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AussieStudie

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About AussieStudie

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  1. Hi Simon, haven't heard from you. Did you find the mounts , thanks Mark.
  2. Thanks, Simon, that would help to see the originals, also do you have two more for the back. On the original, it had Bosch in large letters and the two I have Bosch is in small letters. Is there a difference in age
  3. Thank you for that site but there is no information on what the mount between the shock to the rail. On the back of the shock there is two hex nuts locked together on a 1/2 inch threaded axel The shock would rotate when the move . I think there must be some mount to hold the two nuts and lock to the car ???? Thanks for the help ,Mark
  4. Thank you for that site but there is no information on what the mount between the shock to the rail . On the back of the shock there is two hex nuts locked together on a 1/2 inch threaded axel The shock would rotate when the move . I think there must be some mount to hold the two nuts and lock to the car ???? Thanks for the help ,Mark
  5. Hi all Wondering if anyone with 1923 Studebaker EM Light tourer has knowledge of Bosch Magneto (USA) Shock Absorbers. There were originally on our Australian Colonial, but were taken off by previous person. We now have obtained some, we know these were an aftemarket extra, we are lucky to have photos of the car in the 20's which show these shock absorbers, given to us by the original family owners, so no doubt they were on. Would appreciate any photos of brackets/mount, what it looks like and how there were mounted. Thank you, look forward to hearing from some
  6. Hi all Wondering if anyone with 1923 Studebaker EM Light tourer has knowledge of Bosch Magneto (USA) Shock Absorbers. There were originally on our Australian Colonial, but were taken off by previous person. We now have obtained some, we know these were an aftemarket extra, we are lucky to have photos of the car in the 20's which show these shock absorbers, given to us by the original family owners, so no doubt they were on. Would appreciate any photos of brackets/mount, what it looks like and how there were mounted. Thank you, look forward to hearing from some
  7. Scott, Thanks, mate, can rely on your constructive comments! You have to come and experience an Australian Summer sometime. Yes earlier days in restoration, even displaying some Australian timber frame. Spring was more comfortable than the milk crate that was there previously. Mark
  8. Bernie requested that we upload information on our dashboard. Reference Book - The Studebaker Corporation of America (South Bend, Indiana, Detroit, Michigan Walkerville, Canada) Studebaker Light Six sales manual Open-Car Refinements - (Page Twelve ) - "The instruments are conventionally grouped on a walnut-finished steel instrument board reinforced with wood to prevent noise" As our car is an original Canadian Cycle and Motor Agency, Queensland version of the Australian Colonial, which was originally exported from Studebaker Walkerville Canada as a CKD kit. At the
  9. We also found a surprise, a long-abandoned mouse/rat nest within the engine block, how they got through the water pump is a miracle, maybe that is why it was abandoned.
  10. Hi Bernie, Amazing for Rusty Relic, the original key was in the ignition. Sorry not the number you are looking
  11. Hi Gary, Great to hear you love our car and we enjoyed our quick gathering, next visit will have to be longer. Sorry, have to set the facts straight on this one. The timber is Australian Silky Oak (they seed pods won't kill you when the drop...unlike much of our other fauna and wildlife). Silky Oaks were vastly used in the 1920's to 1940's to make timber furniture, window sills, door frames etc, it was a cheaper timber to work with, similar grain to English Oak, but not as long. You were correct that Queensland did have Silky Oak trees were readily available in the bush and throughout Que
  12. Mr Scott....You jovial jester about our unique Australian Colonials, but we Australians are also a unique breed, descendants of convict stock! ...... To answer your questions, the photos are one and the same car. When we first saw in Feb 2011 at local swap meet, it was a "Rusty Relic", we decided against at the time. Twelve months later in Feb 2012, we were told it was for sale again, after the people who had bought could not agree, one wanted to Hot Rod (thus the electric blue, it was painted), the other wanted to restore original, they did agree with each other to sell. Whic
  13. Hi Bernie We have been off forum, for a while. Searching online came across Gary's photo which lead us back to forum, so sorry we missed the start. We totally understand what you are going through as we have had this journey. We bought our car back in 2012, we first saw in 2011 and loved but as you can see by photos, just a little rusty, only months later it had been attacked and we knew we had to rescue the more old thing. Now almost 6 years later, we have researched and learnt a lot and more than happy to talk with you. Yes, we have emailed Scott many times over the yea
  14. Hi, We are the Australian owners of the Studebaker, Scott mentioned. Our studebaker was purchased from Creek Street, Brisbane branch of the Canadian Cycle Motor Company. The original owner lived in a country town about 2 hours west of Brisbane, which is where the car has spent 3/4's of its life. The gentleman was a local builder and after a few years of owning the car, took the back off to make it into a "ute" (utility), but like all great Australian farmers, you don't throw anything away and it was placed in one of the sheds on the farm. The car was sold to another local family and when t
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