Roadmaster71

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About Roadmaster71

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    Senior Member
  • Birthday 09/30/1949

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  • Website URL
    http://www.idlenot.com
  • Yahoo
    ke1ri@yahoo.com

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  • Gender:
    Male
  • Location:
    Rhode Island
  • Interests:
    Old Cars
    Amateur Radio
    Radio Restoration
    Kayaking

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  1. My paint code indicates that the car was originally black. It is now two-tone green. As best I can determine the upper is Mermaid Green (580) and the lower is Ludington Green (570). The car was repainted many years ago. I have no history on it. The paint chip page for this car indicates that it was offered with code 575 (upper Ludington, lower English Green) or code 579 (upper Mermaid green, lower Cedar green). Neither of these match my car, assuming my eyes and those of a local automotive paint shop specialists are correct. My engine bay is the same as the lower color (Ludington green). The chart you have indicates that Sherwin Williams 9205 will work (or Dupont 93-20952 or 246-53407). My local paint guy never found that. He estimates (by comparing chips he has) that it is close to (and this is what he wrote down): Deck #6-1-01 Prospecto-, Chip # 6-1-2345-00, Paint Code - ESQ, car: Citroen. He will mix that and then adjust by sight to my car. (I need to bring him a panel.) A couple photos of my car are attached for reference. My question is similar to yours: were custom two-tones available or did the factory always stick to what is written in the paint charts and catalogs? Did someone repaint my car 'the way they wanted it to look' or were they copying something that was available as an unadvertised option? (Note: my wheels are black. With this color combination it looks like they should be maybe Ludington Green with a Cream stripe?)
  2. My '41 fuel pump was leaking from one of the many screws that hold on the diaphragm section. The man who rebuilt it put a heli-coil and it has held nicely. If you don't want to order a whole batch of them just go to a local machine shop and see if they will sell you one or two. They always have them on hand in the tool room. Regarding JB Weld, I once cut through a seized fitting that was on an outdoor water hose spigot. Unfortunately I managed to cut through an outer thread on the spigot. I then covered the thread and small hole with JB-Weld, lightly screwed on the garden hose, and then removed the hose. The next day the hose went on nicely. There is a tiny but acceptable leak, though. Way better than before.
  3. Charlie Nash, VP of the Westerly-Pawcatuck region has posted part III of his ongoing restoration of his wife's new car. He took plenty of plenty of photos and posted all the details to our club blog. You can check it out here: http://www.wpraaca.com/blog/micheles-51-buick-part-iii-by-charlie-nash Please feel free to leave comments. This will encourage Charlie to continue to share his work. He is meticulous in all that he does and he is a good writer. Check it out!
  4. You may want to check to see if the wire that supplies the positive voltage from the meter is good. Run a temporary wire from the positive supply of the meter to the gauge. That 3 volts may jump to 6 and solve the problem. If it does and the gauge works you will need to replace the wire currently in the car. Also, without installing the sending unit at all you should be able to work it through its range by lifting and lowering the float to see if the gauge responds properly. Just have ground and supply properly connected. To test your ground point (where you cleaned it) attach one end of the ohm meter to that ground and the other via a long jumper wire (maybe no. 16 size) to the battery ground strap. It should read close to 0 ohms.
  5. Be sure to call Skip first. I last spoke with him at Hershey in October. At that time he still had not resumed manufacture of the parts. He advised that I check back often to see if he is up and running again.
  6. Mine came in email a couple days ago. Try this link: https://files.constantcontact.com/8cca7e3a001/d58463a1-08fb-4846-861c-a6c2551c4d45.pdf
  7. Thanks for the heads up. I have posted the story to another forum that I am told is more appropriate (Our Cars and Restoration Projects). The correct link for the story is: http://www.wpraaca.com/blog/micheles-51-buick-part-ii
  8. My friend Charlie Nash recently purchased a 1951 Buick sedan for his wife. Charlie has been spending the winter doing a meticulous repair and restoration of all systems. He goes well beyond 'just make it work'. Charlie has written a second chapter to his series of blogs about his first encounter with a 1951 Buick. He writes well and provides lots of great information. His latest update shows how he removed a manifold without cracking it, extracted and replaced freeze plugs (casting plugs), and replaced a worn out thermostat among other things. I think many will find his post interesting. You can find it on the WPRAACA website blog section. Please feel free to leave Charlie comments after reading about his work.
  9. My friend Charlie Nash recently purchased a 1951 Buick sedan for his wife. Charlie has been spending the winter doing a meticulous repair and restoration of all systems. He goes well beyond 'just make it work'. Charlie has written a second chapter to his series of blogs about his first encounter with a 1951 Buick. He writes well and provides lots of great information. His latest update shows how he removed a manifold without cracking it, extracted and replaced freeze plugs (casting plugs), and replaced a worn out thermostat among other things. I think many will find his post interesting. You can find it on the Westerly-Patcatuck Region website. to leave Charlie comments after reading about his work.
  10. Neil's photo of the bracket shows what you need. You don't often find one attached to a used radio. I'll post a couple of photos below showing the area where it goes. That bracket will be bolted with two bolts to a spot just behind the big chrome radio surround and speaker grill. The first photo shows a view of the installed radio from the bottom. If you look at the second photo you will see where the bracket attaches on the mounting pads (the top pair, I think).
  11. Pete … You are welcome. We had a discussion similar to this one before. Click HERE for the link. That should provide you with more photos. Ken
  12. Here is a photo of the rear bumper guards on my 1941 Buick Roadmaster.
  13. Thanks to retirednow and John S. Charlie, the man working on the 1951 Buick, assures me that more stories will follow. He is a man driven. His barn where the Buick is kept is unheated. He has been out there working daily for the last month. The typical winter day here in RI goes from 15-40 degrees F. It's his wife's car. He is very good to her!
  14. One of our AACA Westerly-Pawcatuck Region members just posted a blog on our club website. The story is all about a 1951 Buick that his wife just fell in love with. After inspecting and purchasing the car our hero, Charlie Nash, began to make the car fully ship shape. It is a nice story with some great photos and a short photo quiz at the end. More stories will follow as the restoration progresses. Please check out his blog and others we have posted from various club members. Comments are always appreciated! Charlie's latest can be found by clicking on the title: The Lonely Buick. (Note: we have a bunch of other stories including a poem about a '37 Ford coupe. It was written by one of our AACA wives, Barbara.)
  15. One of our AACA Westerly-Pawcatuck Region members just posted a blog on our club website. The story is all about a 1951 Buick that his wife just fell in love with. After inspecting and purchasing the car our hero, Charlie Nash, began to make the car fully ship shape. It is a nice story with some great photos and a short photo quiz at the end. More stories will follow as the restoration progresses. Please check out his blog and others we have posted from various club members. Comments are always appreciated! Charlie's latest can be found by clicking on the title: The Lonely Buick. (Note: we have a bunch of other stories including a poem about a '37 Ford coupe. It was written by one of our AACA wives, Barbara.)