53 New Yorker

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About 53 New Yorker

  • Rank
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  • Birthday 07/13/1964

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  • Gender:
    Male
  • Location:
    Northern Indiana County, Pennsylvania
  • Interests:
    1910 Diamond T Roadster Model D (unrestored)
    1914 American LaFrance Speedster (Lots of fun to drive)
    1925 Franklin Model 11A sedan
    1928 Franklin Convertible Coupe'
    1926 Chrysler "70" restoration project
    1948 Chrysler Windsor
    1953 Chrysler New Yorker Have owned it since college
    1967 Buick Electra 25

    Currently, President of the H.H. Franklin Car Club
    member of: AACA
    Horseless Carriage Club of America
    H.H. Franklin Club
    Walter P. Chrysler club

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  1. Personal experience.... When I was young (18 yrs old) and had just bought my 1953 New Yorker, It turned over rather slowly, as if it wasn't going to "get there". My father said I should put an 8V battery in it and it should be fine. Conversation went something like this.. Dad, "Those damn 6V systems were lousy, even back then, That is why they all went to 12V" Me, " But it is a 6V system" Dad, "It won't hurt anything, and your starter will turn it over like it is supposed to" I doubted Chrysler meant for an 8V battery to be in there... What about the lights and gauges, I wondered to myself. So, I asked my Grandfather's Brother, who was a Texaco service station owner after the war... He said, "Get your starter rebuilt" and gave me the name and number of an old fellow to take it to. I re-installed the starter after I got the call to come pick it up, and DANG, if it didn't turn over like the day the car was new! That was 35 years ago. The starter still turns the engine over with "gusto" ! BTW.. I still have the "modified" 5/8ths open end wrench rattling around in my tool box, just in case I ever have to get that almost hidden nut off and pull the starter. My advice: Find an old fellow who rebuilds starters and generators, and have a set of brushes installed and have it checked over. Keep with 6V!
  2. Thanks for the leads... Bernbaums has them listed in their catalog for 2.00 ea. But shipping is 13.00! Robert's shipping on 2 of them is 15.00! This is a part that can be put in an envelop and sent with a Forever Stamp on it!!!! What the heck!???
  3. Hello Keithb7. I'm thinking the same thing about re-sleeving the original unit, and that way, keeping the one that came with the car from the factory, with the car. I'm going to be looking for a place to do the re-sleeving. BTW... I used your 13/16ths open end wrench method of getting those "c" clips off. Do you know where I can get replacements for them? I must have done something "not quite right" because mine became bent and out of shape.
  4. Well... Today is a "Day off" for me, So I screwed up my courage and went out to the garage to address getting the M Cylinder out of the car. I had a little trouble with that huge return spring for the clutch pedal. I didn't realize the nut on that adjustment end of it is actually very "deep" and I un-screwed it to the point that I thought I could get the spring tension down far enough to deal with getting the "clip" off the pedal linkage. I used a crow-bar and huge screw driver to finally get the linkage apart... Don't even try to imagine what I was doing under the dash with a crow bar.... LOL Anyway... I now know better, and getting that spring back in place shouldn't be 1/2 as difficult now. Although, I'm already scratching my head, wondering how I'm going get all this stuff back together when the time comes. But, for now, I have the Critter (M/Cylinder) out of the car and I've cleaned off most of the 67 years of much and mire! Taken some pictures and starting to evaluate if it can be re-built, or re-sleeved, or if it just needs to be re-placed with new. BTW... please take note of the fitting for the line that goes back to the brake booster assist. I'll enter another update once I've taken the innards out of it and can tell what my next step should be.
  5. hey there Keithb7 & c49er These pictures and explanation are Terrific ! This is going to be a great help for me. THANK YOU!
  6. I agree... All that grease and grime didn't preserve them very well... It looks like they are compression fittings, and I should be able to have them made by just about anyone. Even myself... if pressed. Too bad I can't just call up to parts counter at my local Chrysler/DeSoto/Dodge/Plymouth dealership and order that line. Bwa Ha Ha
