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wayne sheldon

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Everything posted by wayne sheldon

  1. PFindley gives the issue number information. I went and looked at my copy out of curiosity. It looks like a very nice article with a lot of basic information and small pictures of quite a few models. It appears typical of most articles and research of those years, and should not be relied upon for complete accuracy, but should be an excellent start for basic research today. Pictures are all black and white, and a bit grainy. Not a lot of detail. In my quick peruse, I did NOT see the author's name, so cannot affirm or deny your Dave Chambers question. 1955 and 1956 were the first years for
  2. Looks nice (for a modern car ) Since nobody has so far commented on the model number, I will risk one. From memory, a long time ago. The Graham Brothers used a combination of cylinder count plus wheel base for the model designations during those years. Therefore, a six cylinder 115 inch wheel base car drops the 100 and becomes a model 615. Graham was not the only company to use that designation system (I believe Packard did also for a few years). Paige (which I have one of) did not use that system. My 1927 6-45 is a six cylinder 45 hp motor (based on one of about six different com
  3. So MANY snide remarks I could make. But I won't. However a couple hopefully intelligent remarks, and a question. When a person "restores" a historic vehicle to at least appear like something close to what it would have been like when nearly new, he restores it to appeal to thousands of people that like and want cars to appear like they did when nearly new. When they choose to recreate a vehicle into their own warped view, they recreate it to appeal to a very few that happen to like it in a similarly warped view. When I restore a car, I want it to look like I ripped it out of an
  4. The reason those split rims were used, is because back in the day, they were a good design and could be worked on by any decent mechanic with a few hand tools. They are dangerous and can kill you if you foolishly do not learn how to work with them, or do not respect them. Once learned, they are easy and fairly safe to work with. I have had them on several trucks, including my dad's '68 Chevy 3/4 ton PU which I still have, and have been changing tires on them for more than 50 years since I was twelve years old. I was taught how to do them the correct ways, inspect the rims and the rings for c
  5. I have serious mixed feelings about commenting here. I do not like appraising other people's cars. And for the most part, I do NOT like most appraisers. A long-time close personal friend of mine is an exception, and one of the few that understands some of the real intricacies of antique automobile values. Now that you know me, and my dirty little secret, let me try to explain. The exchange rate between the USA dollar and the Euro is only one of several issues concerning the value of this car. The old saying about real estate values is that the most important factor is "locatio
  6. I wish I was in a better position to help with this. The Paige and its sister car the Jewett were fine cars well deserving a better place in automotive history than they have been given. Part of my Paige's story. In 1967, I was in high school, and I had a passion for history and automobiles in particular. My dad had often talked about getting and restoring an antique car, but never had gotten close to doing so. As I showed more and more interest in such things, he finally decided to buy one to become the "great family project!" What he bought was a 1927 Paige 6-45 four-door sedan in fair
  7. Cast iron welding had become a lost art. But it is one that has been rediscovered. Can you show us some better pictures highlighting the crack? It may actually be repairable. Unfortunately, your location is probably the worst part of the situation. There are a few people that could probably repair the head. But shipping both ways could be prohibitive. If you can find a good one, at least shipping only one way would be about half as bad.
  8. Sometimes, I really hate sticking my neck out on these things. I don't like to appraise another person's junk er stuff. Motometers are really tough to appraise. There are so MANY variations that affect the value a lot. The fact is, that Boyce Motometers can run anywhere from $5 to nearly $2000. People that see one sell for $500 to over $1000 don't like being told that theirs is only worth $30. Sad, but all too often true. I would say that Mark Shaw's (not picking on him, he is essentially correct) estimate is actually a bit high for average models in average condition. Some types of
  9. Sounds like you are having fun! That is a good thing. As for losing a radiator neck? Been there, done that. I have heard of it several times with Horseless Carriage/Veteran cars over the years.
  10. Looks like a nice axle. Sorry, I don't recognize what it is from. Where is it (are you) located. Might make a big difference to someone being interested in it.
  11. A few thoughts. I am not what I consider an expert on Metz, but do think I know a little about them. First, I think it is the standard roadster offering for 1911/'12/'13. The top, windshield and mother-in-law seat (or rumble seat) were optional on the standard roadster. The special roadster was offered in 1913 with less of a cowling, lowered seat, and larger round gasoline tank mounted on the rear deck. The Special Roadster's standard color was red and black. In 1914, there was a model called the Speedster by Metz, similar to the 1913 Special roadster, but with a different gasoline
  12. I have never used a Remy mag. But several people I have talked to over the years have switched to a Bosch mag, and said they liked them much better. I have had and run a few cars with Bosch DU4 mags, and I really liked them. One common mistake made with some high-tension magnetos is with the spark plug gap. It NEEDS to be smaller than most other ignition systems. Many years ago I saw it in a vintage reference book, and it recommended 18 thousandths as opposed to the usual 30 or so. This figure does vary somewhat with different makes and models of magnetos, but the DU4 is what I have run and wh
  13. I didn't notice the flag when I saw this on the MTFCA forum. But I do usually notice a Metz when I see one. And this clearly was. I am glad that you you moved that to be seen here also. Thank you! Will you be going to the Metz gathering in July?
