Kimo

Members
  • Content Count

    158
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

19 Good

About Kimo

  • Rank
    Senior Member
  • Birthday 10/05/1962

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. Thanks even more for all of this analysis and sleuthing! You guys are the best. And yes, my dad has a really big grin at the wheel of his Buick convertible. He was a pretty cocky Captain at the end of the war after having been a squadron commander in the Army Air Force. Those fly-guys were pretty full of themselves which I believe is to be forgiven when you think of what they had accomplished.
  2. Thanks SBRMD! You really know these fine autos to spot those clues. It is sounding more and more certain that this is a 1940 Super convertible.
  3. Thanks, John, that is really good sleuthing from an old photo. This photo would have been taken in either 1944 or 1945 so this 1940 Buick would not have been terribly old at the time and perhaps not likely to have been restored after so few years of use, especially since he had been away at the war for much of the time and it would have been left stored in his parents' garage during that time.
  4. Thanks, guys - you are the best! I wish I did have more photos of my dad's Buick convertible and him in it, but this is the only one I have. I also really wish he kept it and passed it along to me
  5. Thanks, Ben. Any idea on the model? Is it a Super or something else?
  6. Hi everyone. I am here to ask the Buick experts as to whether the car in this photo is a Buick convertible and if so what is the year and model? This is a photo of my dad around 1945 - he was a squadron commander in the US Army Air Force during WW2 and he always liked cars that were a bit sportier than the average. I would appreciate any information or just general thoughts as to whether this is a Buick and if so what year and model. My initial thought was that it might have been a Packard but the guys over on that forum said they thought it looked more like a Buick. From looking at photos around the internet is possibly it is a Super but I am no expert and I bow to the knowledge of the people here. Thanks for anything you can tell me!
  7. I do not know for sure, but my first thought would be that it could be from the Automobile Club de l'Ouest. The A.C.O. is the oldest and largest automobile club in France. It began in 1906 and is still around. If it is the A.C.O. then as for the time period of this badge I suppose it could be just about anytime but perhaps more likely from the 1920s, 1930s, 1940s or maybe 1950s. As for value, I do not collect auto club badges and I do not see them collected much in the US so I am not sure it would be fetching a large sum in the US. There seem to be some European collectors though and perhaps it might do better there, though if it is the A.C.O. I might imagine that since it is the largest auto club in France that it may not be as rare as some of the smaller auto clubs.
  8. Another thought is that you should take into account not only the shipping cost, but also any taxes or fees that might be assessed by the country into which you are exporting the car to understand what the total cost to the buyer might be. And like any buyer anywhere, buyers normally need to get a car for something less than the market rate to take into account any hidden damages or repair needs that may not be easily seen in some photos or videos of the car. Selling to someone overseas makes returns pretty much impossible so they need to have enough comfort that they will not be buying a car that will wind up costing far more than it is worth to put into good condition should they discover something serious. And this would likely go double for a sports car where the expectation is that it has been driven hard - like a sports car - for many years and miles.
  9. The signature under the wing appears to have been made by a rotary engraver like a Dremel or a Proxxon such being weilded like a large pen. This makes it more likely that it is a home-made figure. That along with the odd and not terribly graceful or accurate proportions.
  10. It appears to be a license plate topper that would have been used by a doctor on his car. These were sold to the public and are found in many varieties to indicate that the car belonged to a doctor or a clergy member or an undertaker or some profession where the car driver would want people to know that the driver was on urgent business in hopes of not getting speeding tickets or parking tickets. They are also found in various designs from various auto insurance companies that show that the car is insureed by that company in case of an accident. You can find them in various designs from clubs and membership organizations, and they are found in various advertising versions such as ones that feature something along the lines of I visited such and such national park or whatever. These were most popular in the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s but you also find even more recent ones around. They are not rare. I just did a quick Ebay search on "license plate toppers" and it came up with over 2,600 current auctions. Usually they go for around $5 to $10 for average ones, but sometimes if one has a great deal of detail or fancy transparent enamelling or such they go for more. Some sellers get it in their heads that they are rare and ask very high starting prices, but those do not seem to ever sell.
  11. Values are so hard to pin down since the word has so many meanings. What is the value of a car to a person who has an emotional attachment for example it is the actual car his grandfather bought and drove, or what is the value if a car were sold at a big auction in terms of the selling price or in terms of the cash that finally would up in the seller's pocket (there is a big spread taking into account the big fees the auction charges the seller and the taxes taken out), or what it the value if you found a person with a huge budget and who desperately wanted that particular car, or what is the value if you were to sell it to a dealer or a picker, or what is the value if you sold it locally at a small auction, etc. etc. The amount of cash you get in your pocket at the end of the day will vary widely depending on these and other factors. You also have the challenge of the Willys brand not being seen by many as "the one" in the way it would be if it were a more popular and avidly sought maker.
  12. 1. The cost is way high and someone or some people are going to be getting a big profit from it. 2. Most all of the old cars there are frankensteins of new car parts in old bodies. Original old parts have been largely unavailable for many decades and these cars are daily drivers for most Cubans so the wear and tear has been far greater than most old cars found in the US. 3. If you do not care about the money or the fact that most of the cars are frankensteins, it could be a fun trip for someone who is not used to international travel.
  13. For anyone who might like to bid or just watch the bidding for fun, the Ebay auction number for this is 281522458860 and it ends this coming Sunday, December 14. The time it ends depends on your time zone. Thanks!
  14. Thanks!! I don't know what it is worth so I was thinking of putting it up on Ebay tomorrow (Sunday) afternoon with a starting bid of $20 with no reserve and let the market decide.
  15. I was think of selling this Dodge emblem but I am not sure what it came from? My initial thought is it could be from a truck from the 1920s or 1930s? It measures 4.25 inches across and is made with blue and white cloisonné over a heavy brass-like metal. The back has two screw posts with knurled nuts. Does anyone recognize what this came from and the years it would have been used - teens, 20s, 30s, 40s? Was it on a car or a truck? Was it on the top of the radiator on the front or mounted to a side or back area? Thank you for any thoughts! You guys are great.