TedH

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About TedH

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    Junior Member
  • Birthday 11/03/1950

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    Writer.

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  1. I'm a writer working out of the Milwaukee area. Forum members have helped me many times over the years, mainly with identifying automobiles and trucks in photographs, sometimes when only a quarter panel is visible. About two years ago, I asked for input on a story focused on what I termed "markup in the automobile business." There were many helpful responses; ultimately, I was greatly aided by an industry insider. First draft of the story is here: Markup In The Automobile Business. Please have a look and let me know your thoughts. (Some of you will see your earlier comments.) Goal is to make corrections and received additional input. Many thanks, Ted
  2. I'm not in the market for a vehicle but have leased or purchased many over the years (I'm 66 and my first experience was helping my mom buy a new car in 1973 while I was in college). I'm working on this because it interests me.
  3. Thanks again to all who replied to my post, “Markup In The Automobile Business.” I compiled the comments and applied the various percentages-off MSRP mentioned to TrueCar’s 2017 CRV pricing (attached). TrueCar’s MSRP is $28,895 and the factory invoice is $27,444, which is about 5% below MSRP. No forum member mentioned a typical markup that low. The lowest was 8%; the highest was 33% off a “slow-selling car with 500 miles” which the 2017 CRV isn’t but just for comparison, this would result in it selling for $19,360, a loss of $8,084 to the dealer if TrueCar’s $27,444 factory invoice is correct. Naturally, “holdbacks,” “volume discounts,” etc. might have an impact, but they are among the factors that motivate this in a 2013 Edmund’s story (https://www.edmunds.com/car-buying/dealer-holdback/): “However, determining the dealer's actual net cost is difficult, even for seasoned automotive insiders.” The “even for seasoned automotive insiders” is telling. Some members have commented that my story is “old news” or well-covered. I’d appreciate any book or magazine article titles or website URLs that members are aware of that plainly lay out markup in the automobile business—I’d like to review them.
  4. Great find just across Wisconsin from where I'm located. Looks like it's in fairly decent condition.
  5. Thanks for the insightful comments. I invite forum members, who have a little time, to review the attached national sales prices for a Honda CR-V according to TrueCar. The “market average” is about a grand above factory invoice, some sales appear to be higher than the MSRP, and some below factory invoice. Maybe I’m not interpreting this correctly; otherwise, why would a vehicle that sometimes commands more than the MSRP be sold for less than its dealer cost on other occasions? (Note: I condensed the information on the TrueCar sheet using Photoshop Elements.)
  6. Thanks to all who have commented on this topic. Lots of helpful replies. I'm sorting through the posts now, doing additional research, and putting together questions. Thanks, TedH
  7. Those are impressive credentials, Steve, and I appreciate your taking the time to respond. Will be back with some questions but not today; leaving soon for a meeting.
  8. Hello from America's Dairyland. I'm exploring writing a story about how the automobile business operates. No, I don't believe dealers pay anything near what is listed on the "dealer invoice"; second, I've never seen a convincing story with information from insiders on how the business truly works; third, I'm not looking to make things harder for anyone. Goal is truth. I've had some experience in retail, and the typical markup is 100%—buy for $10, sell for $20. Sometimes, rather confusingly, this is referred to as a 50% markup, meaning 50% of the selling price is markup. My goal is to find individuals with long, industry experience, interview them, and write a report. Please send an e-mail to deneb77@icloud.com if you're interested in helping and wish to remain anonymous or have opinions or ideas and wish to remain anonymous.
  9. Wow! AJFord54, you're amazing. That's it exactly. Thank you very much. Curiosity sated!
  10. Hello from America's Dairyland. My wife's grandfather ran a salvage yard and used car lot in Iron Mountain, Michigan. He saved some parts and displayed them at a cabin in Wisconsin, including the ashtray in the images. The characters just visible in the second image are "M" and "1A1517S." Anyone know what model and year vehicle this is from? Members of the forum have helped me before and I'm appreciative. Thanks, Ted
  11. Excellent, keiser321. Thanks for the additional info.
  12. Thanks, as usual. Definitely think '37 Plymouth is correct. Checked Google Images and a lot of them are visible there in different basic colors. I appreciate the forum's help.
  13. I'm putting together a brief family history and need help ID-ing the model and year of another car. (BTW, this car was located in Wisconsin about 70 miles northwest of Green Bay. It gets very cold there (minus double digits) in the winter, which probably explains the cover over the grill.) Thanks, Ted
  14. Hello from America's Dairyland. My oldest brother Forrest (born, 1927) is on the left fender and my cousin Donny on the right. I'm hoping someone can identify the make and year of the car. Many thanks.