Roadmaster71

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About Roadmaster71

  • Rank
    Senior Member
  • Birthday 09/30/1949

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://www.idlenot.com
  • Yahoo
    ke1ri@yahoo.com

Profile Information

  • Gender:
    Male
  • Location:
    Rhode Island
  • Interests:
    Old Cars
    Amateur Radio
    Radio Restoration
    Kayaking

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  1. Mine came in email a couple days ago. Try this link: https://files.constantcontact.com/8cca7e3a001/d58463a1-08fb-4846-861c-a6c2551c4d45.pdf
  2. Thanks for the heads up. I have posted the story to another forum that I am told is more appropriate (Our Cars and Restoration Projects). The correct link for the story is: http://www.wpraaca.com/blog/micheles-51-buick-part-ii
  3. My friend Charlie Nash recently purchased a 1951 Buick sedan for his wife. Charlie has been spending the winter doing a meticulous repair and restoration of all systems. He goes well beyond 'just make it work'. Charlie has written a second chapter to his series of blogs about his first encounter with a 1951 Buick. He writes well and provides lots of great information. His latest update shows how he removed a manifold without cracking it, extracted and replaced freeze plugs (casting plugs), and replaced a worn out thermostat among other things. I think many will find his post interesting. You can find it on the WPRAACA website blog section. Please feel free to leave Charlie comments after reading about his work.
  4. My friend Charlie Nash recently purchased a 1951 Buick sedan for his wife. Charlie has been spending the winter doing a meticulous repair and restoration of all systems. He goes well beyond 'just make it work'. Charlie has written a second chapter to his series of blogs about his first encounter with a 1951 Buick. He writes well and provides lots of great information. His latest update shows how he removed a manifold without cracking it, extracted and replaced freeze plugs (casting plugs), and replaced a worn out thermostat among other things. I think many will find his post interesting. You can find it on the Westerly-Patcatuck Region website. to leave Charlie comments after reading about his work.
  5. Neil's photo of the bracket shows what you need. You don't often find one attached to a used radio. I'll post a couple of photos below showing the area where it goes. That bracket will be bolted with two bolts to a spot just behind the big chrome radio surround and speaker grill. The first photo shows a view of the installed radio from the bottom. If you look at the second photo you will see where the bracket attaches on the mounting pads (the top pair, I think).
  6. Pete … You are welcome. We had a discussion similar to this one before. Click HERE for the link. That should provide you with more photos. Ken
  7. Here is a photo of the rear bumper guards on my 1941 Buick Roadmaster.
  8. Thanks to retirednow and John S. Charlie, the man working on the 1951 Buick, assures me that more stories will follow. He is a man driven. His barn where the Buick is kept is unheated. He has been out there working daily for the last month. The typical winter day here in RI goes from 15-40 degrees F. It's his wife's car. He is very good to her!
  9. One of our AACA Westerly-Pawcatuck Region members just posted a blog on our club website. The story is all about a 1951 Buick that his wife just fell in love with. After inspecting and purchasing the car our hero, Charlie Nash, began to make the car fully ship shape. It is a nice story with some great photos and a short photo quiz at the end. More stories will follow as the restoration progresses. Please check out his blog and others we have posted from various club members. Comments are always appreciated! Charlie's latest can be found by clicking on the title: The Lonely Buick. (Note: we have a bunch of other stories including a poem about a '37 Ford coupe. It was written by one of our AACA wives, Barbara.)
  10. One of our AACA Westerly-Pawcatuck Region members just posted a blog on our club website. The story is all about a 1951 Buick that his wife just fell in love with. After inspecting and purchasing the car our hero, Charlie Nash, began to make the car fully ship shape. It is a nice story with some great photos and a short photo quiz at the end. More stories will follow as the restoration progresses. Please check out his blog and others we have posted from various club members. Comments are always appreciated! Charlie's latest can be found by clicking on the title: The Lonely Buick. (Note: we have a bunch of other stories including a poem about a '37 Ford coupe. It was written by one of our AACA wives, Barbara.)
  11. Some of my posts on this thread and additional details are now in a blog post I put on our region website. It includes removing the speedometer, installing the speedometer cable, breaking the ammeter and repairing another, and getting ready for a new wiring harness. If you are interested please visit the Westerly-Pawcatuck Region website for the short blog post and photos.
  12. Photos of my well-worn interior. I believe the seat covers were replaced many years ago. My best clue is the rear armrest that does not look like it is made of the correct material according to Buick brochures. The lower seat trim and headliner may be original. The doors are so ratty they have to be original. Comments are welcome.
  13. I have a 1941 Buick Roadmaster Touring Sedan. I have attached a couple of photos below to show you what my original hardware looks like. Although the general style of the handles seem to be the same as yours mine also show the base (escutcheon ? ) since they are still in the car. Some of them are missing the silver insert that goes inside the knob. Hopefully these images will be of some assistance.
  14. Mike, I know where it attaches on the 1941. It may be the same for the 1940. You have to get under the car on the driver's side. Then get yourself right under the side of the transmission. I had to put the car on jack stands because I could not fit my body close enough to see or feel anything. Follow the speedometer cable with your hand. I think it goes almost to the top (floor pan side) of the transmission. You will be able to feel the connector with your hand. Unscrew it by hand or if you cannot go at it gently with an adjustable wrench. It should release easily if your transmission leaks as much as mine does. In the photos I have attached you will see the place where it connected after I removed the cable (cable in foreground in one photo). In some older cars there was a trap door in the floor pan that was used to access this. Not in the '41. Note: The cable I bought from CARS was a bit too long. I mounted the curve on the driver's fender to take up the slack. The speedometer didn't work so well. I moved it back to the original clamp on the steering column and after some 100 miles or so it is working pretty good up to 60 mph.
  15. I may give that a try. I did lubricate the cable, all except the last 12 inches or so, with white grease before installing. I did this on the recommendation of a club member who is a professional mechanic from long ago. If I lube the end of the cable that enters the housing is there any chance that the lube will migrate into the head and gum up the magnets there? I have heard others express this as a concern.