  14. " no need to wash for a while now. " You? Or the car? My apologies. It was a cheap shot. But I simply could not help myself! More wonderful photos. Thank you for sharing them. As Always.
  15. Personally, I don't like putting things like electric fuel pumps on antique automobiles. Properly rebuilt and maintained early technology is usually pretty good. The big question is, where is the gasoline tank located? IHC motors are usually about the middle of the chassis. A three inch drop from the bottom of the tank to the input of the carburetor should be fine. For comparison, a model T Ford is no more than that and the gasoline tank is located about three feet back towards the rear of the car. They can be trouble climbing hills, but most usual hills are not generally a problem as lon
  16. Nice! It is always fun to get those little details done. Not exactly the same, however very similar to the ones on my '19 Ford boat-tail speedster. I don't know what they were off of originally.
  17. It is amazing what you can accomplish by a little creative thinking!
  18. Some cars, with a strong battery and good starter, can pull enough gasoline to prime the vacuum tank. IMPORTANT caution! That CAN be bad for the starter, could burn out the armature or melt solder connections or cables. So you need to know your car and if you want to risk it. Choke the engine, crank several times, pause to allow vacuum sucking to stop so that the gasoline pulled into the top of the tank can drain into the carburetor. It only takes a very small amount of gasoline to start the motor, but that gasoline has to be in the carburetor first. If the first cycle doesn't start the m
  19. I love that Steam Lorry! But then, I like a lot of that stuff. The Chalmers seems to be a great car four touring about and seeing the sights! Thank you for sharing the adventure! Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2
  20. Definitely Buick. '26/'27 as keiser31 says. (He is usually right!)
  21. Just looked in here, don't know too many Chalmers cars. That is my excuse for missing this thread and I am sticking to it. However, I have played around with early racing cars and speedsters for a few years. One of the finest single car threads I have seen in a long time. Wonderful reporting. Fantastic photos of a lot of incredible cars and meets (ralleyes?). I even saw several cars I am familiar with from other websites. I have for several years been envious of the Veteran car activities in the U K. Personally, I dislike wearing modern helmets with antique automobiles. I much pr
  22. I cannot recall at the moment what the "GG" stands for. But they were a vacuum fuel pump (vacuum tank) used by a number of automobiles in the 1920s (maybe also earlier). They are far more rare than the common Stewart Vacuum Tank, and I have never had or used one of these so know very little about them. I am fairly sure Chevrolet used them for a few years and models. I am also fairly sure that some Chevrolet models used the Stewart tank. I have no knowledge of which models used which, or any other marques that used the GG. These used to show up at swap meets occasionally, but not nearly a
  23. That style of hub and brake was used from some time in I think 1912 through 1914. Before that Metz used a multiple disc brake inside the hub, and did not have the brakes on the inner end of the deep/long hubs. For 1915, Metz switched to a single chain drive instead of the dual chain drive like this axle has. The wire wheels are nice. They were optional on most Metz cars throughout their production under the Metz name. These should use a 30X3 clincher tire. Earlier versions were smaller, some later versions had more standard looking hubs according to photos I have seen. In 1914, wire wheel
  24. In 1913, Ford standardized the ignition coils to the new KW design. Before that, Coils and coil boxes were made by several different companies and used somewhat randomly on cars at the factory, with new changes in style and fit every year. 1908 into early '13 can be a lot of fun to sort out. I think there are at least a dozen different boxes and coils used in those few years. In addition to that, pre Ts and non-Fords also used even more boxes and styles and manufacturers. In the early days, Ford was NOT the only car to use a four coil system. It is not unusual to find one of th
  25. In 1913, Ford standardized the ignition coils to the new KW design. Before that, Coils and coil boxes were made by several different companies and used somewhat randomly on cars at the factory, with new changes in style and fit every year. 1908 into early '13 can be a lot of fun to sort out. I think there are at least a dozen different boxes and coils used in those few years. In addition to that, pre Ts and non-Fords also used even more boxes and styles and manufacturers. In the early days, Ford was NOT the only car to use a four coil system. It is not unusual to find one of those boxes
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