rustyjazz1938

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About rustyjazz1938

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  1. I'm a bit late to the party as usual, but I also have a 1914 Studebaker (No. 410562) and would be willing to offer any help. I'll send a PM with contact info...
  2. I looked at this car at the show and I believe it is a 1921 Holmes
  3. I am also planning on having a car driving around the nights prior, and on display at Pasteiner's the day of the Dream Cruise. I hope to have my 1922 Oldsmobile Model 47 V8 Touring Car out and about: I have significantly more work to get the Oldsmobile up and running than Mr. Hausmann does with his cars though. You'll notice I'm pointing at something missing from the car... The sharp eyed folks will see it in the background. Luckily it is much closer to being back together again than when this picture was taken... 😁 Nothing like a deadline to help you get the work done!
  4. Yes I can use the timing lever like normal. I believe the 29's still had one. I've been meaning to measure the total advance to see how close it is to spec, too many other projects have gotten in the way.
  5. My apologies the greasiness of the photos, I had a bad rocker arm cover gasket. The car was setup like this when I got it, but I think it was just a drop in... The car has always ran very strong with this setup
  6. I don't have access to a picture right now, but I am fairly certain my 27-27 is running with a 1929 distributor. Makes finding caps and ignition points much much easier and cheaper. When I get a chance I will try to capture a snapshot
  7. Brian, From someone whom is still hanging around the farm for a bit longer (I hope!), my heartfelt congratulations to you. Best of luck on the next adventure, I hope to see you in the Buick somewhere down the road. Rusty
  8. No interest on my side of things (I mean there's interest, but I have way too many projects right now ?), however there looks to be three total cars in the unit (two behind the parts car). At least one looks to be a 1 or 2 cylinder horseless carriage (REO maybe?), and another car with a top up in the way back...
  9. Hi All, I'm the guilty owner of the 27 Standard that ran on the dyno. I say guilty, but then again, I would do it all over again in a heartbeat! ? I've been reader of this forum for a while, but never really posted anything. I've been a fan of Buicks for a while and was lucky enough to acquire this well maintained car a few years back. The car has been a great driver and usually gets a fair amount of attention at shows in the area here as it usually is one of the oldest cars at the show. I have not done any work on the engine internals since I have gotten the car, however, I have switched to a Carter BB-1 carburetor as the Marvel was in really rough shape and performed general maintenance (valve lash, plugs, points, wires, condenser, etc...). I was at the Cars and Coffee and saw the dyno, and thought why not? I spoke with the guys sponsoring it, and they were very excited at the opportunity. The guy running the dyno was great, especially with helping a driver like me who has never run a car on a dyno before. All in all, it was a great experience. As to the power level, I must admit that I was a bit surprised at how low it was, thinking the same thing as Terry and nzcarnerd, knowing that the BHP rating at the flywheel was 63Hp. Even assuming a 30% driveline loss (double the standard rule of thumb of 15%), to factor in thicker oils, and old style gear interfaces, plus tire to road wheel interface, the number should have been around 40Hp. However, when I look at a video of the run that my father took, on a few of the down transients from wide open throttle, the engine puffs a cloud of blue smoke, making me think that the rings might not be in the best of shape. That being said the car still runs great and I don't really plan on looking into this right now as I've got some other projects on my plate. A compression test might be in the future if I can sneak it in, but as the car runs and drives so well right now (great oil pressure, no overheating issues) I'm a bit hesitant to start looking into things. I posted a video edited to the last run (where 29.97 was recorded) to youtube at: https://youtu.be/UBv7lzsSzK0 In hitting approximately 50 miles an hour, my speedometer was showing more around 60, which is why I stopped the run where I did. If I had gotten to 60, I can't imagine how wound out the engine would have sounded, as she was screaming pretty good at least to my ears. Thanks for reading everyone, Respectfully submitted, Rusty
  10. It very much looks like the gauge cluster out of my 14 Studebaker SC-4, however the amp gauge has definitely been replaced with something newer... As you pointed out...
  11. The 1915 Studebakers had a different style of top than the 1914. That's why I think there is a difference in the windshield. The square style with the the points on the top is the more modern style, while the rounded edge is the older style in support of the two man top and the leather straps used to keep it in place when the top is up... The photos I have come from a book called "This is a Studebaker Year, Vol. 5"
  12. As a follow-up, another easy way to tell a 1914 Studebaker versus a 1915 Studebaker (at least the 4 cylinder cars, not sure about the 6 cylinder cars) is that there is a fill neck in the cowl for the gas tank on the 1914 cars. You can see it in the picture of my car...
  13. 1915 Studebaker? My 14 has a similar line but the headlights on my car are mounted lower...
  14. I had similar snow to what Stude Light was referring to, plus a few more inches today. I had to shuffle cars around for maintenance. Both started surprisingly well for roughly 15degF temps. (WOOO HEAT WAVE!) The Chevy did really well traction wise, whilst the Buick slid the tires a bit more. Probably something to do with the Buick having a 4.9 to 1 rear axle ratio with skinnier tires.
  15. Hello all, I thought an update was in order as I've had some success with coming up with a possible solution that I can try. After some research, my father and I stumbled on a water pump impeller for a Johnson/Evinrude outboard motor: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00027GW30/ref=od_aui_detailpages00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 Given the price, I figured it couldn't hurt to give this a shot. It's rubber, but the diameter was just about spot on, with the height of the bronze hub also matching the original impeller hub height (from what I could measure). A little bit of shaving on the ends of the fins created the clearance needed to fit in the housing. With a piece of 0.75 inch cold rolled steel on hand, I was able to cut and hack a new shaft together and pin it all together with a roll pin. The first picture is the new shaft and impeller compared to the original. The second is a test fit of the new setup in the housing. The final picture is of a test installation on the engine, confirming that the new shaft engaged with the original drive system. I have some more work to do in getting the crud out of the cooling system, but I think this will be an improvement over what was originally there. Whether it is a permanent solution will be determined as things progress. Many thanks to Greg and everyone who got me down the road of getting my car back up and running again! Thanks for reading, Rusty