Modeleh

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About Modeleh

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  1. Packard here in nice condition. https://losangeles.craigslist.org/sgv/cto/d/valyermo-1955-packard-400/6990127773.html
  2. Too many to choose from. https://losangeles.craigslist.org/wst/ctd/d/anaheim-1940-ford-standard-sedan/6999484594.html https://losangeles.craigslist.org/lac/cto/d/los-angeles-1955-pontiac-2-door-wagon/6995309434.html https://losangeles.craigslist.org/sgv/cto/d/chino-1941-pontiac/6997434542.html
  3. https://losangeles.craigslist.org/wst/cto/d/orange-1961-ford-pickup-unibody-short/6998487674.html https://losangeles.craigslist.org/lac/cto/d/whittier-1950-ford-shoebox/6999347731.html https://losangeles.craigslist.org/sgv/cto/d/pasadena-1963-ford-falcon-all-original/6999702935.html A few of my choices to ponder. California has a great supply of nice old cars.
  4. Yes that’s what we are having to do. Just that it’s easier said than done but that’s how the lions share of the restoration was done. Sorry I don’t have a photo of one as we don’t have any to photograph or copy. For those who aren’t familiar with igniters they are essentially like a set of large ignition points that fit into the cylinder each one operated by a pushrod from a camshaft to a trip lever on the igniter mechanism to open and close the contacts to create a spark gap. Most engines were converted to spark plugs early on like the similar 1907 Fiat of the Larz Anderson collection. After finding out about that car I was hopeful we would have a similar system to copy but the curator told me it was converted to spark plugs around 1911 and the original parts weren’t saved. I guess my comment was more about the notion that any part can be found given enough time and money which is optimistic but I don’t believe to be true.
  5. We’re still looking for 4 igniters for a 1906 Zust if anybody out there has any they’re using as doorstops please let me know. They are a 3 bolt pattern that mounts to each cylinder. The eureka moment was finding a low tension Bosch mag with Oil printed in three different languages on the lube cap, not an easy thing to stumble upon in British Columbia. Searching since 1980, running out of time! 😂
  6. Yes, exactly why I used the Corvair as a comparison. The supply exceeds the demand just like Model A sedans particularly 4 doors. Someone commented that the four door A is more desirable than the Tudor, I have to disagree with, again nobody is hot rodding 4 door As but lots Tudors are still getting butchered. Also few people are restoring Fordors right now because there’s just so much extra wood in them and it’s cheaper to just buy one done, there’s lots around and little demand. The OP has proven that with his experience trying to unload his. Long story short, bodystyle matters. Unless you’re talking about a Doble or something like that, as Jay says you have to take what comes available and be lucky to find it. This is not about young people not liking old cars or the country being broke, it’s about trying to sell something with very little demand and average condition for a price that the market simply won’t bear.
  7. Something I don’t think was mentioned yet is the fact that a significant demand for early Fords comes from the hot rod crowd. It seems the OP is valuing his Model A alongside coupes, roadsters and pickups. To a novice hobbiest that seems reasonable however you have to understand that Fordors are not desirable to hot rodders or even people who like improving the performance of a stock looking car. Model AA trucks suffer the same fate to a lesser degree but the cabs are still favored by hot rodders so they are arguably more desirable than a Fordor. Think of your car like a four door Corvair. People might get a kick out of seeing it but few want to own it. When the entry price is cheap you can still have the same amount of fun in the hobby just don’t expect much at sale time.
  8. I think the comparison to the Duesenberg Twenty Grand is a fair point. And I agree that typically these types of cars don’t ever see many road miles. They are more akin to artwork. Which begs the question of how much use did the Twenty Grand actually see? I’ve seen it in person at the Nethercutt and it is stunning. The silver paint and leather were cutting edge at the time. It’s really the type of thing you have to see in person to realize how it must have felt to see it when it was new, there would have been nothing like it.
  9. This thread is making less and less sense. How are you possibly running a 6hp motor on 110v single circuit? That’s nearly 4500 watts draw. If you plan to run a hot tank off a propane or gas generator it’s going to have to run continually for hours on end it’s going to be expensive and you’re expecting a lot from that old unit.
  10. You’re better off getting a variable frequency drive from Amazon. I bought one for my 3 phase wheel balancer it was less than $300. It allows you to use 240v single phase input with 3 phase output of whatever hertz you want thereby allowing you to vary the speed of the motor. For instance you could have a variable speed drill press or bandsaw motor and not have to mess with belt sheaves for speed changes. Takes a little knowledge to get it wired up but not too bad. Go on Amazon and search Huanyang VFD. I just had an Onan 6.5kw with 201hrs since new short out the windings in my motorhome. Needless to say I’m not a fan of them.
  11. A friend of mine who’s into old motorcycles soaks rubber parts in oil of wintergreen to soften them. I have never done it myself but if you google search “oil of wintergreen to soften rubber” there’s a recipe to dilute with water to make a soaking solution. I think he gets the oil from a health food store or that section of a drug store. Maybe those seals could be saved. I’m part Ukrainian and my wife is Dutch/Scottish what a combination. Trying to breathe new life into old junk is a bad habit but it can be rewarding.
  12. I found this 1955 Dodge postal van and couldn’t resist bringing it home. I don’t think many have survived, internet research shows very few examples, maybe less than a hundred remain? Supposedly USPS ordered 3000 but it’s unclear how many were actually built. The coach work was done by Fageol. It is right hand drive with a stepped down frame so it can be driven standing up. It has a corrugated roll up door in the rear. I will be installing a slant six and automatic. It originally would have had a Flathead six with an automatic but the powertrain was gone.
  13. If he can’t tell you if the heater works the guy is a moron. Morons typically don’t take good care of their stuff. I would suspect he will be hiding other problems by playing dumb. But is it playing dumb or? Unless this is a GTE or XR7 G walk away from it and find one to buy from a more intelligent person.
  14. You might be further ahead to just replace the entire axle. I’m sure you can find a second hand axle complete with electric brakes from someone dismantling a modern junk RV trailer.
  15. Thanks for the information, next time I’m near Orcas I’ll have to take a ride. $30 is very reasonable and I’ve always wanted a ride in a Mountain Wagon.