little research. There seems to be at least two other 1917 White touring left. One is in the Person museum in LA and another in the Yellowstone museum. Others?? It does look to be original.
  17. That looks like a non-original cat to me. I suspect it was something made in the 50s much like the "curved dash Olds" made with modern engines. I notice the use of plywood, when this probably wasn't used in an original automobile. Others' thoughts?
  18. Any updates on this Chandler? I am hoping it turns up without any damage.
  19. Chris, I think Harold would be pleased that you are now the owner of his Chandler. Want to come up to my place and work on my two 1914 Chandlers? LOL Take care my friend.
  20. I know of a Pickwick motor in a shipping crate. The owner said it was built by Pierce Arrow.
  21. The picture just above is a speedster made from a Lozier. Looks to be a four cylinder, probably a Model 46 as evidenced by the coil that extends into the engine area, (look at the top of the firewall). Obviously non original Lozier fenders. I would love to obtain any Lozier parts from this or any other Lozier chassis! This has a T-head motor. The Gemmer steering column and steering wheel are evidenced too. The horn is not factory, but the seats appear to be correct for a Briarcliff.
×
×
  • Create New...