BruceW

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Everything posted by BruceW

  1. Charlier Here is the URL to a map in the online AACA Policy and Procedures Manual showing which states make up the Eastern, Southeaster, Central, and Western Divisions. http://www.aaca.org/publications/pp/AACADivision.jpg Hope this helps.
  2. While we are talking about fire trucks, the following information was recently posted on the wesite for one of the town fire departments in our county. I thought I'd share it in case others might find it interesting. <span style="font-size: 17pt"><span style="font-weight: bold">1923 American LaFrance Returns to AFD after 53 years!</span></span> <span style="font-style: italic">This 1923 American LaFrance Pumper was originally purchased by the Aberdeen Fire Department on May 17, 1923. The unit was the departments first motorized unit and served for 31 years, when in 1954 is was sold to a farm in Cecil County, Maryland. There is served the farm's needs for 22 years until it was sold to private individual from Anne Arundel County, Maryland in 1976. It was cared for there for approximately 31 years until today, December 15, 2007 when it was purchased for the second time by AFD and returned home. The unit is right hand drive with the gas pedal on the left and brakes on the right. The brakes are on two wheels only and are the mechanical type, no air or hydraulics. The 6 cylinder gasoline engine powers the vehicle through a chain drive. The electrical system is only 6 volt, which is why the vehicle has an auxiliary hand crank start on the front. The pump is rated at 600 gpm and is a rotary gear type. </span>
  3. A little over a year ago, one of our Region members found a 1963 Chevrolet/Howe fire truck that was being auctioned online. It had been bought new by the town of Clarance, Missouri in 1963. From what I was told, the town has a population of approximately 900 people and this was their only fire truck. The town doesn't even have a fire house, but kept the fire truck parked in a small municipal garage with the police car and snow plow. The fire truck was auctioned so they could by a newer model (either a late 70s or early 80s model). Our member offered a bid of $1800 and won the auction. It cost almost as much as he paid for the truck to have it delivered. I was told that the truck was never used outside of the town limits and it had only 2400 miles on the odometer when it was delivered to Maryland with all of its equipment. The truck is completely original and all of the pumps and equipment on the truck works. Even the clutch and brake pedal pads and rubber floor mat in the cab look almost new. The only bad places is the paint on the front step bumper scuffed by the fireman's boots and a little scratching on the rear cab corners when the ladders were being taken off and put back on.
  4. My wife Di has been very involved in "our" old car hobby as long as we have been married (22 years this past December). Shes loves all old cars, from the very early brass era cars to 60s muscle. She attends all regional and National events with me unless something prevents her from doing so. She hopes to one day own either a 1930/31 Ford coupe or 1957 Chevrolet that she can call her very own. On a region level, Di has served as the region photographer, activities director, executive board member, and on many committees over the years. She is always working on ideas for one region activity or another. Luckily, in our AACA region, most of the wives are as active as the men in attedning meetings and activities So Di has many friends there. In the past, she received our region's Harold Clemens Award, which is awarded for the person the club believes did the most to benefit the region over the past year. In the 17 years we have belonged to AACA and Harford Region, Di and I have planned or co-planned 15 two or three day antique car tours together. These tours would not have been nearly as successful without her ideas, enthusiasm, and hard work. Di has assisted me each month for the past 7 years that I have been editor of our region newsletter, doing the proofreading, printing, and distribution. Di and I were invited to participate on the planning committee under Douglas Drake when the initial planning for the AACA Youth program was being done and she was very excited to be a part of it. When the need arose, she also did things, such as greet the youth and oversee the youth pizza party at past Annual Meetings. During the time I have been a Director of the AACA Library & Research Center, she has always been quick to volunteer to work the AACA L&RC table at events such as the Annual Meeting when the L&RC Directors had to be somewhere else. Di loves to drive our 1931 Ford Deluxe Tudor and often does, especially if I am away and cannot make a region event, she will go herself or with our daughters in the Ford. One of her prized possesions is her "This Lady Drives a Model A Ford" patch on her club jacket. When the engine in the Ford had to be removed for repair, Di even asked to help, and under my instruction, she completed all of the procedures needed to pull the engine from the car. She also looks forward to helping me restore a 1935 Ford pickup. Another aspect of her old car hobby is collecting original vintage clothing and accessories from the early 1930s and 1920s. She has worn her outfits to many old car events and weddings that we have done with the Ford. Di has meet many friends through the AACA and other old car hobbies. Her favorite events include attending the AACA Annual Meeting, Das Awkcsht Fescht, and also regional and AACA tours.
  5. This story hase been going around for about a year now and generating quite a stir. Even Snopes has a page on it. http://www.snopes.com/politics/business/hersheys.asp There is also another post on the DF that discusses this news. It appears that Hershey is expanding its business into Mexico. From all of the news reports I read on the web there will be an approximate 1500 employees laid off from its 13,000 total employees nationwide. The closings consist of its Canadian factory (eliminating all production in Canada), and small factories in Oakdale, California; Naugatuak, Connecticut; and Reading, Pa. It is reported that some of the employees in the Hershey, PA plant will be laid off but there was nothing said about closing the main plant in Hershey or Hershey Park. Even if the company was to pack up and leave completely from Pennsylvania, I doubt it would stop the the annual Eastern Division Fall Meet from being held somewhere. Every other national meet is held at a different place each year and I am sure (even if it is smaller), that another location could be found in the Eastern Division for this meet.
  6. I think it is inevidable that a non-reponse will happen now and then, such as from the one hit or first time posters discussed or the reasons that West gave. However, I think it is a minority of posts though in which that happens. Perhaps answering the one hit posters might interest them to become more responsive as regular posters.
