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Curt Curtiss

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  1. Pete,, Correct, the one in my hand is the one I need and the one on my other car is a non-salon, Do you have one or two available for a Salon? Carl, I will be in Auburn this year so go ahead and bring it in case I do not come up with one for a salon, I need something at this point to hold the lens in.
  2. I am looking to buy the chrome tail light lens retainer ring for a 31-33 Auburn, also if you have the lens retainer springs I am looking for those. If you have the whole tail light and do not want to break it up I will consider the whole tail light.
  3. Thanks for the options, I will make some calls. Someone also pointed out the trim on a early 60's VW is the same dimension, it was cheap enough so I ordered a kit to see how it looks.
  4. Thanks for the tip! I just checked with a friend who has a bug and his does look to be the same dimensions, get a whole kit for $89 that fits a 54 to 63 bug from https://www.jbugs.com/product/111898111SS.html
  5. One of our cars has what appears to be brass half oval trim and the chrome shop messed one piece up (they said it was weak to start with and about 3 inches broke off one of the sides). Our other car seems to have aluminum (maybe Stainless) trim. It looks like pretty common 3/4 inch half oval trim that uses spring clips.Any idea where to source trim like this? I would take brass, aluminum or stainless if I could find it. Thanks,
  6. One of our cars has what appears to be brass half oval trim and the chrome shop messed one piece up (they said it was weak to start with and about 3 inches broke off one of the sides). Our other car seems to have aluminum (maybe Stainless) trim. It looks like pretty common 3/4 inch half oval trim that uses spring clips.Any idea where to source trim like this? I would take brass, aluminum or stainless if I could find it. Thanks,
  7. I am looking for a source for 3/4 inch Half Oval Molding (uses Spring Clips). This is the cowl trim for a 1931-1933 Auburn.One of our cars has what appears to be brass half oval trim and the chrome shop messed one piece up (they said it was weak to start with and about 3 inches broke off one of the sides). Our other car seems to have aluminum (maybe Stainless) trim. It looks like pretty common 3/4 inch half oval trim that uses spring clips.Any idea where to source trim like this? I would take brass, aluminum or stainless if I could find it.
  8. Our AACA club had a fire truck donated to us so our youth group can participate in the Great Race. We found the Chevy 235 has a damaged head so we are in search of a 235 Chevy Truck head cast number 3836848 if you happen to know of one. Please feel free to call me at 615-469-0633 and let me know what you have so I can hook you up with our build team. We are in Murfreesboro, Tennessee just outside of Nashville. Thanks, Curt
  9. 2 days ago I went ahead and tried the Belzona 1111 metal epoxy repair and that stuff is very tough when it dries. I am letting it set up for a few days then will take the block back over for a magnaflux, hopeful that will fix it. I talked to the ACD factory and they said they have had success using this stuff in the past.
  10. I am in search of a complete 1931 - 1933 Lycoming 8 complete engine or bare block. Please call Curt at 615-469-0633
  11. I am in search of a complete 1931 - 1933 Lycoming 8 complete engine or bare block. Please call Curt at 615-469-0633
  12. Another update: When I took the block back to the machine shop he found 2 cracks developed in the weld. My welder tried again but found the cracks moved and the areas they moved to were too thin in the water jacket to weld. I am looking for another block and also trying plan C: I purchased some Belzona 1111 metal epoxy and I applied it this morning and I just went down and took a spare blob I kept and whacked it with a hammer and this stuff is very tough. I am going to let it dry a day or two and see how it is once it totally cures. My issue it is very near where the valve spring is and I am worried about structure holding up. I am still looking for another engine but this may be my only option.
  13. UPDATE: Well I wanted to give you all an update after months of deciding what to do I took a dual path approach. I have a spare engine that would need sleeving and bearings so I cleaned that block up in case my next plan did not work The main plan was to pulling the engine out and disassembled it to bare block. I took it to a local stitchnlock expert and the location was in a place where it could not be drilled and tapped so then to plan B. PLAN B: I came across a company by the name of MuggyWeld and they have a special rod called a muggyweld 77 which is just for welding cast iron. This is a process that does not require preheating of the cast iron which was important to me because I did not want to melt out the babbot cam bearing. Ibought 2lbs of some very expensive rod for about $65 and ran it down to a friends shop who has successfully welded cast in the past. He drilled the ends and v'd out the crack and the muggyweld rods worked like a champ. Crack is all sealed and no strange noise or residual cracks from welding. ========================================== This is some info form the Muggyweld website on the rods, If they work this well all the time I am sold. https://www.muggyweld.com/product/77-electrode/ 77 is a premium electrode that produces welds which are high strength, crack resistant, and porosity free when applied to a wide variety of cast irons. The special tri-metal core wire has a high current carrying capacity and the specially designed coating converts the impurities of the base metal into slag instead of being trapped in the deposit. The high deposition rate creates an extremely narrow heat affected zone– a feature suitable for all weldable cast irons requiring post weld machining. 77 cast iron welding rods are softer than nickel rods, and have unique properties that allow the cast iron welds to stretch and elongate up to 300 percent more than other rods, which helps prevent the base metal and weld from cracking in the process. Here is a video of them doing a cast weld, no preheating of the block. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K85MH9Z5FPU
  14. We finally got to pulling the engine out of the 1933 8-105 and when we removed the pistons we were surprised. I found each of the pistons we labeled .060 over so that was ok. The strange part is they had a hole drilled in the skirt along with a "T" style slit in the sides of Pistons below the ring level. I have never seen this before, have you all seen this and what would the reason be for doing this?
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