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strangeplant

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  1. Sagefinds, can you post your pics of the larger shock belt mounts, please? I'm hoping they will fit a 1-1/2" wide belt. Let me know. Thanks, Tom
  2. You are kidding! This sure looks like the genuine lost Hudson switch! Everything about it - its uncanny - can it really be?
  3. In the past, I've heard of one of these selling for $350 to $450. I've never seen one myself, except on a museum car, or a car at Hershey. I've been looking for three years. They just do not exist and tend to self-destruct because of the high amps load of the headlights. I'm going to solve that by using relays under the dash. The switch does not have a stamped number as far as I know. The following is the best picture I can find. Not too helpful. https://drive.google.com/file/d/1ZQL0B4nYYN9dFglNHtQOnAvYylDxcKA7/view?usp=sharing Shows the switch on the end of the steering column. The terminals come off the body at 80 deg angle. The switch internally has 11 contacts in a circle. The Dodge switch has 12. No big difference. I just need to know where the terminals attach to for the Dodge, should be something like 1 Off, 2 Brake lite enabled, 3 running and cowl light on,4 low beam headlight, 5 high beam headlight. Switch did have a fuse (not needed) and a dropping resistor wire coil for the low beam (can be done off-switch). The center shaft was hollow, with the horn wire passing through, and that can be drilled. I think its totally proper to construct this missing switch any way I can and if I can keep a car working by using a modified Dodge switch, well, that's the way its gotta be. There is a long procedure worked out and available to replace the contact innards of a destroyed or inoperable switch using the mechanical assembly. I was just hoping to find someone with a wiring diagram for the Dodge so I can apply that to my car. That's all.
  4. Well, I suppose I could do that, but the intent might also fail or end up non-standard. I'll do it if still for sale.
  5. I got a 1934 Dodge Clum 9526 from eBay with the intent of adapting it to my Hudson car. It will take some machining, and I can do that. I'm looking for information on the original designed use connections to this switch so I can apply it correctly. If lucky, I won't need to modify it at all. Anyone happen to have a 1934 Dodge?
  6. BTW, there is one more available if anyone else needs one. So rare.
  7. Its not the right one, but I can make it work, and that is all that counts. I'll cut the shaft off at the cross hole, take the thing apart and put it in the lathe. Put a taper at the end of the shaft, trim the threaded section back to expose longer shaft and thread it there to make the end of a closing chuck. Drill a through hole 0.281 diameter to mate with the steering column shaft. Make a taper closing nut out of a 1/4" brass flare nut. Then rearrange the contacts. I'm so fortunate that Hans1 spotted this and posted the link. Many thanks, Hans1, I really appreciate your help. I've been looking for a very long time. This probably came out of a rod rat modification, I'll bet. No other way it would exist. Regards, /Tom
  8. These are impossible to find as replacements. Rebuilding is sometimes possible. But, many of us need the real thing. In my case, I don't have anything. Its gone. These switches did fit a number of cars besides the early Hudson, e.g. Studebaker, Lincoln, even tractors and airplanes. So I do not understand why someone by now hasn't produced a generic replacement. OK, yes, I suppose that I could use a model A Ford lighting switch, but that would really hurt me a lot. Any answers for the switchless?
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