kfle

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kfle last won the day on October 6 2019

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About kfle

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  • Gender:
    Male
  • Location:
    West Michigan
  • Interests:
    Classic and Antique Cars

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  1. I am glad to hear it. Carol is the executive director of the CCCA museum. Kevin
  2. Did you email Carol Vogt directly? She is usually responsive. cvogt@cccamuseum.org
  3. Excellent event and my son and I will be attending again this year for the tour and the weekend show. It is not just a show either as you can drive around the campus, participate in car games, and see lots of demos. My son loved driving the 1923 Cole giving people rides all day on the Saturday. I highly recommend attending this weekend event!
  4. This document is for Al who gave me a call today. Hopefully you can find the serial number on your 24!
  5. There are probably differences between earlier brass cars to the early 20's to the big classics in the late 20's and 30's. Also differences between the engineers at different manufacturers as well. Here is a direct copy from the 1920 Cadillac Type 61 Shop Manual that was given to the mechanics and service departments for Cadillac. This is their guidance on Spring lubrication and also from troubleshooting on the ride of the car. The troubleshooting section points you to the lubrication as well as replacement if the lubrication doesn't work. The Type 61 was the big Cadillac with the V8 engine. I was lucky enough to find this shop manual and it is excellent. I have two V8 Cole's from the early 20's that are similar to the Cadillac and a Cole shop or service manual is not known to exist. A lot of what you see out there today is from people applying modern knowledge to fixing and how they would do it. I try to go by the recommendations of what I can find from original materials.
  6. Thanks for sharing and I have not seen that picture before. That is a 1919-1921 Cole Aero 8 Tourster. 1922 had side mounted spares and then for 1923 they went to big barrel headlights. Here is a nice picture of 1922 Cole Aero 8 with the side mounted tires. Otherwise very similar wo the picture you shared.
  7. kfle

    Cunningham

    For whatever reason I watched the live bidding on the car and it got up to $375k which didn't meet reserve so they passed on the lot. I was shocked that the bidding made it that high.
  8. I have only been a member of the CCCA for about 1 year now and I have thought the logo represents the CCCA well. There are probably some things you could do to 'modernize' it but I don't think it turns anyone away either.
  9. In West Michigan by the Gilmore Car museum I paid $2.09 a gallon for my pickup and then at the same gas station paid $2.69 a gallon for 100% ethanol free gas for my old cars. I could not imagine paying those prices in California!
  10. Who is shooting the messenger? I just don’t understand how you can take the views of your great grand children and apply that everywhere? My youngest son is 16 so about in the same ballpark as your great grand children and I hear differently. I live in the Detroit area so am very intune to the automotive trends and market. I have also been in the high tech industry that haS ushered in this change for over twenty five years. Myself and others that I know like me look at the old cars as a get away from the fast paced high tech life that we live almost 24 hours a day. It is very therapeutic to drive and work on a car from the 1910s. The hobby to me is about having fun and enjoying the cars and less about having the cars judged, hanging out in clubs, and hyper focusing on value. I would posit that in the future the old cars will have owners, drivers, and enthusiasts, however the old clubs and current old car social structure will fade away.
  11. Sorry to hear that your grandchildren do not share your views but you can’t take their view and generalize it across everyone. I am 48 and never was into old cars. About three years ago that bit flipped when on an impulse by I purchased a Ford Model A roadster. My 20 year old daughter at the time dragged my wife and I to a car place so she could look at a VW bus. While looking at the bus we saw that Model A and fell in love. My daughter bought the bus and we bought the Model A. I didn’t t know one thing about it, though I learned and fell in love. I now own six collector cars with five of them being pre 1931. My 19 year old son has the bug even more than me. He owns a car from 1923 and his friends even love it. My 23 year old daughter drives that 1978 VW bus as her daily driver and she knows others her age who are similar. Do my son son and daughter belong to any clubs? Would they participate on a forum like this? No so they don’t show up on the radar and the perception is young people don’t like old cars. My son is also an instructor at a model t driving school at a large museum and the amount of younger people signing up for that and loving it is quite surprising. I know many other guys in their 40s that own pre war cars and enjoy the heck out of them but do not belong to any of the typical clubs either. Why is that? The biggest reason is that we all work and the local clubs like the Model A club loves to have their bi weekly breakfasts and lunches on weekdays. Things change and times are different but I know a lot of younger interest in old cars, you just have to know where to find it. My case is opposite of yours as my younger generation children got me into the hobby because of their interest.
  12. Yes that is my sons. This summer there was an exhibit of seven Coles at the Gilmore.
  13. I am glad you enjoyed it. That 1913 Cole is mine as well and is my favorite of our Coles. It looks even better in the sunlight!