dill_yizzy_408

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About dill_yizzy_408

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  • Birthday 04/28/1996

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  • Biography
    Right before I turned 17, i got my license, but long before that I've always been fascinated by old/antique/classic cars. My belief is that they don't make 'em as good as they used to. In my opinion, the "golden age" of cars ended when they first started putting plastic parts on cars (such as the nose-piece on a '68 GTO). I am still in high school and would like to proceed in a career of eventually restoring antique/classic cars for a living and possibly owning my own shop somewhere back home in South Texas. My dream car to find and restore is a 1967 Mercury Comet Cyclone GT. I've started on my way to learning rstoration by taking an auto-body shop class for high school the second half of Junior year. I learned how to use the hammer and dolly (for dents), the MIG welder, the oxy-acetylene torch (for shrinking), the grinder, the DA (sander), and I also learned how to use plastic body filler (but hopefully i won't have to use much of that if any at all on any classic car), and much more. Next year I'll be learning Truck Mechanics where I'll learn how to work on light/medium/heavy duty trucks (diesel and gasonine engines), because I also want to eventually be able to restore antique trucks and tractors too. My long-term goal is to learn everything possible to know about the [antique] automobile eventually. I know that may seem a little far-fetched for some, 'but hey, you gotta start somewhere'. I started by learning the basics of automotive body repair, and am taking truck mechanics next year (like I said). I see so many classic cars and trucks being neglected; to where they're hiding behind a bush, or rotting in a field or forest somewhere, or resting in barns. I feel this is such a shame when they could be preserved and/or put back on the road or in a museum. There are unrestored classic cars in need of restoration all over the place, especially out in rural areas (on people's property and in salvage yards). I enjoy looking through salvage yards that are full of old cars, but at the same time I think its sad to see essential pieces of American History rotting like many of them do. I have not acquired my first project yet, but me and a friend did major bodyworkon the hood of a '65 Mustang Fastback that was (and still is) sitting in the back lots of the vocational school I learned to do bodywork at. The school is called CCOC (Central County Occopational Center), and they teach many vocational classes there (not just automotive). So I'm 17, have always loved and been fascinated by antique cars, and will hopefully one day be working in the field of restoring old cars and also maybe hot rodding or resto-modding too...but I still have a lot to learn when it comes to the mechanical aspect of cars. I am also extremely interested in the historical signifigance of the automobile as well, knowing facts and details about many years, makes, and models. Any help is appreciated, thanks!

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