  7. Decided to take some picture of the 67 years of grime .. and of the master cylinder, and that extra line on the top of the MC that runs back to the booster canister. 1st picture is from the top ( please notice that huge return spring on the clutch pedal! How do you get that off, and on again? 2nd picture is from below the car 3rd picture is of the lines to the booster that is tucked up in the frame of the car, below the driver's seat area
  8. Yup, I figured the same thing as well.... Time for a new one. I highly doubt it wouldn't have pitting after all these years. I've replaced the wheel cylinders twice over the years... Now it is time for the Master Cylinder. I just got home from work, and will call Mobilparts.
  9. Hey Guys, I've relaunched my request for help with my master Cylinder in the Chrysler section... Thank you for all the help you are giving me, and I'm keeping my note handy from what you've told me so far. But, I didn't know I could go directly into a "Chrysler Section"... until just now. See you all over there Bill
  10. Hello everyone I'm re-posting this in the Chrysler section, because I was in the General AACA section... and even though I was getting some help from a few devoted Chrysler guys... I think I'll get even more information in here. I've owned my 1953 Chrysler for 37 years now, and have always done my own maintenance, including brake work. But, until now, I haven't had to pay attention to the Master Cylinder, beyond topping it off with fluid and flushing out the system every couple of years. Now, I've got to replace the mater cylinder, and have no idea where to start. The books I have, talk about rebuilding it... but they don't go into detail about the actual removal and installation process. I've lifted the floor panel, and can see a very strong looking spring that holds the clutch pedal, and wonder how to release the tension on it... I also wonder what linkages truly need to come off the pedals, and then how to get the pedals off the master cylinder. Can this be down through the floor of the car, or does it have to be jacked up and do I have to get under the car? Basically, I'm wondering HOW does a person get the master cylinder out and then back in again? Thanks for any help Bill
  11. Thank you for the offer... Are you a parts supplier? Where would I go to find your store?
  12. Hello Keithb7, I see the interior of your Chrysler is the same color as mine! Your photos did come through, and I appreciate having them, for a guide. I'm still wondering what the proper sequence is for getting the master cylinder out of the car. One thing that really has me puzzled is that very strong looking return spring on the clutch pedal. How do you get that off, and then how do you get it back in place... It looks like it could cause some major damage if your fingers get in the wrong place!
  13. A new 'wrinkle" in the MC issue.... My NYer has power (assist) brakes, and when I called Andy Burnbaum today to order up the MC, The person on the other end of the phone said they did not have the Power Brake MC, BUT... I could buy the "standard one" and drill and tap a hole in it for the line to the booster... OR, I could just cap off the line to the booster and use the "non-power brake MC" Frankly.... I figured I better look into why I would go the route of having "non-power brakes" on the car that has had them for 66 years? I DON'T THINK SO ! BTW... I have the chilton's manual for 1953, and it doesn't give a process for removing the MC... But it does give an "exploded" view of the inner working of the MC. Any help would be great. Cheers
  14. Hello Keithb7, I'm not sure why... but your pictures did not come through on my end.
  15. Hello everyone I've owned my 1953 Chrysler for 37 years now, and have always done my own maintenance, including brake work. But, until now, I haven't had to pay attention to the Master Cylinder, beyond topping it off with fluid and flushing out the system every couple of years. Now, I've got to replace the mater cylinder, and have no idea where to start. The books I have, talk about rebuilding it... but they don't go into detail about the actual removal and installation process. I've lifted the floor panel, and can see a very strong looking spring that holds the clutch pedal, and wonder how to release the tension on it... I also wonder what linkages truly need to come off the pedals, and then how to get the pedals off the master cylinder. Can this be down through the floor of the car, or does it have to be jacked up and do I have to get under the car? Basically, I'm wondering HOW does a person get the master cylinder out and then back in again? Thanks for any help Bill