  7. C.Evans, I don't have any information on the history of the company but I found the following URL which is an online copy of a 1904 issue of "The Horseless Age" magazine that includes an article on the 4 cylinder engine offered by the Brennan Motor Car Company: http://books.google.com/books?id=ggoAAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA358&lpg=PA358&dq=brennan+automobile+1902&source=web&ots=GBIoV2Kgj3&sig=fAQ3RwO0w94LOamQPRaKkujMfF0#PPA421,M1 I also did a very quick search of the AACA Library & Research Center (www.aacalibrary.org) holdings via their online search capability and found the following on the Brennan Touring Car: Title: <span style="font-weight: bold">Brennan Clippings Compilation </span> Summary: A small variety of one-color misc. clippings and an 8x10 blasck/white photograph. All pieces pertain to Brennan models and engines manu- factured in Syracuse, NY. Call number: 92-B0714 Title: <span style="font-weight: bold">ADVANCE SHEET / BRENNAN STANDARD MOTORS...1904 </span> Summary: 4.5x6.25 one-color catalog; 12 pages including covers; date stamps and other markings; repaired with black tape. Illustrates and describes chassis, engine, and transmission for the 1904 Brennan Touring Car. Call number: 99-B1854 Because the L&RC catalog is currently in the processs of being put online, there is a possibility that the L&RC may have additional Brennan literature and/or reference books that include the Brennan which have not yet been listed online. You may want to contact the L&RC librarian Kim Miller to see if they have more information on the Brennan. You can contact Kim at 717-534-2082 or by email at kmiller@aacalibrary.org. I don't know if you are looking for this type of information, but I hope this helps.
  8. David, Sorry to hear of your loss in the Alamance Region. The AACA family gets smaller each time such a loss occurs. 2007 has been a tough year in our region with 6 longtime members passing in just one year.
  9. Jim, I appreciate you pointing out your previous post. I guess one of the times that I skipped over the previously read posts to read the newest ones, I must have skipped down too far and completely missed your post on the crazedlist. Thanks.
  10. My wife Di began collecting early 1930 and earlier clothing about 10 years ago when we purchased our 1931 Ford Deluxe Tudor. Vintage wear doesnt just have to include clothes but also accessories, such as outerwear, purses, shoes, compacts, jewelry, hats and much more. Di's collection even includes items such as an original ladies swimsuit from the 1920s. Her collection of original clothing and accssories eventually resulted in me purchasing a large antique wardrobe just to hold all of her items and it is currently filled. Di always makes sure her items are era correct as she used to enter vintage clothing fashion shows and won a number of awards at Model A Ford events. If you are wanting clothes just for driving in the car, you don't have to be quite so particular because practically no one that sees you will know the differences. Her vintage clothing desires are a little more difficult to find as she only collects original items and does not do any reproductions. However, she continues to find items (she once found three packs of vintage 1920's ladies stockings that were unopened from an old store stock). She has found items in numerous antique stores, vintage clothing dealers off the internet, and even on Ebay once in a while. The one problem with original clothing is that she has had to "retire" some dresses, because their condition eventually became too delicate for continued wearing without damaging it. This is one place where reproducton is nice as it is new clothing and will stand up to a lot of use. Below, Di poses in one of her more formal outfits from the late 1920s.
  11. Received word from Brooke Davis of the Hornet's Nest Region that he received an MEA this year. This will be the 10th MEA that Brooke has received for HNR's "Member's Parade". Way to go Brooke!
  12. I have to confess... I forgot about the NAAP... I admit that at first, Di and I checked the finished newsletter with the NAAP scoring sheet each month, but we stopped after the second month. As with David, the majority of items on the NAAP were the same that we had already been putting in our newsletter for a number of years. I quit counting points and concentrated on making the best newsletter I could for our members; and the NAAP drifted out of my already questionable memory. Judy posting this thread made me think about it again. I concur with David, that the NAAP guidelines are useful for knowing what the Publications committee is looking for. The guidelines also helps to remove a lot of speculation from the process, which could vary greatly among different reviewers. The NAAP can be an especially good aid for new or fairly new editors. When I first saw the guidlines last year, my main concern was that it seemed to have limited consideration for quality and creativity. (an Excel spreadsheet can present all of the data but is not necessarily that enjoyable to read). I guess that would move back into speculation. At this time, I cannot think of anything that needs to be added. I know the committee put a lot of work in the NAAP and it shows. Good job!
  13. <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Bhigdog</div><div class="ubbcode-body">If memory serves, a couple of years ago there was a link sponsored by the AACA for photo stamps. I think the club got a cut from each order.</div></div> That is correct. That is where we purchased our stamps. You had to use the link for the club got some of the proceeds.
  14. It is a separate postage company, not the USPS, that provides the stamps. We bought some of the photo stamps for Christmas in 2005 as gifts for some of the family (as you can see, the postage value is now outdated). We bought some for my sister with her 71 Mustang on it and my parents 65 Galaxie 500XL convertible on it. We figured then they they will probably never be used.. it was just something that was interesting at the time.
  15. Our issue FINALLY arrived in the mail today. Been hearing about the issue from other AACA members and reading about it on the DF. Have only had a chance to thumb though it so far but it looks fantastic as always. Will read it in depth later tonight. I especially love the photos of the Thomas Flyer. Di will be in heaven with the front cover..as that is the exact car she wants one day (maybe she shoulda thought of that before she married this poor dumb country bumpkin. ) Thanks to West and his elves for another great issue.
  16. Who can forget Sal?? Hi Sal, Glad to hear the kids are doing better healthwise and all your hard work is paying off. Was good to see you at Hershey this year. Hope you'll be able to make it to Philly again this year. Our thoughts and prayers to you and the family.
  17. The AACA also has "The Speed Kings" (first movie on the list DBroadster mentioned) available for loan on video. It is included in a 3 part video that also includes "The First Glidden Tour of 1905" and the W.C. Fields film "Hurry, Hurry". The AACA has lots of old films and movies for loan to AACA Regions. There are many topics, including early car related movies (e.g. Laurel and Hardy, W.C., Fields, etc.), early automobile advertisements and documentaries, and early AACA events. A lot of them are on 16mm film but many have are now available on video in an ongoing effort over the past few years to convert the films to VHS tape. I've used the fil/video library several times for a program at a region meeting and as "Movie Night" during some of our Region's weekend tours. The AACA film and Video lists can be found under the Resources tab at the top of the page or at the following URLs: Video List: www.aaca.org/resources/video/video_list.aspx Film List: www.aaca.org/resources/video/film_list.aspx
  18. BruceW

    Car in photo

    Hi Guys, I also noticed and was going to remark on the straight bottom of the windshield frame in the photo but Leif beat me to it. Leif, you mentioned a 1916 WK having a straight windshield frame, but the the following URL is suppose to be a 1916 WK and it has a curved frame bottom. http://clubs.hemmings.com/clubsites/wokr/gallery/wk_10.htm Do you have a photo of a 1916 WK with the straight windshield frame you can post? I found photos of what is supposidly a 1919 Maxwell roadster on a dealer site at: http://www.vintagecarstore.com/webpages42005/19maxwell.htm and it had the straight windshield frame.. but it also had a significantly different cowl. I noticed that the early WKs (and the 1919 Maxwell) have a significant drop in the cowl from the windshield to the hood, whereas in the old photo (unless the quality of the photo is misleading) it appears that the car had a fairly straight windshield to hood line .... similar to that shown in the 1920 Maxwell illustration Leif provided earlier (but that car had the curved windshield frame). Also, the photo of the 1920 Maxwell shows the windshield split to be in the middle of the frame, where the old photo shows a windshield split in the lower area of the frame. Another small detail I noticed was the hubcaps. Where the early WKs and Maxwells, have a fairly large diameter cap resulting in almost like a mushroom effect from the spindle, the cap on the wheels of the car in the photo appear to be approximately the same diameter as the spindle. This is similar to the caps on the 1922 Maxwell I saw at the following URL: http://forums.aaca.org/misc/467651-L03.jpg However, this Maxwell has both disk wheels and a curved windshield frame. I really appreciate all of the assistance and comments that you have put into this. I know it is difficult with such a bad photo and ut may never be identified. However, I know the lady in the photo will really appreciate the attempts.
  19. BruceW

    Car in photo

    Thought I'd give it one more try before conceding defeat.
  20. BruceW

    Car in photo

    I was scanning some photos for a lady member of our AACA Region and I posted below one of her that was taken in 1927. She does not know what type of car is in the photo but I told her I would try to find out. I know the photo is not great but perhaps an ID of th year and type of car can be made? Any and all assistance is appreciated by me and the lady in the photo. Thanks/
  21. Looks like the stickers are popping up on everything from stock antiques to rods. Seen a lot of requests on different forums for them.
  22. Ted, If I am not mistaken, Kruse and RM both did auctions at Fall Hershey this year. Kruse was at the Giant Center and RM was at the Hershey Lodge.
  23. Thanks for the info Leonard. It was early Wednesday morning when I saw the vehicle parked in the car corral and they had not yet put the sign on it (not that I would have known what a Van Blerick was even if the sign had been there). Imagine a vehicle with such an overly enormous size, gaudy ornamentaton and limited practibility on the road today. Wait.. thats an Escalade